Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSarajevo Yugoslavia
IN THE NEWS

Sarajevo Yugoslavia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council unanimously agreed in principle Monday to send a battalion of U.N. soldiers to the airport of besieged and bloody Sarajevo in a risky attempt to ensure the delivery of relief supplies to the starving people of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III called Tuesday for Serbian-dominated Yugoslavia's expulsion from the United Nations and other international organizations to punish it for "outrageous, barbaric and inhuman" aggression in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Baker's demand was part of an evolving U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.N. soldiers and Bosnian postal employees ducked for cover under the windows of darkened upper-floor offices as the clatter of sniper fire burst from high-rise tenements opposite. Moments later, realizing that the shots were not directed at them, they smiled with relief and went back to watching the spectacular nighttime battle unfolding below. The bombardment, described by U.N.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a signal that the Bush Administration is inching toward possible military intervention in Yugoslavia, National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft said Monday that the conflict in the Balkans could soon become a threat to the security of the United States and its European allies. "It's already out of control. . . ," Scowcroft said of the war among the former Yugoslav republics.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Playing down speculation about the need for combat troops, the Bush Administration and the United Nations waited anxiously Tuesday for a cease-fire in besieged Sarajevo so that peacekeepers could start to take over the airport for badly needed relief flights to the starving in Bosnia-Herzegovina. In New York, the United Nations announced that Canadian Brig. Gen.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly frustrated by the world's inability to stop the carnage in Yugoslavia, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Saturday it would be possible to create an international air squadron to bomb the Serbian fighters besieging Sarajevo if peaceful methods don't work.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III called Tuesday for Serbian-dominated Yugoslavia's expulsion from the United Nations and other international organizations to punish it for "outrageous, barbaric and inhuman" aggression in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Baker's demand was part of an evolving U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Serbian-controlled Yugoslav federal army Saturday launched a massive attack on Sarajevo, capital of newly independent Bosnia-Herzegovina, and detained the republic's Muslim president in a move likely to enrage the embattled population. A European Community monitor from Belgium was killed elsewhere in the war-torn republic, prompting senior diplomats from the Western bloc to say they would have to reconsider their role in the intensifying Balkan conflict.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crowded around a park bench with other Bosnian refugees, Rabija Mirovic craned toward a scratchy radio Monday to catch word of how a cease-fire was faring in the Sarajevo neighborhood she fled less than a week ago. The stoic, 61-year-old pensioner showed no sign of disappointment at reports of shelling around her suburban apartment block. The worry lines etched in her face seemed only to harden at the news, as if confirmation of her worst fears were some sort of comfort.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian rebels pounded Sarajevo with artillery fire Saturday in one of the fiercest attacks of a two-month siege, dampening hopes that an agreement to reopen the city airport for relief flights will mean an end to starvation and bloodshed. U.N. officials announced Friday that they had secured an agreement with the warring factions for U.N. peacekeeping troops to take control of Sarajevo airport from Serbian guerrillas.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly frustrated by the world's inability to stop the carnage in Yugoslavia, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Saturday it would be possible to create an international air squadron to bomb the Serbian fighters besieging Sarajevo if peaceful methods don't work.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crowded around a park bench with other Bosnian refugees, Rabija Mirovic craned toward a scratchy radio Monday to catch word of how a cease-fire was faring in the Sarajevo neighborhood she fled less than a week ago. The stoic, 61-year-old pensioner showed no sign of disappointment at reports of shelling around her suburban apartment block. The worry lines etched in her face seemed only to harden at the news, as if confirmation of her worst fears were some sort of comfort.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Playing down speculation about the need for combat troops, the Bush Administration and the United Nations waited anxiously Tuesday for a cease-fire in besieged Sarajevo so that peacekeepers could start to take over the airport for badly needed relief flights to the starving in Bosnia-Herzegovina. In New York, the United Nations announced that Canadian Brig. Gen.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council unanimously agreed in principle Monday to send a battalion of U.N. soldiers to the airport of besieged and bloody Sarajevo in a risky attempt to ensure the delivery of relief supplies to the starving people of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian rebels pounded Sarajevo with artillery fire Saturday in one of the fiercest attacks of a two-month siege, dampening hopes that an agreement to reopen the city airport for relief flights will mean an end to starvation and bloodshed. U.N. officials announced Friday that they had secured an agreement with the warring factions for U.N. peacekeeping troops to take control of Sarajevo airport from Serbian guerrillas.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.N. soldiers and Bosnian postal employees ducked for cover under the windows of darkened upper-floor offices as the clatter of sniper fire burst from high-rise tenements opposite. Moments later, realizing that the shots were not directed at them, they smiled with relief and went back to watching the spectacular nighttime battle unfolding below. The bombardment, described by U.N.
NEWS
March 4, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a Serbian vigilante action failed to set Bosnia-Herzegovina's tense nationalities against each other, Serbian radicals called on Serbs on Tuesday to advance on the capital in a move that threatened civil war. But Serbian Democratic Party leader Radovan Karadzic said early today that he has appealed to his followers to remain in their own communities, a conciliatory gesture apparently prompted by warnings from the Yugoslav federal army.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Corpses bloodied the streets of Sarajevo on Friday after the fiercest Serb-led bombardment of Bosnia's capital in two months, news reports said. "It was a night of horror and destruction," the Belgrade-based Tanjug news agency said. In the neighboring state of Croatia, the historic Adriatic town of Dubrovnik came under artillery and mortar barrages from federal army batteries for the first time in six months.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. mediators escorted 800 Yugoslav federal troops out of besieged Sarajevo on Friday, resolving one side of an armed standoff that has prevented food and medicine from reaching the Bosnian capital for weeks. An indication that the second side of the standoff may be on the point of resolution came later Friday when a tentative agreement was signed to reopen the Sarajevo airport for relief supplies, the Associated Press reported.
SPORTS
June 1, 1992 | MIKE DOWNEY
I remember the red arches. The hamburger stand was serving something called a "Big Mek," which sure did sound familiar. And those arches out front sure did look familiar, golden or not. The meat inside the bun was a mystery, and the McDonald's people from America were not amused. I remember the plum brandy. At the hotel, beaming women in 19th-Century serving-girl garb came forth carrying beakers of slivovitz , a colorless liqueur that would have made wonderful fuel for somebody's car.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|