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Sarah Kane

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By David Ng
Some casting news is too intriguing to ignore. Cate Blanchett will team up with French film star Isabelle Huppert in a staging of Jean Genet's  "The Maids"  next year at the Sydney Theatre Company in Australia. The company unveiled its 2013 season on Thursday. "The Maids," which will be directed by Benedict Andrews, will run June 4 to July 20 in Sydney. The new English translation is by Andrews and Andrew Upton. Genet's 1947 play was inspired by the real-life story of the Papin sisters, who worked as maids and were convicted of murdering their employer.  In August, the Sydney Theatre Company said that Blanchett would be stepping down as co-artistic director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By David Ng
Some casting news is too intriguing to ignore. Cate Blanchett will team up with French film star Isabelle Huppert in a staging of Jean Genet's  "The Maids"  next year at the Sydney Theatre Company in Australia. The company unveiled its 2013 season on Thursday. "The Maids," which will be directed by Benedict Andrews, will run June 4 to July 20 in Sydney. The new English translation is by Andrews and Andrew Upton. Genet's 1947 play was inspired by the real-life story of the Papin sisters, who worked as maids and were convicted of murdering their employer.  In August, the Sydney Theatre Company said that Blanchett would be stepping down as co-artistic director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2002
In the few brief years that constituted her professional career, playwright Sarah Kane was both lionized and pilloried in British theatrical circles. Kane's plays, with their graphic scenes of sex, torture and mutilation, were decried by many as pure filth and just as passionately defended by luminaries, such as Harold Pinter, who praised the brilliance of her dark vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
There is beauty, and there is wonder, in Sarah Kane's final play, "4.48 Psychosis." Beautiful is her angry, exquisite language. Beautiful is the striking, iridescent production by Royal Court, the latest offering from the UCLA Live International Theatre Festival. But it is a terrible beauty, a terrible wonder. Surely most in the audience had an idea of what they were in for Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
There is beauty, and there is wonder, in Sarah Kane's final play, "4.48 Psychosis." Beautiful is her angry, exquisite language. Beautiful is the striking, iridescent production by Royal Court, the latest offering from the UCLA Live International Theatre Festival. But it is a terrible beauty, a terrible wonder. Surely most in the audience had an idea of what they were in for Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Sarah KANE'S public life began in a blizzard of condemnation, thanks to British theater critics' outrage at "Blasted," her grisly, taboo-breaking dramatization of everyday hatred and cruelty exploding into the horrors of war. It ended four years later, on Feb. 20, 1999, in a determined suicide two weeks after her 28th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | Charles McNulty
MARIN IRELAND ADEPT AT THE RISIBLE OR THE RADICAL Ethereal yet grounded, actor Marin Ireland is magnetically attracted to theatrical projects that are at once ineffably abstract and vulnerably flesh and blood. Patrons of South Coast Repertory had the chance to experience her eccentric comic side last spring in Richard Greenberg's "The Injured Party." But she's revealed rawer nerve endings in darkly radical plays by Caryl Churchill ("Far Away") and Sarah Kane ("4:48 Psychosis" and in this fall's critically acclaimed New York premiere of "Blasted."
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | F. Kathleen Foley
Theater On Approval--Time sure flies when you're having a wry time. "On Approval," Frederick Lonsdale's breezy, biting comedy about the English upper classes, was revived by Pacific Resident Theatre in honor of the play's 75th anniversary. It remains a delicious if insubstantial confection whipped to a fine froth by director Joe Olivieri and his deft cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
In one of the most infamous scenes in modern drama, a group of young men in a London park stone a baby to death in its carriage. What begins as roughhousing escalates to all-out sadism until a rock is thrown at point blank range, ending the child's pitiful cries for good. Edward Bond's "Saved" provoked outrage when it was produced in 1965 by the Royal Court Theatre as a private club offering, a designation used to slip past the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Although "Saved" isn't revived often, it's considered a modern classic, and not just because it was instrumental in overturning Britain's strict theater censorship laws.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004 | Mike Boehm
Sarah KANE's antiwar play "Blasted" set off a storm when it premiered in London in 1995, with early reviewers ridiculing it as "a disgusting feast of filth" and "devoid of intellectual and artistic merit." Now the play is being brought to Los Angeles for the first time by the Rude Guerrilla Theater Company, which usually operates out of a 40-seat storefront in Santa Ana.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Sarah KANE'S public life began in a blizzard of condemnation, thanks to British theater critics' outrage at "Blasted," her grisly, taboo-breaking dramatization of everyday hatred and cruelty exploding into the horrors of war. It ended four years later, on Feb. 20, 1999, in a determined suicide two weeks after her 28th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2002
In the few brief years that constituted her professional career, playwright Sarah Kane was both lionized and pilloried in British theatrical circles. Kane's plays, with their graphic scenes of sex, torture and mutilation, were decried by many as pure filth and just as passionately defended by luminaries, such as Harold Pinter, who praised the brilliance of her dark vision.
NEWS
June 9, 2005 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Appearances by Shakespeare's Globe Theatre from London, the Piccolo Teatro di Milano from Italy, "No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency" author Alexander McCall Smith, French actress Isabelle Huppert, and a group of friends and performers paying tribute to the late monologuist Spalding Gray will highlight the 2005-'06 UCLA Live season. The season, announced Wednesday, will consist of 72 events or about 120 performances, compared with 66 events comprising 138 performances in 2004-'05.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2005 | CHARLES McNULTY
WHAT lingers in the memory of my mostly New York theater year -- one that no one of sound mind could possibly call vintage -- isn't a playwright's dazzling new drama or a visionary director's groundbreaking production but a passel of courageous portrayals by actors who reinvigorated familiar roles with difficult, and consequently dignifying, human truth. "Aristocrats," London's Royal National Theatre.
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