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Sarah Jane Olson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2001 | STEVE BERRY and ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If Sara Jane Olson could have picked any other moment during the last 26 years for her bombing conspiracy trial to begin, it probably would have been better than the present. The longtime fugitive, whose trial is finally due to start this month, will ask a Los Angeles Superior Court judge today to postpone jury selection until January as a result of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the East Coast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge Monday rejected another request by suspected Symbionese Liberation Army member Sara Jane Olson to throw out the 25-year-old bombing conspiracy indictment against her. Olson's defense lawyers had argued in a motion filed earlier this month that the indictment was unfair because Latinos were inadequately represented on the 1976 grand jury that approved it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge Monday rejected another request by suspected Symbionese Liberation Army member Sara Jane Olson to throw out the 25-year-old bombing conspiracy indictment against her. Olson's defense lawyers had argued in a motion filed earlier this month that the indictment was unfair because Latinos were inadequately represented on the 1976 grand jury that approved it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2001 | STEVE BERRY and ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If Sara Jane Olson could have picked any other moment during the last 26 years for her bombing conspiracy trial to begin, it probably would have been better than the present. The longtime fugitive, whose trial is finally due to start this month, will ask a Los Angeles Superior Court judge today to postpone jury selection until January as a result of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the East Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Almost three years after being fired from his nightly talk show at Black Entertainment Television in a controversy with his then-boss, commentator and author Tavis Smiley will launch a national late-night talk show on PBS. "Tavis Smiley," billed as the first West Coast talk show for PBS, will originate from KCET Studios in Hollywood starting in January, and will be paired weeknights with the network's long-running "The Charlie Rose Show."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a debate that began placidly but took a sharp turn for rough seas, district attorney candidates Gil Garcetti and Steve Cooley clashed Thursday night over issues that included cameras in court, gag orders and handling of the death penalty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen months after vanishing from a second life on the East Coast as a respected food services executive, a fugitive wanted in a Los Angeles bank robbery and murder has surrendered to the FBI, agents said Monday. "He realized we were getting closer," said Mary Hogan, the FBI agent assigned to track down Derrick Stevens. Stevens, she said, simply succumbed to the pressure of being on the run. "He was traveling, moving from place to place, and I think he got tired," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The way Tavis Smiley sees it, one challenge of being an African American broadcasting pioneer is striking a balance between reaching a broad audience and remaining, as he calls it, "authentically black." Another challenge is getting up for work at 2:30 a.m. Starting Monday, Southland listeners will get two chances a day to hear how he does it, when his 5-month-old, hourlong show debuts on KPCC-FM (89.3) and KCRW-FM (89.9).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The furor over last week's firing of "BET Tonight" host Tavis Smiley, which has prompted an avalanche of protests from his fans, has dramatically escalated, with both Smiley and BET Chairman Robert Johnson separately taking to the airwaves in the last few days to explain their sides.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his final hours as president, Bill Clinton on Saturday granted pardons to 140 Americans, including Patricia Hearst, an heiress kidnapped in the 1970s; his half-brother, Roger, who was convicted on drug charges; and Susan McDougal, who spent 18 months in jail rather than testify about the Clintons' role in the Whitewater scandal. Former Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros, ex-CIA Director John M. Deutch and former Arizona Gov. Fife Symington also received last-minute pardons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a popular Crenshaw Boulevard hot dog stand, national political commentator and talk show host Tavis Smiley was busy giving his take on success. "You can't really enjoy success unless you've had some failure," he said, jabbing a dog in the air. "It's the failures that make the successes all the more sweeter." Smiley remembers the bitter taste of failure.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two local police officers had a hot tip. A student at the nearby university had told them the picture on an FBI poster for a California fugitive wanted in a bank robbery and murder looked a lot like a man working at the campus cafeteria. The officers were greeted by Derrick Anderson, a university executive known for his congeniality, hard work and business success. Anderson said the man on the poster didn't look like him or anyone he knew, and the officers left his office.
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