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Sarah Vaughan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990
What heavenly music Coming from on high It's Gabriel Satchmo and Sarah the Divine. MARY STILO Encino
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HOME & GARDEN
August 25, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Former professional hockey player Russ Courtnall and his wife, actress Paris Vaughan, have listed their home in Thousand Oaks for sale at $8.5 million. The Lake Sherwood house, completed in 2010, has 8,450 square feet on a single level. The modern Mediterranean features two offices, a temperature-controlled wine cellar, a home theater and a master suite with dual bathrooms and dual closets. There are five bedrooms and seven bathrooms. The 1.4 acres includes an infinity pool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic
Too often in recent years, one singer after another has been tossed prematurely into the record marketplace, touted as the next Sarah Vaughan or the upcoming Ella Fitzgerald. More often than not, these artists are too young and immature for prime time and the attendant hype. The case of Nnenna Freelon (despite the spelling, pronounced "Nee-na") is somewhat different. About 35, she has spent most of her adult life in North Carolina, raising a family and working locally.
NEWS
December 13, 2005
"Key Largo" -- The Downloads column in Saturday's Calendar section misspelled the surname of singer Sarah Vaughan as Vaughn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The call came late in the evening, bearing news many of us had long feared we would soon hear: Sarah Vaughan was gone, dead of lung cancer at 66. There was a strange, sad irony to the timing, for on the previous day she had been scheduled to make a recording session.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Friday was a big day for Sarah Vaughan. Mayor Tom Bradley presented her with a proclamation citing the date as "Sarah Vaughan Day" in Los Angeles, and she opened a two-day stint with Marty Paich and the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl. The honor was well-deserved. Vaughan has been a major jazz performer for most of her 45 years in the business.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
If Sarah Vaughan has any faults at all, they are a tendency toward silliness and overdramatization, but Sunday at El Camino College's Marsee Auditorium, the great jazz singer left her excesses at home and treated listeners to a deliciously understated evening of music making marked by relaxation and subtlety. In the on-going battle of less versus more, chalk another one up for less.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Vaughan, whose remarkable range and smoky contralto voice earned her the nickname "The Divine One," has died of lung cancer, it was announced Wednesday. She was 66. Miss Vaughan, who had checked out of Cedars Sinai Hospital a few hours earlier, died at 9:20 p.m. Tuesday at her home in Hidden Hills, according to her attorney and manager, Harold Levy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
How many singers can attract 35,000 people during two nights at the Hollywood Bowl, then return six weeks later and fill 12,904 seats? As a replacement for the ailing Ella Fitzgerald on Wednesday evening, Sarah Vaughan showed that her box-office strength matches her vocal power.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Pianist John Hammond deserves a medal from west San Fernando Valley music fans for his continuing efforts to bring first-rate jazz to the area. His too-brief tenure several years ago at Fitzgerald's in the Hilton Woodland Hills attracted an impressive lineup of the Southland's finest jazz talent. Now he's in the process of establishing yet another, though very different, jazz-west outpost in the seemingly unlikely environs of Sherman Way in Canoga Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Jackie Ryan "This Heart of Mine" (OpenArt Records) *** 1/2 The San Francisco-based singer is still far too little known, and it's hard to understand why. With guests saxophonist Ernie Watts and harmonica artist Toots Thielemans paralleling her sumptuous vocal lines, Ryan presents a 14-song program displaying the length and breadth of her skills. She sings "Estate" in the original Italian, soaring up from gorgeous low tones to sweeping high notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
SARAH VAUGHAN "I Love Brazil" Pablo * * * * * This masterful collection, recorded in Rio in 1977, brings together the timeless beauty of Vaughan's sound with some of the most durable writers and musicians in the Brazilian pantheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
"SASSY: THE LIFE OF SARAH VAUGHAN" By Leslie Gourse, Scribner's ($25) * * * 1/2 The voice of Sarah Vaughan was one of the incomparable wonders of this century's music world. She had it all. She was a pop singer, a jazz singer, a scat singer and, as was all too rarely revealed, a classical singer: She sang Handel's "Messiah" for the movie "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice." She wanted Leonard Bernstein to compose an opera for her, but was too shy to ask him.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic
Too often in recent years, one singer after another has been tossed prematurely into the record marketplace, touted as the next Sarah Vaughan or the upcoming Ella Fitzgerald. More often than not, these artists are too young and immature for prime time and the attendant hype. The case of Nnenna Freelon (despite the spelling, pronounced "Nee-na") is somewhat different. About 35, she has spent most of her adult life in North Carolina, raising a family and working locally.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Sarah Vaughan: The Divine One," to be seen this evening at 9 on KPBS Channel 15 and at 10 on KCET Channel 28, is part of the "American Masters" series and will unquestionably bring it added luster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Finding a follow-up to last year's stellar "McRae Sings Monk" collection was not easy, but this homage from one great singer to the memory of another strikes just the right note. Sarah Vaughan, a superb stylist with extraordinary vocal command, came to national attention with the big bands of Earl Hines and Billy Eckstine in the '40s. Vaughan, who died last year, went as a solo artist to even greater acclaim in jazz and enjoyed a few pop hits in the '50s, including "Broken-Hearted Melody."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1990
That there was more to Sarah Vaughan than met the ear is vividly recalled in these videos from her later years. Taped live at Storyville Jazz Hall in New Orleans, the 1986 "Sass & Brass" (60 minutes) recaptures her special rapport with the audience, along with the facial gestures--now coy and self-mocking, now commandingly intent. Among the opening songs with her regular trio, "Send in the Clowns" stands out as it did every time she reduced each audience to spellbound silence.
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