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Sarah L Catz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2000
Re "The Light-Rail Solution: Orange, Santa Ana Need to Get Aboard," by Sarah L. Catz, Jan. 16: This is right on target, a very positive and informative summary of the urgent need for transportation alternatives and the political obstacles encountered in Orange County. The success for an Orange County rail system will have to be the result of a bipartisan political push, really bad traffic (which we already have) and the right combination of a road and rail package (which we also have)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
I read with interest the column by Sarah L. Catz, public member of the Orange County Transportation Authority Board of Directors ("CenterLine Was Right, So What Went Wrong?" March 25). I also am a proponent of OCTA's proposed CenterLine light-rail project. Catz summarizes very well my frustration with how the CenterLine efforts proceeded. I especially felt stymied in my attempts to network with other segments of the community that support light rail. Part of this may be due to the fact that many OCTA staff chose to remain neutral about CenterLine in their public dealings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998
I agree with David Mootchnik about the need for public involvement in Orange County transportation decisions (Orange County Voices, Dec. 6). Unfortunately, some of the information necessary to create an informed public debate was missing from his column. For the record: The Orange County Transportation Authority board of directors has approved a financing plan for a rail project that would not require an increase in taxes to build and operate the 28-mile system. The financing plan isolates funding for rail operations from bus operations, ensuring that the bus system will not be adversely affected by a light rail system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001
Re "CenterLine Was Right, So What Went Wrong?" Orange County Voices, March 25: I am appalled at the article written by Sarah L. Catz. She indicates hundreds of meetings and public hearings regarding the light rail. Perhaps residents in parts of Irvine were privy to this, but like most residents in Oak Creek, I was caught off guard. I did a door-to-door a month ago, and not one person knew about the proposed light rail running through Oak Creek. I also read the environmental study the OCTA had commissioned that indicated the visual impact to Oak Creek was minimal.
OPINION
February 16, 1997
As a longtime Dodger season-ticket holder and the immediate past chairwoman of Southern California's MetroLink commuter rail Board of Directors, I couldn't agree more with William Fulton's "Connect the Stadium to the City" (Opinion, Jan. 26). I, too, would like to see baseball--as well as other sports and entertainment activities--become part of a positive urban experience in Los Angeles. And I believe MetroLink's mission of providing reasonable and accessible transit can play an important role in doing so. After all, it's less than a 10-minute bus ride from our Union Station stop to Dodger Stadium and about the same distance, via MTA's electric rail system, to the Convention Center site proposed for a new Lakers and Kings venue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sarah L. Catz remembers taking the bus to the beach and the shopping centers of Los Angeles hen she was a teenager. As a college student in Washington, D.C., the subway became her mode of transportation. Today, it's the Red Line and the Metrolink and Amtrak trains that take her to Los Angeles for meetings or lunch with her parents. For getting around in Orange County, however, Catz drives her car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
I read with interest the column by Sarah L. Catz, public member of the Orange County Transportation Authority Board of Directors ("CenterLine Was Right, So What Went Wrong?" March 25). I also am a proponent of OCTA's proposed CenterLine light-rail project. Catz summarizes very well my frustration with how the CenterLine efforts proceeded. I especially felt stymied in my attempts to network with other segments of the community that support light rail. Part of this may be due to the fact that many OCTA staff chose to remain neutral about CenterLine in their public dealings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Sarah L. Catz, 36, a Laguna Beach lawyer, was chosen Monday as the public's representative on the Orange County Transportation Authority board of directors. Catz succeeds Newport Beach lawyer Dana W. Reed, who resigned effective Aug. 1 to devote more time to his politically influential law firm in the upcoming election year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001
Re "CenterLine Was Right, So What Went Wrong?" Orange County Voices, March 25: I am appalled at the article written by Sarah L. Catz. She indicates hundreds of meetings and public hearings regarding the light rail. Perhaps residents in parts of Irvine were privy to this, but like most residents in Oak Creek, I was caught off guard. I did a door-to-door a month ago, and not one person knew about the proposed light rail running through Oak Creek. I also read the environmental study the OCTA had commissioned that indicated the visual impact to Oak Creek was minimal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Ask people to help solve Orange County's daunting traffic problems and what do you get? Sixty-eight people who are competing to fill a vacancy on the powerful Orange County Transportation Authority board. The agency oversees more than $500 million in spending on traffic improvements and sets the county's highway and transit priorities. Among the most identifiable contenders who filed by the 5 p.m. deadline on Thursday were attorney Sarah L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2000
Re "The Light-Rail Solution: Orange, Santa Ana Need to Get Aboard," by Sarah L. Catz, Jan. 16: This is right on target, a very positive and informative summary of the urgent need for transportation alternatives and the political obstacles encountered in Orange County. The success for an Orange County rail system will have to be the result of a bipartisan political push, really bad traffic (which we already have) and the right combination of a road and rail package (which we also have)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1998
I agree with David Mootchnik about the need for public involvement in Orange County transportation decisions (Orange County Voices, Dec. 6). Unfortunately, some of the information necessary to create an informed public debate was missing from his column. For the record: The Orange County Transportation Authority board of directors has approved a financing plan for a rail project that would not require an increase in taxes to build and operate the 28-mile system. The financing plan isolates funding for rail operations from bus operations, ensuring that the bus system will not be adversely affected by a light rail system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sarah L. Catz remembers taking the bus to the beach and the shopping centers of Los Angeles hen she was a teenager. As a college student in Washington, D.C., the subway became her mode of transportation. Today, it's the Red Line and the Metrolink and Amtrak trains that take her to Los Angeles for meetings or lunch with her parents. For getting around in Orange County, however, Catz drives her car.
OPINION
February 16, 1997
As a longtime Dodger season-ticket holder and the immediate past chairwoman of Southern California's MetroLink commuter rail Board of Directors, I couldn't agree more with William Fulton's "Connect the Stadium to the City" (Opinion, Jan. 26). I, too, would like to see baseball--as well as other sports and entertainment activities--become part of a positive urban experience in Los Angeles. And I believe MetroLink's mission of providing reasonable and accessible transit can play an important role in doing so. After all, it's less than a 10-minute bus ride from our Union Station stop to Dodger Stadium and about the same distance, via MTA's electric rail system, to the Convention Center site proposed for a new Lakers and Kings venue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Sarah L. Catz, 36, a Laguna Beach lawyer, was chosen Monday as the public's representative on the Orange County Transportation Authority board of directors. Catz succeeds Newport Beach lawyer Dana W. Reed, who resigned effective Aug. 1 to devote more time to his politically influential law firm in the upcoming election year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Ask people to help solve Orange County's daunting traffic problems and what do you get? Sixty-eight people who are competing to fill a vacancy on the powerful Orange County Transportation Authority board. The agency oversees more than $500 million in spending on traffic improvements and sets the county's highway and transit priorities. Among the most identifiable contenders who filed by the 5 p.m. deadline on Thursday were attorney Sarah L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Denis R. Bilodeau was selected Monday as an alternate board member of the Orange County Transportation Authority. Bilodeau, 33, of Orange, will substitute for director Gregory T. Winterbottom when Winterbottom cannot attend meetings. Winterbottom was appointed to succeed Sarah L. Catz as the board's public member. The changes take effect Jan. 16. Bilodeau is a traffic division manager at TRC, an engineering firm based in Orange.
NEWS
October 16, 1987
Jay S.H. Masserman has been installed as president of Jewish Family Service of Orange County. Masserman, an Orange County obstetrician-gynecologist, succeeds former president H. Henry Hirsh. Other officers installed for the 1987-88 year are Andrew M. Pieter, first vice president; Sarah L. Catz, second vice president; Sandra Fineston, treasurer, and Marjorie Austin, secretary.
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