Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSarah Steele
IN THE NEWS

Sarah Steele

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Director Nicole Holofcener tends to use ordinary encounters to examine what people value in life, and she's at it again in her incisive new comedy, "Please Give," a clever dissection of liberal guilt and the notion that money equals charity, which it does and it doesn't. Catherine Keener, a favorite of the filmmaker, is a New Yorker of some means who can't give away money fast enough to strangers but fails to see what her own daughter (Sarah Steele) needs. There are complicating and mitigating factors as the lives of two families intersect over the annexation of an apartment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Director Nicole Holofcener tends to use ordinary encounters to examine what people value in life, and she's at it again in her incisive new comedy, "Please Give," a clever dissection of liberal guilt and the notion that money equals charity, which it does and it doesn't. Catherine Keener, a favorite of the filmmaker, is a New Yorker of some means who can't give away money fast enough to strangers but fails to see what her own daughter (Sarah Steele) needs. There are complicating and mitigating factors as the lives of two families intersect over the annexation of an apartment.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Susan King
Sarah Steele has a "huge" problem performing a script "I don't believe would happen. As an actress it's very crucial that I actually believe that a character exists." So the 16-year-old actress, a junior at a private Philadelphia high school, "definitely had my doubts about myself as an actress. Then honestly, with just sheer dumb luck, I got this." "This" is the role of Bernice, the sweet, overweight daughter of Tea Leoni and Adam Sandler in James L. Brooks' comedy-drama "Spanglish."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Susan King
Sarah Steele has a "huge" problem performing a script "I don't believe would happen. As an actress it's very crucial that I actually believe that a character exists." So the 16-year-old actress, a junior at a private Philadelphia high school, "definitely had my doubts about myself as an actress. Then honestly, with just sheer dumb luck, I got this." "This" is the role of Bernice, the sweet, overweight daughter of Tea Leoni and Adam Sandler in James L. Brooks' comedy-drama "Spanglish."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
A comic drama about the way we live now, "Spanglish" is a film as contemporary as its title by a writer-director with a well-established gift for showing us who we are. It gives us ideas to chew on, moments to laugh at and performances to admire, but, like so many current lives, it is also somewhat in disarray, not always equal to its admirable intentions and the grace of its most successful aspects.
SPORTS
March 23, 2006 | Dan Arritt; Martin Henderson; Lauren Peterson
BASEBALL MICHAEL CATANESO Jr., Victorville Victor Valley * Then: Started playing T-ball when he was 5 and picked up his first golf club about a year later. He continued playing youth baseball in the area while honing his golf skills as a member of Apple Valley Country Club. He faced a tough decision entering high school, as boys' golf and baseball are spring sports, so he chose to play both.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
You can count on summer movies for one sure thing - a teenager will fumble through his or her first sexual experience. On-screen, I mean. Because so many boys have done it so boldly, reveling in their risky business and risqué language - a low bar set long ago by the likes of "American Pie" and "Porky's" - the girls were overdue for some score-settling. For that there is the new coming-of-age comedy "The To Do List. " PHOTOS: Summer Sneaks 2013 The film stars Aubrey Plaza as Brandy, the bookish valedictorian on a brash quest to experience all the unmentionables in the summer before college.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
You always know where you are in a Nicole Holofcener film, and that's the here and now. No American writer-director has her exact sense of the way some of us live today, not to mention her ability to precisely calibrate the effects she's after. With her new film, the poignant and funny "Please Give," Holofcener is at the top of her game. From her debut, "Walking and Talking," through "Lovely & Amazing" and her most recent, "Friends With Money," Holofcener has always been a piercing and amusing observer of life's anxieties and discontents, illuminating how we make our way through the tangle of dissatisfactions that confront us at every turn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Ari Karpel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Movie history is filled with colorful, career-defining relationships between an auteur and his muse — think John Ford and John Wayne; Woody Allen and Diane Keaton (or Mia Farrow, for that matter); and more recently, Pedro Almodóvar and Penélope Cruz. With their fourth collaboration, "Please Give," opening in theaters Friday, writer-director Nicole Holofcener and Catherine Keener — the star of every one of Holofcener's movies — have solidified their place on that list.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|