Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSarajevo Film Festival
IN THE NEWS

Sarajevo Film Festival

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2009 | Associated Press
The 15th Sarajevo Film Festival kicked off Wednesday, bringing such celebrities as Gillian Anderson and Mickey Rourke to an event born in a sandbag-protected basement during the Bosnian war. The Balkan region's most important film event now draws more than 100,000 people each year, a long way from its humble beginnings in a city roamed by snipers and blasted by mortar shells. This year's festival includes 232 films from 53 countries to be screened over nine days. It opened with "Tales From the Golden Age," a film by five Romanian directors including Cristian Mungiu, whose abortion drama "4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days" won the Palme d'Or at Cannes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2009 | Associated Press
The 15th Sarajevo Film Festival kicked off Wednesday, bringing such celebrities as Gillian Anderson and Mickey Rourke to an event born in a sandbag-protected basement during the Bosnian war. The Balkan region's most important film event now draws more than 100,000 people each year, a long way from its humble beginnings in a city roamed by snipers and blasted by mortar shells. This year's festival includes 232 films from 53 countries to be screened over nine days. It opened with "Tales From the Golden Age," a film by five Romanian directors including Cristian Mungiu, whose abortion drama "4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days" won the Palme d'Or at Cannes.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
An international film festival went ahead as planned in Sarajevo on Saturday despite a Serbian artillery barrage that killed 10 people and wounded at least 55. Col. Bill Aikman, a spokesman for the U.N. Protection Force in Sarajevo, said the Serbs fired 830 artillery and tank rounds in a nine-hour bombardment that subsided just before nightfall. Most of the Serbian shells hit government-held Zuc hill overlooking the city from the north.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | Daria Sito-Sucic, Reuters
A huge silver plane circles over Sarajevo. Because it carries only happy people, it can never land in the Bosnian capital. The theme of "Summer in the Golden Valley" may be gloomy but the film by Sarajevo filmmaker Srdjan Vuletic and two other movies made over the last year by local directors fill Bosnians with pride. "Three feature movies in one year for a country of 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | STEVE KETTMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Danis Tanovic's "No Man's Land" created a stir this year at Cannes, where its playfully caustic sense of humor, moral authority and powerful antiwar message won a standing ovation--and a best screenplay award for Tanovic. But as important as the Cannes reception was to the film and its Sarajevo-reared writer-director, its opening of the seventh annual Sarajevo Film Festival last Friday night with a standing-room-only outdoor screening was in a way even more significant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
"Shell them till they're on the edge of madness." --Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic ordering the bombing of Sarajevo * "The poverty of life without dreams is too horrible to imagine: it is the kind of madness whichis the worst." --Poet Sylvia Plath, quoted in a press release from the Sarajevo Film Festival * Many things come to mind when this city's name is mentioned, but a film festival is not one of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1997
I was pleased to read Kenneth Turan's articles last week about the Sarajevo Film Festival. His description of the state of Balkan films was excellent, although I was surprised to note no reference to one of the pioneers of Yugoslavian film, Aleksandar Petrovic, one of the greatest directors in film history. Petrovic, who passed away three years ago, won a Palme d'Or at Cannes for "I Even Met Happy Gypsies" in 1967 (the first in Yugoslavian film history) and was nominated twice at the Academy Awards (for "Three" in 1966 and "Gypsies" in 1967)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Officially the country that still calls itself Yugoslavia is putting on a brave face. It took a booth in the international marketplace at the Cannes Film Festival and handed out a glossy booklet titled "Yugoslav Film: Culture of the Impossible." But to talk with directors from Belgrade is to hear the voice of depression and despair. They are shocked, of course, at the carnage that has swept their country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2001 | JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY
"Nessun Dorma," the glorious aria from Puccini's "Turandot," has been moving listeners since the opera's 1925 premiere, and whether your taste runs more regularly to Limp Bizkit or Stockhausen, it'll still get under your skin. It's what we casually call "evocative." But of what? Well, it could be any number of things. A first date, if you happen to take dates to the Met. Or Luciano Pavarotti's performance in Central Park in 1993. Or Aretha Franklin's at the Grammy Awards of 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
As the only Serbian director to attend the Sarajevo Film Festival, Srdjan Karanovic was understandably besieged by questions at his press conference. What was going on in Belgrade, who was working and what were they up to?
BOOKS
June 23, 2002 | TOM SHONE, Tom Shone is a film critic for the Daily Telegraph of London.
Every journalist knows the moment when it comes. The moment when opportunity beckons, when fate gathers in the wings, and life takes on that hard, gem-like flame of Manifest Destiny. For Michael Herr, it was in Vietnam. For Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, it was Watergate. For Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan, it was the 2000 ShoWest film festival in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2001 | JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY
"Nessun Dorma," the glorious aria from Puccini's "Turandot," has been moving listeners since the opera's 1925 premiere, and whether your taste runs more regularly to Limp Bizkit or Stockhausen, it'll still get under your skin. It's what we casually call "evocative." But of what? Well, it could be any number of things. A first date, if you happen to take dates to the Met. Or Luciano Pavarotti's performance in Central Park in 1993. Or Aretha Franklin's at the Grammy Awards of 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | STEVE KETTMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Danis Tanovic's "No Man's Land" created a stir this year at Cannes, where its playfully caustic sense of humor, moral authority and powerful antiwar message won a standing ovation--and a best screenplay award for Tanovic. But as important as the Cannes reception was to the film and its Sarajevo-reared writer-director, its opening of the seventh annual Sarajevo Film Festival last Friday night with a standing-room-only outdoor screening was in a way even more significant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1997
I was pleased to read Kenneth Turan's articles last week about the Sarajevo Film Festival. His description of the state of Balkan films was excellent, although I was surprised to note no reference to one of the pioneers of Yugoslavian film, Aleksandar Petrovic, one of the greatest directors in film history. Petrovic, who passed away three years ago, won a Palme d'Or at Cannes for "I Even Met Happy Gypsies" in 1967 (the first in Yugoslavian film history) and was nominated twice at the Academy Awards (for "Three" in 1966 and "Gypsies" in 1967)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
As the only Serbian director to attend the Sarajevo Film Festival, Srdjan Karanovic was understandably besieged by questions at his press conference. What was going on in Belgrade, who was working and what were they up to?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Officially the country that still calls itself Yugoslavia is putting on a brave face. It took a booth in the international marketplace at the Cannes Film Festival and handed out a glossy booklet titled "Yugoslav Film: Culture of the Impossible." But to talk with directors from Belgrade is to hear the voice of depression and despair. They are shocked, of course, at the carnage that has swept their country.
BOOKS
June 23, 2002 | TOM SHONE, Tom Shone is a film critic for the Daily Telegraph of London.
Every journalist knows the moment when it comes. The moment when opportunity beckons, when fate gathers in the wings, and life takes on that hard, gem-like flame of Manifest Destiny. For Michael Herr, it was in Vietnam. For Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, it was Watergate. For Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan, it was the 2000 ShoWest film festival in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | Daria Sito-Sucic, Reuters
A huge silver plane circles over Sarajevo. Because it carries only happy people, it can never land in the Bosnian capital. The theme of "Summer in the Golden Valley" may be gloomy but the film by Sarajevo filmmaker Srdjan Vuletic and two other movies made over the last year by local directors fill Bosnians with pride. "Three feature movies in one year for a country of 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1997 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
"Shell them till they're on the edge of madness." --Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic ordering the bombing of Sarajevo * "The poverty of life without dreams is too horrible to imagine: it is the kind of madness whichis the worst." --Poet Sylvia Plath, quoted in a press release from the Sarajevo Film Festival * Many things come to mind when this city's name is mentioned, but a film festival is not one of them.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
An international film festival went ahead as planned in Sarajevo on Saturday despite a Serbian artillery barrage that killed 10 people and wounded at least 55. Col. Bill Aikman, a spokesman for the U.N. Protection Force in Sarajevo, said the Serbs fired 830 artillery and tank rounds in a nine-hour bombardment that subsided just before nightfall. Most of the Serbian shells hit government-held Zuc hill overlooking the city from the north.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|