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Sarah Polley

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September 10, 2012 | By John Horn
Roadside Attractions has picked up domestic distribution rights to Sarah Polley's quasi-documentary "Stories We Tell" at the Toronto International Film Festival, the company announced Monday. The film, which also screened at festivals in Venice and Telluride, Colo., traces Polley's discovery of a family secret. The film, which Polley discusses in  this blog post,  has generated strong festival reviews. Roadside said it planned to release the film early next year.  "I'm not a tortured artist in any way," Polley said in Toronto.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When the Nobel Prize in Literature was announced Thursday morning, literary Twitter flowed in three general veins: congratulations for the much-admired Alice Munro, the new Nobel laureate; wry commentary on how the prize is talked about in Western media outlets; and warm jokes, including the inevitable twerking. The applause came from many quarters: Bestselling novelist @jodipicoult : Love, love, LOVE that #AliceMunro won the #Nobel. Booker Prize-winning novelist @SalmanRushdie : Many congrats to Alice Munro.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Sarah Polley's documentary "Stories We Tell" has been lauded by critics for its invigorating storytelling and the compelling way it unveils a deep-seated family secret. (Spoilers ahead.) But many viewers say they feel particularly energized by the movie once they catch on to a filmmaking secret: Polley mixed home movies and other archival material with new footage of actors playing her family members in many of the scenes. Though Polley contends that she didn't set out to confound audience members  - leaving them questioning what was real and what was re-created - the need for footage did lend itself to the broader theme of the film, which was to examine how we construct stories out of our experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
In Sarah Polley's unconventional documentary, "Stories We Tell," "truth" is a relative term when family secrets are involved. The Canadian actress-writer-director's quest is resolving her parentage. Did she have another father, as childhood teasing suggested, in addition to the beloved Michael Polley, who raised her and thought her his own? Her mother, Diane, died when Polley was 11. Had she lived, perhaps Polley would have had the answer long ago and the film left uncontemplated. In Diane's absence, everyone has opinions - family members, her mother's friends and lovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2008
IT was good to see a picture of Sarah Polley as the young director of "Away From Her" ["A New Generation," Feb. 17] but mystifying to read that she was "known mostly for acting in low-budget indie films" when those who saw her as the delightful 10-year-old Sally Salt in Terry Gilliam's "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" will never forget her charming presence, for which she received a best young actress nomination from the Young Artist Foundation....
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010
Among Sarah Polley's early acting jobs was Terry Gilliam's "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen." She continued to act throughout her adolescence on such television series as the PBS program "Ramona" and Disney's "Avonlea." As an adult, she has appeared in Atom Egoyan's "The Sweet Hereafter," Doug Liman's "Go" and Kathryn Bigelow's "The Weight of Water." In 2006, she directed Julie Christie in "Away From Her," for which Polley earned an Academy Award nomination for adapted screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Sarah Polley had just arrived in Los Angeles after stepping off a plane from her native Canada, but she was already feeling out of place in Hollywood. Late last month, she sat on the patio of a massive hotel suite reserved for Joel Silver, the producer of her new film, "Splice," gawking at the luxe surroundings. "Whenever I come to L.A., I always feel like I'm not wearing the right thing or I haven't got the right haircut or I'm not wearing the right makeup," she said, looking down at her plain cargo pants and sneakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Two days after her 11th birthday, Sarah Polley lost her mother to cancer. The death came as a shock, even though her father and older siblings had watched Diane Polley battle the disease for months. As she grew up in Toronto under the care of her father, Michael, Polley's conception of her mother was fuzzily constructed from memories, photographs and family stories. Nevertheless, she followed her mother's footsteps into acting, taking to the Canadian stage as a child and at 18 catching the attention of U.S. audiences after her role in "The Sweet Hereafter.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Polley, who plays Sara Stanley on the Disney series "Avonlea," is not the sort of actress who counts the number of lines she has in each script. In fact, throughout the five seasons of the show based on Lucy Maud Montgomery's children stories, Polley has asked to be in fewer and fewer shows. Next season, at her request, she'll only be in one episode of "Avonlea."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | Lael Loewenstein, Special to The Times
There may be no young actress today better at embodying a blend of wounded innocence and stoic pride than Sarah Polley. In "The Secret Life of Words," she has a part worthy of her gifts. Polley drew international acclaim as an accident victim in Atom Egoyan's 1997 "The Sweet Hereafter." Since then, she has resolutely refused big-budget films -- and, despite her beauty, magazine covers -- instead choosing the hard-core indie path.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Sarah Polley's documentary "Stories We Tell" has been lauded by critics for its invigorating storytelling and the compelling way it unveils a deep-seated family secret. (Spoilers ahead.) But many viewers say they feel particularly energized by the movie once they catch on to a filmmaking secret: Polley mixed home movies and other archival material with new footage of actors playing her family members in many of the scenes. Though Polley contends that she didn't set out to confound audience members  - leaving them questioning what was real and what was re-created - the need for footage did lend itself to the broader theme of the film, which was to examine how we construct stories out of our experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Don't be fooled by its deceptively simple title or the hesitant, unassuming way it begins. Writer-director Sarah Polley's "Stories We Tell" ends up an invigorating powerhouse of a personal documentary, adventurous and absolutely fascinating. Unexpectedly moving in unanticipated ways, this unusual film is a look at the complexities of one specific family's story as well as a broad examination of the interlocking nature of truth, secrecy and memory, not to mention the endless intricacies of human relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Two days after her 11th birthday, Sarah Polley lost her mother to cancer. The death came as a shock, even though her father and older siblings had watched Diane Polley battle the disease for months. As she grew up in Toronto under the care of her father, Michael, Polley's conception of her mother was fuzzily constructed from memories, photographs and family stories. Nevertheless, she followed her mother's footsteps into acting, taking to the Canadian stage as a child and at 18 catching the attention of U.S. audiences after her role in "The Sweet Hereafter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Toronto - Lionsgate is on a buying spree. The company known most recently for its "Hunger Game" franchise has scooped up four new titles from the Toronto International Film Festival in the last 24 hours. In conjunction with its partner, Roadside Attractions, the studio has purchased Joss Whedon's "Much Ado About Nothing," the sex-addiction comedy "Thanks for Sharing," "Imogene," starring Kristen Wiig and Sarah Polley's documentary "The Stories We Tell. " All four films generated interest from a variety of buyers, but Lionsgate appears to be the most aggressive at this year's confab.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2012 | By John Horn
Roadside Attractions has picked up domestic distribution rights to Sarah Polley's quasi-documentary "Stories We Tell" at the Toronto International Film Festival, the company announced Monday. The film, which also screened at festivals in Venice and Telluride, Colo., traces Polley's discovery of a family secret. The film, which Polley discusses in  this blog post,  has generated strong festival reviews. Roadside said it planned to release the film early next year.  "I'm not a tortured artist in any way," Polley said in Toronto.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is so much that is delicate and soft, so much that is hurtful and hard about love when filmmaker Sarah Polley gets her hands on it. She has done it yet again in "Take This Waltz," which stars Michelle Williams, Luke Kirby and Seth Rogen in the story of the death of a marriage and the emotional dance it took to get there. Williams, in yet another head-turning role, is 28-year-old Margot. She is almost five years into a playful relationship with husband Lou (Rogen), an author-chef working on a cookbook devoted to chicken (there's a point being made)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1999 | JOHN CLARK, John Clark is regular contributor to Calendar
In a candid moment, actress Sarah Polley, last year's It Girl at the Sundance Film Festival, admits to being what she calls an inverted snob. By this she means that she thinks acting is a useless profession and actors take themselves way too seriously. But then there's a point at which she realizes that she's taking too seriously the whole issue of actors taking the business too seriously. "Why is what you do any more important than someone driving a bus?" she says earnestly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Actress Sarah Polley's breakthrough feature as director and screenwriter, 2006's "Away From Her," an examination of an older couple grappling with the realities of aging, earned her an Oscar nomination for adapted screenplay. Her new directorial effort,"Take This Waltz," which opens in Los Angeles on Friday and is already available on video on demand, concerns a love triangle of people at the other end of their lives struggling to settle into who they are going to be as they mature.
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