Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSarah Siddons
IN THE NEWS

Sarah Siddons

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
England may not have had much in the way of memorable new theater at the end of the 18th century, but it did claim an unusually memorable theatrical personality. Her name was Sarah Siddons, and the invocation of that name circa 1800 was akin to saying the name of the most celebrated movie star today. The British actress is mostly known to general audiences now as a footnote from Joseph L. Mankiewicz's classic 1950 movie, "All About Eve," in which her likeness adorned an eponymous Broadway award.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1999
Music Closing the 78th Hollywood Bowl summer season, John Mauceri and his Hollywood Bowl Orchestra put on their "Party of the Century" to celebrate the millennium. Guest stars appearing with the orchestra will include Alan Cumming, performing excerpts from "Cabaret"; veteran movie dancer Ann Miller; Welsh vocal prodigy Charlotte Church; and comedian Lea DeLaria. This celebration will go on for three nights, Friday and Saturday at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7:30 p.m., $3 to $100. (323) 850-2000.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Hysteria, weeping, fainting spells by the dozen: Drury Lane theater audiences, among others, flocked to see the English tragic actress Sarah Siddons (1755-1831) in order to be wrecked, enthralled, destroyed, ennobled. A playgoer wrote of one performance that the "greater part of the spectators were too ill themselves to use their hands in her applause." Acting to swoon over--literally.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Hysteria, weeping, fainting spells by the dozen: Drury Lane theater audiences, among others, flocked to see the English tragic actress Sarah Siddons (1755-1831) in order to be wrecked, enthralled, destroyed, ennobled. A playgoer wrote of one performance that the "greater part of the spectators were too ill themselves to use their hands in her applause." Acting to swoon over--literally.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Madonna! O.J.! Diana! Monica! No sooner does one star begin to fade than another emerges at the center of yet another media frenzy. Drawn from the arts, entertainment, sports and the halls of world power, the cast of characters goes on and on, perpetually pushing the limits of what's fit to print or televise and raising questions about boundaries between public and private life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1995 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It might authenticate a Rembrandt or expose an impostor. It proved Blue Boy once had a dog. It showed theatrical grand dame Sarah Siddons was painted lounging on a burnished wood throne with a chubby, winged cherub fluttering at its base. The X-ray machine is not just for the doctor or the dentist. Across the United States, museums have invested thousands in the decades-old technology to take stripped-down portraits of paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1999
Music Closing the 78th Hollywood Bowl summer season, John Mauceri and his Hollywood Bowl Orchestra put on their "Party of the Century" to celebrate the millennium. Guest stars appearing with the orchestra will include Alan Cumming, performing excerpts from "Cabaret"; veteran movie dancer Ann Miller; Welsh vocal prodigy Charlotte Church; and comedian Lea DeLaria. This celebration will go on for three nights, Friday and Saturday at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7:30 p.m., $3 to $100. (323) 850-2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1999
It's hard to imagine Nicole Kidman hiring Robert Rauschenberg to help publicize "Eyes Wide Shut," but that is essentially what popular British actress Sarah Siddons did in the 18th century in hiring Sir Joshua Reynolds and others to promote her acting career. The J.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's a bit of a stretch to equate several period art exhibits in Los Angeles with the adventures of fame and celebrityhood in today's 24-hour high-tech media. Yet the connection is too close to ignore. At the J. Paul Getty Museum is "Nadar/Warhol: Paris/New York," which finds parallel trends in the portrait photography of the Frenchman Nadar (1820-1910) and American painter Andy Warhol (1928-1987).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Siddons Society Selects Swit: Loretta Swit has been named Chicago's Actress of the Year by the Sarah Siddons Society and will be honored at the group's annual gala later this year. Swit spent three months in Chicago starring in "Shirley Valentine."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's a bit of a stretch to equate several period art exhibits in Los Angeles with the adventures of fame and celebrityhood in today's 24-hour high-tech media. Yet the connection is too close to ignore. At the J. Paul Getty Museum is "Nadar/Warhol: Paris/New York," which finds parallel trends in the portrait photography of the Frenchman Nadar (1820-1910) and American painter Andy Warhol (1928-1987).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
England may not have had much in the way of memorable new theater at the end of the 18th century, but it did claim an unusually memorable theatrical personality. Her name was Sarah Siddons, and the invocation of that name circa 1800 was akin to saying the name of the most celebrated movie star today. The British actress is mostly known to general audiences now as a footnote from Joseph L. Mankiewicz's classic 1950 movie, "All About Eve," in which her likeness adorned an eponymous Broadway award.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1999
It's hard to imagine Nicole Kidman hiring Robert Rauschenberg to help publicize "Eyes Wide Shut," but that is essentially what popular British actress Sarah Siddons did in the 18th century in hiring Sir Joshua Reynolds and others to promote her acting career. The J.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Madonna! O.J.! Diana! Monica! No sooner does one star begin to fade than another emerges at the center of yet another media frenzy. Drawn from the arts, entertainment, sports and the halls of world power, the cast of characters goes on and on, perpetually pushing the limits of what's fit to print or televise and raising questions about boundaries between public and private life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1995 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It might authenticate a Rembrandt or expose an impostor. It proved Blue Boy once had a dog. It showed theatrical grand dame Sarah Siddons was painted lounging on a burnished wood throne with a chubby, winged cherub fluttering at its base. The X-ray machine is not just for the doctor or the dentist. Across the United States, museums have invested thousands in the decades-old technology to take stripped-down portraits of paintings.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|