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TRAVEL
March 11, 2007
This hippo pool lies 50 yards from a dining area at the Serengeti National Park river camp where Terry Powers and his fiancee, Jennifer Rusin, spent eight days last fall. Powers, of Irvine, said the big neighbors were not that neighborly. "You'd go to the water's edge and they'd grunt and jostle, as if saying, 'You think you're gonna come in here?' " He used a Nikon N65 for the shot.
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FOOD
February 22, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There is an ocean full of canned sardines at local markets, but which ones are really worth buying? Tasting through more than a dozen samples, the range of quality was astonishing. There were sardines that were as bland as beige, and then there were fish that were absolutely magnificent. To help make sense of the journey, I enlisted Lou Amdur, owner of Lou Provisions & Wine and a sardine lover from way back. We sampled sardines from a variety of sources: regular supermarkets, high-end markets, Asian markets and specialty markets such as the Harbor City Spanish store La Española Meats.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Warming ocean currents are bringing sardines back to Monterey Bay after decades of decline. Some scientists think global warming could be partly responsible for the burgeoning sardine population, although no one can say for sure whether warmer water is part of a natural cycle. "Global warming may make it so that we always have sardines in California," said oceanographer Jerrold Norton of the National Marine Fisheries Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The sardine fishing boat Eileen motored slowly through moonlit waters from San Pedro to Santa Catalina Island, its weary-eyed captain growing more desperate as the night wore on. After 12 hours and $1,000 worth of fuel, Corbin Hanson and his crew returned to port without a single fish. "Tonight's pretty reflective of how things have been going," Hanson said. "Not very well. " To blame is the biggest sardine crash in generations, which has made schools of the small, silvery fish a rarity on the West Coast.
FOOD
January 21, 2009
  After a recent trip to Las Vegas, there are two things deputy Food editor Betty Hallock still talks about: the white tigers at the Mirage and this beautifully layered sardine appetizer from L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon. "The fresh sardines were plump and juicy, and the concentrated tomato flavor of the concasse was rich and unctuous, offset by the vegetable crunch of slivers of cauliflower," she says. "I especially love the thin slice of butter on top -- amazing!" Sardines on toast Total time: About 1 hour Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
A day after waking up to find a silvery carpet of dead fish on the surface of King Harbor, Redondo Beach set about the enormous task of ridding the marina of an estimated 1 million sardine carcasses before they started to decay. City officials said Wednesday that it would take days and cost at least $100,000 to clean up King Harbor after the sudden fish die-off that began Monday evening. The city declared a local emergency in an effort to obtain state and county aid for the cleanup.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | NEJLA SAMMAKIA, Associated Press
History made Rosetta one of Egypt's best-known places, first as a major seaport for the Ottoman Empire, then as the city that gave its name to the Rosetta Stone, which yielded the key to ancient hieroglyphics. But the Rosetta of today hardly does justice to its rich past. Few pay any attention to its history and the sardines that once gave it wealth vanished 20 years ago--victims of the Aswan High Dam about 750 miles south. The town also languishes in worry about a destructive Mediterranean Sea, which took away its beach three years ago, swallowing up summer cabins and now threatening precious agricultural land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Nate Jackson and Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Redondo Beach awoke Tuesday to find a carpet of death laid atop the water, as if Davy Jones himself had burped up a couple hundred years worth of lunches. Thousands of silvery sardines floated atop the King Harbor marina fin-to-fin, with hundreds of thousands more, perhaps millions, piled on the coppery bottom, 18 inches deep in some spots. If this was a natural event, as officials say it was, Mother Nature did not show her best face. The Southern California coast, and Los Angeles County harbors in particular, have suffered from time to time from poor water quality and chemical intrusions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The catch of small, schooling fish such as sardines and anchovies should be cut in half globally and the amount left in the ocean doubled to protect the ecologically vital species from collapse, scientists say in a new report. The silvery species known as forage fish are harvested in huge numbers worldwide and are easy for fishermen to round up because they form dense schools, or "bait balls. " But wide fluctuations in their numbers make them especially vulnerable to overfishing, according to the report released Sunday by the Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force, a 13-member panel of scientists from around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Marine officials were trying to determine Tuesday what caused thousands of sardines to turn up dead in Ventura Harbor, the second mass fish die-off in local marinas in as many months. Roughly 6 tons of the small silvery fish were found floating in the harbor early Monday. Officials said their initial theory is that the sardines died after using up all the oxygen in a corner of the harbor. The scene in Ventura Harbor — crews churning up the water with aerators and volunteers scooping nets full of fish up from the surface — was reminiscent of the cleanup effort in Redondo Beach six weeks ago when officials discovered a thick blanket of dead sardines coating King Harbor . Scientists are looking into whether the two die-offs share a common cause.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Fish populations in Souther n California have dropped 78% over the last 40 years, according to a new study. Scientists consulted an unlikely source, sifting through records of fish caught up in the cooling systems of five coastal power plants from northern San Diego County to Ventura County. The analysis confirmed what fishing data and stock assessments had long indicated: That there has been a steep, ongoing drop in a wide variety of fish in the region over several decades.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Pelagic thresher sharks, charcoal-eyed predators that patrol the world's oceans, use their massive, scythe-like tails to slap schools of sardines, according to a new study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE . The aqua-smack delivers a shock wave so hard it forces dissolved gases to bubble out of the water, researchers found when they trained their video cameras on numerous feeding events near the Philippines. Scientists know that other marine predators, such as killer whales, tail-slap schools of small fish, called “bait balls,” when they hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
John Steinbeck couldn't find a boat and he needed one desperately. His marriage was in trouble. People in his hometown were vilifying him as a communist rabble-rouser. He figured a sea expedition with his wife, Carol, and marine biologist buddy Ed Ricketts would be just the thing. They chartered a 76-foot sardine boat called the Western Flyer. Over six weeks in 1940, they and a four-man crew chugged from Monterey to the Mexican coast, where they caroused in waterfront bars, poked through tide pools, identified dozens of new species of sea life and collaborated on "Sea of Cortez," a pioneering work of ecology still read by budding ocean researchers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The catch of small, schooling fish such as sardines and anchovies should be cut in half globally and the amount left in the ocean doubled to protect the ecologically vital species from collapse, scientists say in a new report. The silvery species known as forage fish are harvested in huge numbers worldwide and are easy for fishermen to round up because they form dense schools, or "bait balls. " But wide fluctuations in their numbers make them especially vulnerable to overfishing, according to the report released Sunday by the Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force, a 13-member panel of scientists from around the world.
TRAVEL
October 9, 2011 | By Susan Spano, Special to The Los Angeles Times
My father used to eat sardines, bones and all and packed in oil, out of a can, which appalled me as a little girl. When I was older, I saw perfectly civilized people eating whitebait, or English sardines, in pubs near the water, and consuming enticing plates of tiny fried fish prepared in excellent Italian kitchens around Rome. Still, I thought sardines lowly and avoided them until one sunny spring day in Douarnenez, France. Even without the sardine epiphany I will remember the breezy, colorful town because of its enchanting name, pronounced doo-are-nay-nay . It's on a steep little peninsula on the Atlantic coast of France, and it looks over the Douarnenez Bay and the islet of Tristan, a setting for the medieval romance "Tristan and Iseult," according to Breton legend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Marine officials were trying to determine Tuesday what caused thousands of sardines to turn up dead in Ventura Harbor, the second mass fish die-off in local marinas in as many months. Roughly 6 tons of the small silvery fish were found floating in the harbor early Monday. Officials said their initial theory is that the sardines died after using up all the oxygen in a corner of the harbor. The scene in Ventura Harbor — crews churning up the water with aerators and volunteers scooping nets full of fish up from the surface — was reminiscent of the cleanup effort in Redondo Beach six weeks ago when officials discovered a thick blanket of dead sardines coating King Harbor . Scientists are looking into whether the two die-offs share a common cause.
NEWS
October 5, 2003 | Amr Nabil, Associated Press Writer
Chanting to Allah, the fishermen of Qaitbey harbor slowly pull the long rope out of the water by hand, dragging in a net full of thousands of silvery sardines. It's the way fishermen here have worked for generations. Hauling in the net, suspended from a rope yards long, takes the two dozen men an hour. The work yields 45 pounds of sardines on a good day, and they will be able to sell the fish to housewives and others leaning over the quay wall for a total of about 100 Egyptian pounds, or $16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2011 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Even after they were scooped from waters off Redondo Beach, trucked across the city, hauled over the mountains and unloaded in the Mojave Desert 100 miles away, those dead sardines are still causing headaches. The Victorville organic composting company that accepted 175 tons of fish, which expired en masse in the King Harbor marina earlier this month, must now deal with concerns that a neurotoxin found in the sardines could contaminate their prized mulch. Dean Roberts, general manager of American Organics, said the powerful neurotoxin found in the sardines ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Sardines that suffocated and died en masse this week in King Harbor have tested positive for a powerful neurotoxin that scientists believe  may have distressed 1 million or more fish off the Los Angeles coastline and caused them to swim chaotically into the Redondo Beach marina. Researchers still believe critically low oxygen levels, not the toxin or an algae bloom, caused the fish to suddenly die Monday night in the Redondo Beach marina. But the discovery of domoic acid in dead fish ?
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