Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSari Nusseibeh
IN THE NEWS

Sari Nusseibeh

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A pro-PLO Palestinian leader in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip said Saturday that U.S. targets in the region might be attacked as anti-American sentiment intensifies. "I'm thinking of people who will just want to express their anger, both against American symbols and American institutions," Palestinian intellectual Sari Nusseibeh said in an interview. He said he and others who have urged restraint are becoming increasingly isolated. Palestinians are angered by Washington's veto of a U.N.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
April 1, 2007 | Jeffrey Goldberg, Jeffrey Goldberg is the author of "Prisoners: A Muslim & a Jew Across the Middle East Divide" and is a staff writer at the New Yorker.
DURING the first Palestinian intifada, which began in 1987 and ended with the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993, the Israeli occupation authorities committed any number of deeply stupid acts. Perhaps the stupidest was the arrest by the Shabak, the internal security police, of a Palestinian man named Attalah Mahmud Najar, who was charged in early 1991 with the crime of "distributing inflammatory poems" in the Golan Heights. Najar was editor of a monthly magazine published in East Jerusalem.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Prominent Palestinians on Saturday condemned a senior Iranian official's call for the killing of five Westerners for every Palestinian slain in the uprising in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. Britain and France, meanwhile, joined the United States in condemning Iranian Parliament Speaker Hashemi Rafsanjani's call on Friday to kill American, British and French citizens, hijack planes and blow up factories in retaliation for the killing of Palestinians by the Israeli army.
NEWS
June 23, 2002 | DAOUD KUTTAB, Daoud Kuttab is a Palestinian journalist and the director of the Institute of Modern Media at Al Quds University in Ramallah.
It was no coincidence that the latest spate of attacks against Israelis occurred as President Bush was about to make his policy statement regarding the Middle East. Among other things, the statement was expected to include a road map to solving this century-old conflict on the basis of an independent Palestine alongside a safe Israel within secure borders. It was also no coincidence that the attacks by militant Islamic Palestinians occurred despite a plea by leading Palestinian intellectuals for an end to attacks against Israeli civilians.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli authorities Thursday closed the East Jerusalem information office of a prominent Palestinian, contending it has been used to help promote PLO objectives and disturbances during the 18-month-old uprising. Sari Nusseibeh, an Oxford-educated philosophy professor whose father was a former Jordanian defense minister, was also summoned to Jerusalem's police headquarters for questioning but has not been charged with a crime. He denied claims that his office engaged in subversive activities or associated with "any illegal organization."
NEWS
June 23, 2002 | DAOUD KUTTAB, Daoud Kuttab is a Palestinian journalist and the director of the Institute of Modern Media at Al Quds University in Ramallah.
It was no coincidence that the latest spate of attacks against Israelis occurred as President Bush was about to make his policy statement regarding the Middle East. Among other things, the statement was expected to include a road map to solving this century-old conflict on the basis of an independent Palestine alongside a safe Israel within secure borders. It was also no coincidence that the attacks by militant Islamic Palestinians occurred despite a plea by leading Palestinian intellectuals for an end to attacks against Israeli civilians.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Away from the angry confrontations with Israeli troops, far from the stalled peace talks in Washington, a Palestinian government-in-waiting is taking shape on the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip in anticipation of an end to Israeli occupation and eventual independence.
BOOKS
April 1, 2007 | Jeffrey Goldberg, Jeffrey Goldberg is the author of "Prisoners: A Muslim & a Jew Across the Middle East Divide" and is a staff writer at the New Yorker.
DURING the first Palestinian intifada, which began in 1987 and ended with the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993, the Israeli occupation authorities committed any number of deeply stupid acts. Perhaps the stupidest was the arrest by the Shabak, the internal security police, of a Palestinian man named Attalah Mahmud Najar, who was charged in early 1991 with the crime of "distributing inflammatory poems" in the Golan Heights. Najar was editor of a monthly magazine published in East Jerusalem.
OPINION
November 3, 1991 | Mark A. Heller and Sari Nusseibeh, Sari Nusseibeh, a philosophy lecturer, is a leader in the Palestinian nationalist movement. He composed his final corrections for the above passage from an Israeli prison, where he had been jailed for three months without charge. Mark A. Heller is the author of "Between Old Thinking and New," a study of changing Soviet policy in the Middle East
The barriers to a lasting peace in the Middle East can be overcome if a two-state settlement is pursued, contend the authors, an Israeli and a Palestinian. An excerpt. To judge by the historical record, the most ardent proponents of a negotiated peace between Israel and the Arabs are neither Israelis nor Arabs. Instead, would-be mediators--foreign governments, voluntary organizations, and well-meaning individuals--display the greatest impatience for a peace settle ment.
BOOKS
November 3, 1991 | Gloria Emerson, Emerson, who first traveled to the Middle East in 1957, is the author of "Gaza: A Year in the Intifada" (Atlantic Monthly Press)
Break the silence. This happens to be the name of a group of women artists from California who painted murals on the West Bank in honor of the Palestinian resistance to Israeli occupation. It might also describe a small but growing willingness among Americans to have the Palestinians treated not as demonic "terrorists" who see heroism in each defeat but as an abused and dispossessed people entitled to their own state. An unusual number of new books on the Palestinians and their uprising, or intifada , might be considered a measure of this new mood.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Away from the angry confrontations with Israeli troops, far from the stalled peace talks in Washington, a Palestinian government-in-waiting is taking shape on the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip in anticipation of an end to Israeli occupation and eventual independence.
OPINION
November 3, 1991 | Mark A. Heller and Sari Nusseibeh, Sari Nusseibeh, a philosophy lecturer, is a leader in the Palestinian nationalist movement. He composed his final corrections for the above passage from an Israeli prison, where he had been jailed for three months without charge. Mark A. Heller is the author of "Between Old Thinking and New," a study of changing Soviet policy in the Middle East
The barriers to a lasting peace in the Middle East can be overcome if a two-state settlement is pursued, contend the authors, an Israeli and a Palestinian. An excerpt. To judge by the historical record, the most ardent proponents of a negotiated peace between Israel and the Arabs are neither Israelis nor Arabs. Instead, would-be mediators--foreign governments, voluntary organizations, and well-meaning individuals--display the greatest impatience for a peace settle ment.
BOOKS
November 3, 1991 | Gloria Emerson, Emerson, who first traveled to the Middle East in 1957, is the author of "Gaza: A Year in the Intifada" (Atlantic Monthly Press)
Break the silence. This happens to be the name of a group of women artists from California who painted murals on the West Bank in honor of the Palestinian resistance to Israeli occupation. It might also describe a small but growing willingness among Americans to have the Palestinians treated not as demonic "terrorists" who see heroism in each defeat but as an abused and dispossessed people entitled to their own state. An unusual number of new books on the Palestinians and their uprising, or intifada , might be considered a measure of this new mood.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A pro-PLO Palestinian leader in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip said Saturday that U.S. targets in the region might be attacked as anti-American sentiment intensifies. "I'm thinking of people who will just want to express their anger, both against American symbols and American institutions," Palestinian intellectual Sari Nusseibeh said in an interview. He said he and others who have urged restraint are becoming increasingly isolated. Palestinians are angered by Washington's veto of a U.N.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli authorities Thursday closed the East Jerusalem information office of a prominent Palestinian, contending it has been used to help promote PLO objectives and disturbances during the 18-month-old uprising. Sari Nusseibeh, an Oxford-educated philosophy professor whose father was a former Jordanian defense minister, was also summoned to Jerusalem's police headquarters for questioning but has not been charged with a crime. He denied claims that his office engaged in subversive activities or associated with "any illegal organization."
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Prominent Palestinians on Saturday condemned a senior Iranian official's call for the killing of five Westerners for every Palestinian slain in the uprising in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. Britain and France, meanwhile, joined the United States in condemning Iranian Parliament Speaker Hashemi Rafsanjani's call on Friday to kill American, British and French citizens, hijack planes and blow up factories in retaliation for the killing of Palestinians by the Israeli army.
NEWS
February 2, 1991
Iranian officials were meeting with envoys from France, Algeria, Yemen and Iraq in TEHRAN. "A lot of countries want Iran to use its influence to end the war, and that's what we're trying to do," Deputy Foreign Minister Ali Mohammed Besharati said. An international PEACE group that included Americans arrived in Jordan from the Iraqi-Saudi border after its unsuccessful effort to prevent the war.
WORLD
July 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Israeli police reopened the university offices of the leading Palestinian official in Jerusalem on Monday, two weeks after they claimed that the premises were being used for Palestinian Authority activity and shut them down. Sari Nusseibeh, president of Al Quds University and the chief representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization in Jerusalem, said he signed a document Monday agreeing not to use the premises for political activity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|