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HOME & GARDEN
December 15, 2005 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
SO you've arrived. Good career, clean credit, growing family. It's time for a better house, which for most people means a bigger one. Watch out, says author and architect Sarah Susanka. "They can be bigger without being better." In the last eight years, Susanka, 48, has become a kind of mini-industry on what she calls the "not so big house."
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HOME & GARDEN
December 15, 2005 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
SO you've arrived. Good career, clean credit, growing family. It's time for a better house, which for most people means a bigger one. Watch out, says author and architect Sarah Susanka. "They can be bigger without being better." In the last eight years, Susanka, 48, has become a kind of mini-industry on what she calls the "not so big house."
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REAL ESTATE
November 10, 2002 | Robert J. Bruss, Special to The Times
If you plan to build a new home or remodel your existing residence, first spend time studying author Sarah Susanka's "Not So Big Solutions for Your Home." In her latest book, Susanka emphasizes modest home component features rather than the big, lavish designs that many other architects seem to favor. "This book is a training manual for those who want to learn how to tailor their homes to fit their lifestyles," the author begins.
REAL ESTATE
November 10, 2002 | Robert J. Bruss, Special to The Times
If you plan to build a new home or remodel your existing residence, first spend time studying author Sarah Susanka's "Not So Big Solutions for Your Home." In her latest book, Susanka emphasizes modest home component features rather than the big, lavish designs that many other architects seem to favor. "This book is a training manual for those who want to learn how to tailor their homes to fit their lifestyles," the author begins.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | LAURA BAENEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Architect Sarah Susanka has a few catch phrases that leave little doubt of what she thinks about the 4,000-square-foot homes many families are building. She calls them "starter castles" and "Sheetrock barns." Susanka has taken a sabbatical from her Minneapolis architecture firm to spread her message that today's smaller families don't need homes with grand foyers and master baths the size of some bedrooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Martha Groves
Nearing completion after five years of construction in the hills of Bel-Air, Chateau des Fleurs looms like some super-sized Hollywood notion of dynastic France. From the street, the two-story mansion on three acres - where Stone Canyon and Bellagio roads converge south of the Hotel Bel-Air, across from the fourth fairway of the Bel-Air Country Club - is largely obscured by fences, trees and equipment. A better view is available from an ungated lawn on nearby Siena Way, where an observer can peer down on the palatial, U-shaped residence with its Versailles-inspired mansard roof and dormer windows and ponder: Just how much house does a family need?
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | Washington Post
Something funny happened on the way to the suburban dream: Families got smaller and houses got bigger. That should leave us living in the lap of luxury. And yet. Amid two-story foyers, cavernous great rooms for teenage sprawl, and kitchens big enough for Rollerblading, a nagging question has arisen: Is huge the same as luxurious? At a moment of maximum mansion creep, the answer is worth knowing. Thirty years ago, houses averaged 1,500 square feet. Now that figure is 2,200 square feet.
REAL ESTATE
November 18, 2007 | Kathy Price-Robinson, Special to The Times
Remodeling contractors can be infuriating, especially when they stand in your house and respond to your ideas by saying things such as: "That's really going to cost you." Or: "There's going to be maintenance issues with that." You might reply with a simple: "Thanks for stopping by," but what you're really screaming inside is more on the lines of: "You're supposed to help me realize my dreams, not kill them!"
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | BETH DONOVAN, WASHINGTON POST
When Julie and William Heflin moved into a spacious new home last year, the four children were tucked into only two of the house's six bedrooms. Close quarters, the parents figured, would foster life lessons in sharing and cooperation. "My husband's one of 13 children," Julie Heflin said. "For him, it's a matter of principle for the kids to share, and they don't mind." On weekends, she said, their three boys and one girl, ages 11 to 4, sometimes pile into one bedroom.
HOME & GARDEN
May 26, 2005 | Craig Nakano, Times Staff Writer
American culture may be obsessed with youth, but when it comes to residential architecture in the 21st century, a hot trend is old age -- and how to design for it. The realities of growing elderly surfaced repeatedly at the American Institute of Architects national convention, which closed here Saturday.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | LAURA BAENEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Architect Sarah Susanka has a few catch phrases that leave little doubt of what she thinks about the 4,000-square-foot homes many families are building. She calls them "starter castles" and "Sheetrock barns." Susanka has taken a sabbatical from her Minneapolis architecture firm to spread her message that today's smaller families don't need homes with grand foyers and master baths the size of some bedrooms.
HOME & GARDEN
September 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
After decades of ever-rising square footage in the McMansions that dot the suburbs, the idea of downsizing is gaining champions. The size of the average new single-family home has gone from 1,520 square feet in 1971 to 2,120 square feet in 1996, according to "1998 Housing Facts, Figures and Trends," published by the National Assn. of Home Builders. The median price of a typical new home has almost tripled from $48,800 in 1977 to $144,500 in 1997, according to the NAHB.
HOME & GARDEN
January 6, 2005 | Pamm Higgins, Special to The Times
We did not opt for "eco-conscious" design to appease our preservationist neighbors. We did it to lighten the decision-making load and lessen our guilt over axing seven elderly trees. Before earth movers can sink their claws into our future home site on the north tip of Half Moon Bay, guys with chain saws must whack down a thicket of 100-foot-tall Monterey pines. We're told that they're sick, infested with beetles. An arborist confirms the diagnosis, and a county planner agrees.
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