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Sarajevo Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
September 13, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of this battered city's young and fashionable pressed outside the sandbagged doors of the new United Colors of Benetton clothing store Tuesday, and others inside pored over the orange, pink and green T-shirts stacked six deep and selling for two weeks' wages. It was the grand opening of a rather incongruous addition to Titova Avenue, Sarajevo's scarred downtown main street and site of last month's marketplace massacre.
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NEWS
April 14, 1997 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II, completing a promised healing mission delayed by Bosnia's war, squinted into a snowstorm Sunday and challenged the survivors of Sarajevo to turn their bomb-shattered city into a multiethnic model of tolerance and reconciliation. "The hope of all people of goodwill," he told 40,000 worshipers at an outdoor Roman Catholic Mass, "is that what Sarajevo symbolizes will remain confined to the 20th century, and that its tragedies will not be repeated in the millennium about to begin."
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NEWS
July 8, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a broadening of international condemnation of Serbian aggression in the war-torn Balkans, the seven leading industrial democracies called on the U.N. Security Council on Tuesday to consider using military force to make sure that food reaches the besieged people of Sarajevo. "The blockade of Sarajevo must be lifted and the shelling of the town stopped in order to sustain a comprehensive relief operation," the leaders of the so-called Group of Seven said in a joint declaration.
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
On Sunday's fifth anniversary of the start of the Bosnian war, descendants of the former Hapsburg rulers visited the site where their ancestor Archduke Francis Ferdinand was shot, triggering World War I. "This is the place where all tragedies began," Otto von Hapsburg said in the Bosnian capital, site of the June 1914 assassination by Gavrilo Princip, a Serb who opposed Austro-Hungarian rule of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
U.N. relief officials said Monday that they will try to airdrop food and medicine to thousands of Muslim refugees in Gorazde. The Bosnian government's last major southeastern stronghold, Gorazde has been under Serb siege for nearly 90 days. Efforts to reach the besieged city by land have failed. Sporadic dispatches by ham radio operators speak of heavy casualties and drastic shortages of food and medical supplies.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarajevo slipped back into its deadly rhythm of fierce nighttime shelling and uneasy calm by day, while tensions mounted in Belgrade on Saturday after a police threat to break up a weeklong demonstration against Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic. Artillery fire on the Bosnia-Herzegovina capital was described as the heaviest since U.N.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Fighting was reported in central Bosnia-Herzegovina on Saturday, hours after Sarajevo was hit with the heaviest bombardment since a truce took effect. Bosnian radio reported an infantry attack on Travnik, 45 miles northwest of Sarajevo, after a night of intense shelling forced residents into basements. Refugees of all ages have flooded into Travnik to escape fighting in northern and central Bosnia-Herzegovina as heavily armed Serbian forces, who already hold 70% of the territory, push for more.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Children in Sarajevo will start dying of starvation within a month unless there is a huge increase in the amount of food sent there, a top U.N. health expert said. Donald Acheson said the health of the entire population of the Bosnian capital, under siege for six months, might reach a critical state by mid-November. Acheson, special representative of the World Health Organization, appealed for governments to fulfill longstanding promises to send trucks, aircraft and peacekeepers.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sarajevo endured its worst pounding in weeks, with mortar rounds and artillery shells bombarding the Bosnian capital and fighting erupting on the city's outskirts. But in Washington, a U.S. official said that relief flights to Sarajevo--suspended after an Italian plane was shot down Sept. 3--should resume this week. The dangers of such an operation were emphasized by the fighting in Sarajevo, which left three dead and 24 wounded, and by an attack on two U.N. helicopters in Croatia.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sagging morale, indiscipline and drunkenness have seriously set back Serbian guerrilla attempts to divide Sarajevo and conquer most of Bosnia-Herzegovina, military experts have concluded. Coupled with the reopening of Sarajevo airport, which restores a lifeline to the city's 300,000 starving holdouts, the rampant unruliness in Serbian ranks could lead to their eventual defeat, according to those monitoring the bloody Bosnian war.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As residents of the front-line, Serb-held neighborhood of Grbavica, Albert and Antonija Alkalaj had more reason than most to be careful. He is a Jew and she a Croat. But it was not just a question of ethnicity in this battered section of Sarajevo from which thousands of non-Serbs were expelled at the start of the war. The Alkalajs are parents of a natural enemy of a Bosnian Serb state: the Muslim-led government's ambassador to the United States.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled and fractured for four years, this capital that came to symbolize the horrors of Bosnia's ethnic war was reunited Tuesday following the return to government control of its last and most agonized Serb-held district. Under terms of the U.S.-brokered Dayton, Ohio, peace agreement, 52 police from the Muslim-led government drove into the ruins of Grbavica at sunrise and raised the white and blue flag of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
March 18, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While elderly residents battled arson fires set by roaming gangs and NATO troops looked on, Bosnia's new reality was coming into focus Sunday: The ideal of ethnic reconciliation appears moribund, and the U.S.-brokered peace agreement that ended the Bosnian war may face a similar fate.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Muslims by the thousands returned Tuesday to the most populous Serb-held suburb of Sarajevo to revert to Muslim-Croat control, finding a district heavily damaged and largely emptied by the Serb exodus that has cemented the ethnic division of Bosnia. Tuesday's formal transfer of Ilidza to government control moved the Bosnian capital closer to becoming a reunified city and away from the goal of ethnic diversity enshrined in the U.S.-brokered peace agreement.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bosnian Serb stranglehold on Sarajevo, perhaps the most enduring symbol of the fratricide that laid waste to the Balkans over the past four years, officially came to an end Thursday when this Bosnian Serb-held suburb reverted to government authority. "I send this message with great pleasure to all citizens of Bosnia-Herzegovina and the whole world: The siege of Sarajevo has been lifted," declared Avdo Hebib, interior minister of the Muslim-led Bosnian government.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | Dean E. Murphy, Dean E. Murphy is a Times staff writer
Every day here in the Bosnian capital, people make simple testimonies to faith in the country's uncertain peace. They ride in trolley cars, even though some passengers were killed as recently as last month. They stroll along the city's main thoroughfares, even though sniper fire sometimes still rings out. They gawk at expensive display windows, even though most can barely afford basic groceries.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children line the once-treacherous Mt. Igman road that snakes into this capital. They wave and throw flowers at the British and French armored personnel carriers and the U.N. trucks that pass by in a mile-long convoy. One woman in a head scarf raises her palms upward in prayer and sobs her gratitude. Old men nod approval. This scene has the feel of a people welcoming an army that has come to liberate them, and there is an element of truth to that.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Fierce shelling killed 15 people in Sarajevo on Monday, including five members of one family slain near the presidency building and a girl killed as she and other children left kindergarten. The latest tragedies in the 20-month siege of Sarajevo came on a fair day that lured residents out during the first lull in fighting since pre-Christmas peace talks collapsed. By early afternoon, shelling and sniping broke out all over the city, sending people rushing for shelter.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene Wednesday on a snowy road leading out of this Sarajevo suburb presented a timeless snapshot of the Balkan war, a fleeting moment of suffering, helplessness and fear that has been played out countless times in this country. A dented, decades-old station wagon sat limp on the roadside, packed with old flour sacks containing the earthly possessions of the Molevic family. Nebojas Molevic and his father-in-law frantically fiddled beneath the hood, wet snowflakes clinging to their eyebrows.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of confused residents, some blinded by tears and others by anger, crowded the town hall here Tuesday in a desperate effort to find a way out of this Sarajevo suburb after Bosnian Serb authorities announced that everyone should leave by Friday.
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