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Sarcopenia

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August 2, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Loss of muscle mass is a fact of life starting in middle age -- we lose about 1% a year in a phenomenon called sarcopenia. Researchers say they've not only discovered the cause of that loss but may have found a drug that could help it as well. The online study, released Tuesday in the journal Cell Metabolism , maintains that sarcopenia happens because of calcium seepage from the ryanodine receptor channel complex, a group of proteins found in muscle cells. A domino effect follows: The leaks kick off a chain reaction resulting in muscle fibers not being able to fully contract.
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NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Loss of muscle mass is a fact of life starting in middle age -- we lose about 1% a year in a phenomenon called sarcopenia. Researchers say they've not only discovered the cause of that loss but may have found a drug that could help it as well. The online study, released Tuesday in the journal Cell Metabolism , maintains that sarcopenia happens because of calcium seepage from the ryanodine receptor channel complex, a group of proteins found in muscle cells. A domino effect follows: The leaks kick off a chain reaction resulting in muscle fibers not being able to fully contract.
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NATIONAL
July 6, 2007 | Diane Lade, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Elayne Goldhair knows about osteoporosis, the age-related disease that causes loss of bone mass. She eats plenty of fruits and vegetables, and has a bone density test every other year. But like most people, the 86-year-old from Palm Beach, Fla., had never heard of sarcopenia, age-related loss of muscle mass. Sarcopenia is, along with osteoporosis and dementias like Alzheimer's disease, one of the most common reasons seniors end up in nursing homes, unable to care for themselves.
HEALTH
April 3, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Getting a good grip on your health may mean … getting a good grip. The force you can muster when squeezing an object or a weight doesn't only reveal how strong your hand and arm are. It can be a measure of overall muscle function and — according to one recent study — even portend how long you're likely to live. That's not as nutty as it seems, says Richard Bohannon, a professor of physical therapy at the University of Connecticut. "Grip strength reflects your overall muscle status and a general sense of how much muscle mass you have" he says.
HEALTH
March 1, 2004 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Like most older people, LaDonna Peterson hasn't heard of sarcopenia, an unhealthy loss of muscle mass that often develops with age. But by lifting weights a couple of days a week, the 70-year-old retired finance officer has managed to prevent it. While many of her contemporaries have trouble simply getting out of a chair because of muscle deterioration, Peterson enjoys doing tasks on her own -- from carrying her groceries to storing her baggage in the overhead compartment on an airplane.
NEWS
October 8, 2010
Want to live longer? One of the most sure-fire strategies is caloric restriction . Going on what amounts to a permanent diet has been shown to stave off age-related diseases and death in worms, flies, rodents and monkeys. But caloric restriction isn’t for everyone. Thankfully, scientists have been looking for ways to get the same benefits with less sacrifice. A group of Italian researchers is offering up one potential alternative – water fortified with a cocktail of branched-chain amino acids , or BCAAs for short.
HEALTH
February 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Strength training has strong-armed its way beyond the realm of bodybuilding. A growing body of research shows that working out with weights has health benefits beyond simply bulking up one's muscles and strengthening bones. Studies are finding that more lean muscle mass may allow kidney dialysis patients to live longer, give older people better cognitive function, reduce depression, boost good cholesterol, lessen the swelling and discomfort of lymphedema after breast cancer and help lower the risk of diabetes.
HEALTH
July 31, 2000 | CAROL KRUCOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Serious falls among older adults are often considered a consequence of failing eyesight and disability. But public health experts say such falls are frequently the result of a sedentary lifestyle that weakens the body and that exercise programs--such as dancing, tai chi and strength training--may be the best way to curb an alarming rise in serious falls.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Jeannine Stein
You may have heard the advice "If you exercise, you'll live longer." The good news -- or the bad news, if you hate doing anything more active than downloading iTunes -- is that it's true. Research backs this up. A 2007 study in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. found that fitter people lived longer, even if they had extra pounds around the middle.
HEALTH
March 12, 2007 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
WANT to walk? Don't, at present, do much of it? Here are some tips on how, when and where to put one foot in front of the other. * The basics: To reap walking's benefits, you don't have to redline your heart rate but you can't be a slugabed about it, either. The goal is to get your active metabolic rate between 3 and 6 times your resting rate.
HEALTH
March 12, 2007 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
REMEMBER fitness in the 1970s? All those aerobics classes, leotards and sweatbands, the endless jogging and velour track suits? Got to crank up that heart rate to 90% of maximum, experts told us. No pain, no gain. But today a new, easygoing message reigns: Leave the spandex at home -- you don't have to sweat or even change your clothes. Simply take a walk. Aim for least 30 minutes of activity on most days of the week, experts now advise.
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