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Sarah Tueting

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NEWS
August 24, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jennifer Capriati overpowered Jelena Dokic, 6-4, 6-3, to reach the semifinals of the Pilot Pen Classic at New Haven, Conn. Capriati, seeded second, served 10 aces, including three in a row at more than 100 mph. Rain forced postponement of the quarterfinal match between defending champion Venus Williams and Justine Henin of Belgium. The match was rescheduled for this afternoon and Capriati will play the winner at night. No. 4 Kim Clijsters of Belgium advanced to the semifinals with a 6-2, 6-2 victory over Nathalie Tauziat of France.
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NEWS
August 24, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jennifer Capriati overpowered Jelena Dokic, 6-4, 6-3, to reach the semifinals of the Pilot Pen Classic at New Haven, Conn. Capriati, seeded second, served 10 aces, including three in a row at more than 100 mph. Rain forced postponement of the quarterfinal match between defending champion Venus Williams and Justine Henin of Belgium. The match was rescheduled for this afternoon and Capriati will play the winner at night. No. 4 Kim Clijsters of Belgium advanced to the semifinals with a 6-2, 6-2 victory over Nathalie Tauziat of France.
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SPORTS
August 19, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Sarah Tueting had her life neatly mapped out. She planned to end her hockey career at the 1998 Nagano Games, in which the U.S. women's team won the first Olympic women's tournament, then finish her premed studies at Dartmouth and follow her brother to medical school. "I thought I was going to walk away," said Tueting, who stopped 21 shots in Team USA's 3-1 victory over Canada in the Nagano final. "I was the gold medal-winning goalie on the team that won the first gold medal.
SPORTS
August 19, 2001 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Sarah Tueting had her life neatly mapped out. She planned to end her hockey career at the 1998 Nagano Games, in which the U.S. women's team won the first Olympic women's tournament, then finish her premed studies at Dartmouth and follow her brother to medical school. "I thought I was going to walk away," said Tueting, who stopped 21 shots in Team USA's 3-1 victory over Canada in the Nagano final. "I was the gold medal-winning goalie on the team that won the first gold medal.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Not everybody looks good in a red, white and blue Uncle Sam hat. Teeter does. She makes an entrance carrying a bouquet of flowers and modeling a floppy-topped hat made of foam, bestowed by an older brother. They go beautifully with her Olympic gold medal. There she is, Ms. America. Coming soon to a Wheaties box near you, Sarah Tueting. "Teeting," is how you pronounce it. Teeter to her friends.
SPORTS
February 5, 2002 | J.A. Adande
The United States won the first Olympic competition in Nagano, and this time the Americans will have their home fans to support them. Cammi Granato earned the honor of carrying the American flag in the 1998 closing ceremony. Look for the de facto queen of American women's hockey to carry the United States team in Salt Lake City. She will have plenty of support from the likes of Kaite King, Krissy Wendell and Jenny Potter. Goaltenders Sara DeCosta and Sarah Tueting are both effective.
SPORTS
December 21, 1997 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Goaltender Erin Whitten--the first woman to record a victory in a professional hockey game and a six-time U.S. national team selection--and longtime national team members Kelly O'Leary and Stephanie O'Sullivan were cut Saturday from the roster for the Nagano Olympics. Whitten, 26, was edged out by Sara DeCosta, 20, and Sarah Tueting, 21. The latter two each had two pre-Olympic victories over Canada--the U.S. team's top rival--but Whitten lost her last three starts against Canada.
SPORTS
February 8, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've had all their lives to dream of this moment and five months to count the days until it would become reality. So Sunday, the first U.S. women's Olympic hockey team took to the ice against China for a game that made history--and is likely to make the players role models, not only for countless young girls, but for anyone with an adventurous spirit.
SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its third game, the U.S. women's hockey team finally will get its first real test. Finland, seeded third behind Canada and the United States in the inaugural women's tournament, will provide the stiffest challenge the U.S. has yet faced. Confident after shredding China's defense, 5-0, and fending off Sweden's physical play in a 7-1 victory, the U.S. players feel prepared tonight at Aqua Wing to face a skillful team that has given them some nervous moments in exhibition games.
SPORTS
June 30, 2000 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all started innocuously enough for Jessica Bernal. "We went for skating lessons," said Ilene Bernal, Jessica's mother. "She kept asking, 'When do I get to play ice hockey?' We finally put her in a summer league and it just kept snowballing from there." All the way to boys' teams, girls' teams and national camps for elite junior players, where participation is by invitation only.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Not everybody looks good in a red, white and blue Uncle Sam hat. Teeter does. She makes an entrance carrying a bouquet of flowers and modeling a floppy-topped hat made of foam, bestowed by an older brother. They go beautifully with her Olympic gold medal. There she is, Ms. America. Coming soon to a Wheaties box near you, Sarah Tueting. "Teeting," is how you pronounce it. Teeter to her friends.
SPORTS
February 18, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
It took members of the U.S. women's Olympic hockey team so long to win their gold medals, they weren't about to let those medals out of their sight. Most players settled for simply sleeping with the medal, but one had a different way of appreciating it. "I kissed it. I checked and I bit it. It's real," forward Jennifer Schmidgall said. WE TRIED TO CALL, BUT THE LINE WAS, UH, BUSY.
SPORTS
January 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
For nearly two decades, the hierarchy in international women's hockey has remained the same: Canada and the United States sit on top in remarkable equilibrium, with the rest of the world far below. Don't expect that to change at the Turin Games, where the Canadians and the Americans are strong favorites to face off in their third straight gold medal game.
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