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Sarah Josepha Hale

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March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Playwright Arthur Miller, author of "Death of a Salesman" and other American theater classics, has been chosen to receive the 1990 Sarah Josepha Hale Medal in a Sept. 29 ceremony in Newport, N.H. The award is named for Newport native Sarah Josepha Hale, a 19th-Century author, editor, social reformer and feminist. . . . Kirk Douglas has a big weekend scheduled in Paris.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Sue Welfringer
Did you know there was a time in American history when, little by little, we stopped celebrating Thanksgiving? It's true. By the mid-1800s, this special day of thanks was at serious risk of extinction. Fortunately for us, there was a very persistent woman named Sarah Josepha Hale who never stopped believing in Thanksgiving. Why was America giving up on Thanksgiving? By 1850, the country was very busy growing, with fifteen new states being added to the union between 1800 and 1850.
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NEWS
December 22, 1985
Re "Thanksgiving Day Marks American Spunk" (by Marshall Berges, Nov. 27), it is good for all to know how important and how much the position of women contributed to the making of this nation. However, suffragette is not a word. It was a "made-up" term/word by men to make fun of the women/suffragists so determined in their causes. Your text brought forth to readers the importance of Sarah Josepha Hale in her determination to set aside the Thursday for celebration and thank you, but when you write "suffragette," this not only diminishes the importance of the holiday, but certainly takes away the importance of the woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thanksgiving is the one holiday we generally celebrate without guilt or stress. We join family and friends to feast (no calorie counting) and there is no pressure to shop for presents. So let us remember a writer who in the mid-1800s lobbied to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. Sarah Josepha Hale (1788-1879), the author of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" and editor of Godey's Lady's Book, began pleading in editorials, and personal letters to President Lincoln for the holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2011 | By Sue Welfringer
Did you know there was a time in American history when, little by little, we stopped celebrating Thanksgiving? It's true. By the mid-1800s, this special day of thanks was at serious risk of extinction. Fortunately for us, there was a very persistent woman named Sarah Josepha Hale who never stopped believing in Thanksgiving. Why was America giving up on Thanksgiving? By 1850, the country was very busy growing, with fifteen new states being added to the union between 1800 and 1850.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Sitting down to dinner on Thursday, those giving thanks might remember Sarah Josepha Hale, author of the children's poem "Mary Had a Little Lamb." It was Hale--editor, poet, novelist and one of the most influential women in 19th-Century America--who persuaded Abraham Lincoln that Thanksgiving should be declared a national holiday.
NEWS
November 27, 1985 | MARSHALL BERGES, Times Staff Writer and Tom Lutgen of The Times ' editorial library assisted with research for this story. and
Thanksgiving . . . is the one day that is purely American. --O. Henry Now gather 'round, children, for a different story about Thanksgiving, this one involving a militant suffragette editor who campaigned much of her life to bring about a regular, nationwide Thanksgiving Day. Sarah Josepha Hale succeeded at a task where, for 250 years, others failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thanksgiving is the one holiday we generally celebrate without guilt or stress. We join family and friends to feast (no calorie counting) and there is no pressure to shop for presents. So let us remember a writer who in the mid-1800s lobbied to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. Sarah Josepha Hale (1788-1879), the author of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" and editor of Godey's Lady's Book, began pleading in editorials, and personal letters to President Lincoln for the holiday.
FOOD
November 29, 2006
THANK you for the very interesting, informative and timely article on Sarah Josepha Hale ["A Holiday to Unite the Divided," by Charles Perry, Nov. 22]. My family and I have always celebrated Thanksgiving in a big way, and we feel that it is a meaningful holiday in its own right. Sadly, the trend seems to be to gloss over it in the big commercial push for Black Friday and the merchandizing strategies geared toward Christmas. Sarah's desire for national healing and unity, as well as giving thanks for one's blessings is as pertinent now as it was 150-plus years ago. MARILEE WOOD Torrance
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1997
The first Thanksgiving was a day of gratitude, of relief, perhaps of joy. But the first Thanksgiving Day--the official, national holiday we're celebrating today--was the product of downright hectoring by Sarah Josepha Hale, a widowed mother of five who harangued presidents from John Quincy Adams to Abraham Lincoln to declare the day a holiday. It was Lincoln who finally cottoned to the idea and made the last Thursday in November the national Thanksgiving Day.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Playwright Arthur Miller, author of "Death of a Salesman" and other American theater classics, has been chosen to receive the 1990 Sarah Josepha Hale Medal in a Sept. 29 ceremony in Newport, N.H. The award is named for Newport native Sarah Josepha Hale, a 19th-Century author, editor, social reformer and feminist. . . . Kirk Douglas has a big weekend scheduled in Paris.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Sitting down to dinner on Thursday, those giving thanks might remember Sarah Josepha Hale, author of the children's poem "Mary Had a Little Lamb." It was Hale--editor, poet, novelist and one of the most influential women in 19th-Century America--who persuaded Abraham Lincoln that Thanksgiving should be declared a national holiday.
NEWS
December 22, 1985
Re "Thanksgiving Day Marks American Spunk" (by Marshall Berges, Nov. 27), it is good for all to know how important and how much the position of women contributed to the making of this nation. However, suffragette is not a word. It was a "made-up" term/word by men to make fun of the women/suffragists so determined in their causes. Your text brought forth to readers the importance of Sarah Josepha Hale in her determination to set aside the Thursday for celebration and thank you, but when you write "suffragette," this not only diminishes the importance of the holiday, but certainly takes away the importance of the woman.
NEWS
November 27, 1985 | MARSHALL BERGES, Times Staff Writer and Tom Lutgen of The Times ' editorial library assisted with research for this story. and
Thanksgiving . . . is the one day that is purely American. --O. Henry Now gather 'round, children, for a different story about Thanksgiving, this one involving a militant suffragette editor who campaigned much of her life to bring about a regular, nationwide Thanksgiving Day. Sarah Josepha Hale succeeded at a task where, for 250 years, others failed.
FOOD
November 22, 2006 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
A century and a half ago, this country was more divided than it has ever been before or since. Within a few years, division would escalate into the most murderous war in our history. Everybody saw the Civil War coming. Some prayed that it could be prevented. One who did was a very determined lady who happened to have a bully pulpit as the editor of Godey's Lady's Book, the most widely read magazine in the country.
NEWS
November 22, 2003 | Bob Bonnot, Father Bob Bonnot is a Catholic priest at St. John Baptist de la Salle Parish in Granada Hills and president of the San Fernando Valley Interfaith Council.
Pilgrim Gov. William Bradford of the Plymouth Colony surely did not intend a pluralistic feast when he proclaimed a three-day Thanksgiving celebration in October 1621. Nonetheless, that first Thanksgiving brought together the 50 (of 102) Mayflower Pilgrims who had survived their first year in America and 90 or so Wampanoag Indians. The celebration built on a relationship with the Indians that had begun only in March.
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