Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSarcasm
IN THE NEWS

Sarcasm

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 2003
I must wholeheartedly disagree with Dina Rose's comments about "Single in the City" ("Wknd Feedback," Jan. 23). I think the writers are representing both sides of the spectrum, and that there are absolutely no disparaging remarks or sarcasm. What have you been reading? Keep up the good work, everybody! Eric Calhoun View Park
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Sarcastic, sanctimonious, salacious, sly, slight and surprisingly sweet, the black comedy of "Bad Words," starring and directed by Jason Bateman, is high-minded, foul-mouthed good nonsense. I had wondered where Bateman's angry itch would take him next. The script, by Andrew Dodge, his first to be produced after many years in the studio trenches, is a good match of man and material. As an actor - whether a victim trying to even the score with Melissa McCarthy in "Identity Thief" or the ruthless top firing dog in "Up in the Air" - Bateman always brings an edge to his work.
Advertisement
SPORTS
November 2, 1985
I protest! Cancel my subscription! Two things I look forward to each year: Christmas and Jim Murray's saucy columns about the World Series cities. How did St. Louis and Kansas City escaped the buzz saw of Murray's sarcasm? C. PETER WAGNER Altadena
NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
"Homeless hot spots" began as a charitable experiment at the SXSW Interactive conference in Austin, Texas, but quickly morphed into a debate about the ethics of bridging the digital divide. It started with a blog post by the New York-based marketing company BBH Labs (short for Bartle Bogle Hegarty). "This year in Austin, as you wonder [sic] between locations murmuring to your coworker about how your connection sucks and you can't download/stream/tweet/instagram/check-in, you'll notice strategically positioned individuals wearing 'Homeless Hotspot' T-shirts," according to BBH. "These are homeless individuals in the Case Management program at Front Steps Shelter . They're carrying MiFi devices.
OPINION
August 21, 1988
Your editorial oozes sarcasm, but what was the point? Apparently, you would prefer that sex education teachers confine themselves to the "how-to" and the "how-not-to," and make no mention of any moral or ethical standards. You seem to have a real problem with principles. Why is that? GREGORY J. WAHL Santa Barbara
BOOKS
January 28, 1990
Richard Eder finds "depressing" and "complacent" (H. L.) Mencken's note to himself that "there is no other Jew in Baltimore who seems suitable" for the Maryland Club (Book Review, Jan. 14). As a curmudgeonly Jew, I see the remark as exquisite sarcasm. M. L. WHITMORE BRENTWOOD
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1994
In her review of an important new show by artist Karen Carson, Susan Kandel misreads irony and sarcasm in work that is baldly sincere, tremulously honest and blatantly spiritual ("Beautiful Photographs of a Beautiful World," June 23). When she claims that Carson's past work has relied on "marked sarcasm," Kandel shows that she has no understanding of the history of an artist whose work has always been daringly earnest and pointedly direct. Carson's stripped-to-the-bone graphic medium presents her simple message: "You are a soul."
SPORTS
December 21, 1991
KCBS not renewing Keith Olbermann's contract is a sad day for Los Angeles sports journalism. While other stations mainly show highlights, Keith's unique sportscasts will surely be missed. While they may find someone who looks nicer in a suit, they will not be able to replace his knowledge, wit, broad views, independence or sarcasm, all of which I have thoroughly enjoyed. BILL NOYES Diamond Bar
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990
Two Feb. 24 letters speak of "internationally known" and "world-class" (give me a break) female artists (e.g. O'Keeffe, Frankenthaler and Albuquerque) and denounce Times reviewer Christopher Knight with cries of "put-down," "superficial sarcasm" and "bilious disdain." Why is it so hard for these women letter writers to understand that mediocre work is lousy even if a woman does it? JOHN DEGATINA, Los Angeles
SPORTS
August 4, 1990
Nick Faldo is not running for mayor or in any popularity contest. He earns his living on the golf course, where his first responsibility is to play well. Ted Williams, Hank Aaron and Ben Hogan were not exactly warm personalities, but they set records and earned the full respect of all sports fans. Nick Faldo is one hell of a talented golfer and no amount of biting Jim Murray sarcasm is going to change the fact that this young Briton is a classy gentleman and credit to the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010
'Multiple Sarcasms' MPAA rating: R for sexual references and language Running time: 1 hour, 37 minutes Playing: In selected theaters
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Multiple Sarcasms" is Woody Allen lite — there's a lot of introspective fumbling around and intellectual foreplay. But in the end, instead of a satisfying climax, it feels like someone is faking it. Our central character is Gabriel ( Timothy Hutton), a NYC architect in the midst of a mid-life crisis of the mind. He's cheating on his clients by spending afternoons at the movies. He's lying to his wife Annie ( Dana Delany) and himself about his heart's true desire: to write a play about his unraveling life and his fractured relationships — so it's a comedy.
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | Chris Erskine
"You in town for the Olympics?" the waitress asks. "There's an Olympics here?" I answer. And with that, an evening begins at Yuk-Yuk's, Vancouver's premier comedy club -- an outpost for sarcasm, anarchy and subversive Olympic humor. Personally, I've never had much patience with funny people. But let's give these kids a chance. Onstage is Simon King, whose rat-a-tat-tat delivery is like that of a younger Robin Williams. He growls into the microphone, then punishes it with bleating llama sounds, then launches into a manic rant about the Winter Games.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2010 | By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19): You have the wisdom that experience can bring, but you're also willing to try new things and adopt a fresh mind-set. Taurus (April 20-May 20): Write down everything that's on your mind. Once you get it down on paper, you can organize your priorities. Gemini (May 21-June 21): An optimist can manage the unknown well, imagining it might be more wonderful than anything known. That's why you'll take a leap of faith today. Cancer (June 22-July 22)
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Nobody loves the Olympics like cartoonists. John Trever nailed the compulsories, mocking the meddlesome host government on the medal stand. Steve Kelley scored some belittling laughs wondering about the wunderkind. And Rob Rogers skillfully skewered the Soviets, er ... Russians, for back-stabbing a former satellite. Sarcasm, criticism and scorn -- that's the spirit, guys! Now, if you'll excuse me, I've got work to do: McCain is lip-syncing Dubya's war strategy, Obama just missed another slam-dunk and the housing market and consumer confidence are performing some spectacular synchronized plunging.
OPINION
December 24, 2006 | -- Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Ah, those holiday favorites! Wistfully bittersweet Charlie Brown ... jolly, rollicking Frosty ... luminously cheerful Rudolph ... and some seasonally sarcastic editorial cartoons! Leave the goodwill to others. We'll sink our claws into Santa, rap the current leadership and put anger in the manger scene. Hey, someone has to trumpet the crass commercialization and herald the high hypocrisy of the blessed holy days!
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Nobody loves the Olympics like cartoonists. John Trever nailed the compulsories, mocking the meddlesome host government on the medal stand. Steve Kelley scored some belittling laughs wondering about the wunderkind. And Rob Rogers skillfully skewered the Soviets, er ... Russians, for back-stabbing a former satellite. Sarcasm, criticism and scorn -- that's the spirit, guys! Now, if you'll excuse me, I've got work to do: McCain is lip-syncing Dubya's war strategy, Obama just missed another slam-dunk and the housing market and consumer confidence are performing some spectacular synchronized plunging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995
Re "Hey, I Said I Was Sorry," Commentary, July 20: After reading the article, I assumed I stumbled on the thesis of Ann Calhoun in her attempt to earn a Ph.D. in sarcasm. Reading it a second time, I now assume her purpose was to suggest that apologies being made by religious people, leaders and organizations are pointless if they are not the result of heartfelt changes in attitude and behavior. Who disagrees with her? If she's read "Healing America's Wounds" by John Dawson, she knows he doesn't.
SPORTS
November 18, 2006
Everybody is making such a big deal about Bob Knight hitting that poor kid during Texas Tech's game Monday night. Didn't John Wooden slap Lew Alcindor, Bill Walton and David Meyers while he was winning all those NCAA championships? This moron should not be coaching basketball, he should be locked up, and the key should be, well, like the chair at the Purdue game years ago, thrown away. MARC POPKIN Brentwood
OPINION
October 22, 2006
Re "Trying out Jesus," Opinion, Oct. 17 Joel Stein's column would qualify as hate speech if the subject were anything other than Christianity. Making light of one of the two mandated ordinances of the Christian religion does not show any sense of decency. Considering the furor over the cartoons of Muhammad published in Europe, I do not understand why Christianity is fair game for ridicule. RICHARD ROREX Apple Valley, Calif. Even though I'm an atheist, I find myself offended by Stein's glib, juvenile ridicule of a church service.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|