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Sarah Weddington

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NEWS
March 23, 1989 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Sarah Weddington, off on yet another speaking engagement, was being whisked along a New York highway by a hired driver when she paused to observe that, "Essentially, no one who's under 34 remembers Roe vs. Wade." But Weddington, 44, remembers the case with that special clarity reserved for the milestones of a lifetime. She then was a 27-year-old lawyer in Dallas, Tex., where, by and large, men were men and women were housewives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | STACY WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Weddington, the attorney who argued the Roe vs. Wade abortion rights case before the U.S. Supreme Court 20 years ago, says she can breathe a little easier now that a pro-choice Democrat is president. "What a difference a president makes," she said to an audience of about 600 who greeted her with a standing ovation Thursday at the annual Orange County Planned Parenthood luncheon at Le Meridien Hotel.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | DIANNE KLEIN, Dianne Klein's column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday
Sarah Weddington was in town the other day. She's been in a lot of towns lately, sometimes two in a single day. She's been traveling so much that she can recite the airlines' safety spiel verbatim, and she does that in her speeches, which are a hoot. (On Operation Rescue leader Randall Terry, whom she met moments before both appeared on a TV talk show: "They brought him into makeup because he had so many zits.") Sarah's in a better mood these days, happier, more rested, she says.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | HILARY HYLTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The lobby walls of the Driskill Hotel are hung with the portraits of figures of Texas political lore, men like Sam Houston and William B. Travis of Alamo fame. But on a rainy evening, a rather demure-looking woman in a conservative black suit and tidy tucked hairdo is the center of attention. First, Texas Democratic Party chairman Bob Slagle comes up to hug and say hello. They chat briefly about how well things are going in the presidential campaign.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | DIANNE KLEIN, Dianne Klein's column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday
Sarah Weddington was in town the other day. She's been in a lot of towns lately, sometimes two in a single day. She's been traveling so much that she can recite the airlines' safety spiel verbatim, and she does that in her speeches, which are a hoot. (On Operation Rescue leader Randall Terry, whom she met moments before both appeared on a TV talk show: "They brought him into makeup because he had so many zits.") Sarah's in a better mood these days, happier, more rested, she says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of archconservative Phyllis Schlafly, men are men and women are housewives--even if they work. In Sarah Weddington's world, men are men and women are whatever they want to be. Thursday night, Schlafly, 65, the matron saint of family-centered womanhood, and Weddington, 44, a Texas lawyer who won the landmark Roe vs. Wade case in 1973 that legalized abortion, debated inside the Bren Events Center at UC Irvine before an audience of about 800.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1993 | STACY WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Weddington, the attorney who argued the Roe vs. Wade abortion rights case before the U.S. Supreme Court 20 years ago, says she can breathe a little easier now that a pro-choice Democrat is president. "What a difference a president makes," she said to an audience of about 600 who greeted her with a standing ovation Thursday at the annual Orange County Planned Parenthood luncheon at Le Meridien Hotel.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | HILARY HYLTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The lobby walls of the Driskill Hotel are hung with the portraits of figures of Texas political lore, men like Sam Houston and William B. Travis of Alamo fame. But on a rainy evening, a rather demure-looking woman in a conservative black suit and tidy tucked hairdo is the center of attention. First, Texas Democratic Party chairman Bob Slagle comes up to hug and say hello. They chat briefly about how well things are going in the presidential campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of archconservative Phyllis Schlafly, men are men and women are housewives--even if they work. In Sarah Weddington's world, men are men and women are whatever they want to be. Thursday night, Schlafly, 65, the matron saint of family-centered womanhood, and Weddington, 44, a Texas lawyer who won the landmark Roe vs. Wade case in 1973 that legalized abortion, debated inside the Bren Events Center at UC Irvine before an audience of about 800.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Sarah Weddington, off on yet another speaking engagement, was being whisked along a New York highway by a hired driver when she paused to observe that, "Essentially, no one who's under 34 remembers Roe vs. Wade." But Weddington, 44, remembers the case with that special clarity reserved for the milestones of a lifetime. She then was a 27-year-old lawyer in Dallas, Tex., where, by and large, men were men and women were housewives.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | S. J. DIAMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roe vs. Wade is one of this year's loudest political rallying cries--immediately familiar, and immediately dividing the audience. Already, in either party or both, someone is probably saying, "Where is Jane Roe? What happened to her? Can we get her?" There are many such names, equally known if less divisive: Brown vs. Board of Education. Miranda vs. Arizona. Gideon vs. Wainwright. Regents of the University of California vs. Bakke.
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