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November 13, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
A series of dreamlike rituals that abruptly turn violent, ugly, nightmarish: That's one take on Sardono W. Kusumo's "Passage Through the Gong," a striking if enigmatic example of contemporary Javanese Expressionism that opened a three-performance run at UCLA's Royce Hall on Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
A series of dreamlike rituals that abruptly turn violent, ugly, nightmarish: That's one take on Sardono W. Kusumo's "Passage Through the Gong," a striking if enigmatic example of contemporary Javanese Expressionism that opened a three-performance run at UCLA's Royce Hall on Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1993 | DAVID GERE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Making their grand entrance with melting simplicity, four women--two of them princesses from the Solonese court of Java--arch their toes upward as if stepping on sheets of glass. Crystal pitchers of red wine glow on a small wooden table. And in the background, a live chamber orchestra of knobbed gongs tinkles like a charmed music box. Serene, yes? But the tranquil atmosphere that perfumes Indonesian choreographer Sardono W.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1993 | DAVID GERE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Making their grand entrance with melting simplicity, four women--two of them princesses from the Solonese court of Java--arch their toes upward as if stepping on sheets of glass. Crystal pitchers of red wine glow on a small wooden table. And in the background, a live chamber orchestra of knobbed gongs tinkles like a charmed music box. Serene, yes? But the tranquil atmosphere that perfumes Indonesian choreographer Sardono W.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lighting designer Jennifer Tipton met Sardono W. Kusumo, an Indonesian dancer and choreographer, in 2008 at a workshop she was giving in Java. Tipton, one of this country's preeminent designers, had participants reverse their usual roles: Lighting designers made dance pieces; choreographers lighted them. Returning to Jakarta later that year, Tipton discovered a different kind of artistic shift. Sardono, known for his intense physical style, had begun painting. He was producing massive canvases, up to 30 feet high.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2010 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Making art isn't easy, and for many artists the hardest part is getting started. The first invention must be a strategy for facing a blank page, canvas, computer screen. Japanese composer Toru Takemitsu's ritual was to begin the day by playing a Bach prelude and fugue on the piano. Terry Riley likes to greet a favorite tree. Some turn to the bottle. The extraordinary Indonesian dancer, choreographer and visual artist Sardono W. Kusumo has come up with a far more fanciful ritual for making an action painting in his "Rain Coloring Forest," which opened the REDCAT season Thursday night.
WORLD
August 12, 2003 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Two skilled bomb makers who allegedly assembled the deadly Bali car bombs last year are likely suspects in the Marriott hotel blast in Jakarta last week that killed 11 people, police said Monday. Azahari bin Husin, a Malaysian university lecturer, and Dulmatin, an Indonesian electronics expert, have evaded a manhunt for the last nine months.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | Lewis Segal, Segal is The Times' dance writer
In a court yard studio, open on three sides and about the size of a small garage, Sujana Arja dances the final solo of a masked ritual that has made this city of 350,000 and its surrounding villages a magnet for ethnographers. Accompanied by a forceful percussion ensemble, Arja boldly strides across the red tile floor, his movements reflecting the same curt pride as his carved wooden visage. His whole body shakes with mocking laughter--but it is the musicians who supply the actual sound of it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1998 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance critic
In a world enriched by countless epic myths, "Ramayana" crosses the boundaries of time, distance, language and religion with amazing alacrity. In Hollywood parlance, it's got legs--seven-league legs, in fact. You can find this Asian equivalent of "The Iliad"--with its titanic battles, supernatural heroes and noble lovers--engraved in stone and painted in rich murals at the Royal Palace in Bangkok, Thailand. Puppet performances and native opera retell it in song throughout Indonesia.
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