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FOOD
October 13, 2011 | By Linda Burum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Truffles shaved onto wild-caught yellowtail sashimi or kanpachi nigiri splashed with black caviar might begin your omakase at Got Sushi? Or the chef might enrobe supple ribbons of pristine snapper in creamy cured uni brightened with the sharp citrus snap of yuzu and house-made soy sauce. Close your eyes and for a moment it's easy to forget that this tiny sushi bar is squeezed into a corner of King's Burgers, a fully operational burger joint in Northridge. With its vintage beige leatherette tuck 'n' roll booths and faux wood grain Formica tabletops, the classic setting is visually perfect for a place known for enormous breakfast burritos and fully loaded pastrami burgers.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
In the last two or three years, more and more Sushi Roku diners have asked for gluten-free food, so the restaurant company decided to develop a menu for people avoiding wheat, barley and rye. Customers at sushi restaurants have always had the option to eat sushi or sashimi, as long as they avoided soy sauce, which often contains wheat. But soy sauce isn't just in a bottle on tables; it's often an ingredient in other sauces. When a diner asks about gluten, it can take 10 or 15 minutes for a waiter to go through a menu and discuss alterations that would suit the diner, says Tom Cardenas, vice president of operations.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
In the last two or three years, more and more Sushi Roku diners have asked for gluten-free food, so the restaurant company decided to develop a menu for people avoiding wheat, barley and rye. Customers at sushi restaurants have always had the option to eat sushi or sashimi, as long as they avoided soy sauce, which often contains wheat. But soy sauce isn't just in a bottle on tables; it's often an ingredient in other sauces. When a diner asks about gluten, it can take 10 or 15 minutes for a waiter to go through a menu and discuss alterations that would suit the diner, says Tom Cardenas, vice president of operations.
FOOD
January 5, 2012
The wealth of Southern California's restaurant scene doesn't lie just in big-name, fine-dining places. There may be no other area in the country that can compare when it comes to the number and variety of treasures that offer really delicious food at often amazing prices. These are some of our favorite Finds of the year. There's Iranian, Mexican, Japanese, Chinese, Thai and even an experimental sushi fusion restaurant located in a hamburger stand. Now that's L.A. As al Bakery & Kabob Strangers chatting in line outside Asal Bakery & Kabob are all jonesing for a taste of the same thing: warm sangak , a floppy, chewy yard-long sesame-encrusted flatbread pulled from the fiery depths of a floor-to-ceiling oven whose constant muted roar dominates the Woodland Hills Persian cafe and bakery.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | David Lazarus
David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28. He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the seafood off the top and leaving the rice. Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill up on fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I knew dinner would be interesting when the waitress apologized that Hazuki had no English-language menu. It was Saturday evening, and I was the only customer in the cool, gray-and-black space until four Japanese businessmen entered and disappeared into a room lined with tatami mats. Hazuki is worlds away from the fast-food shops all around it in Little Tokyo Mall.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Tony Pierce, Los Angeles Times
NOTE: This is a blog about two guys attempting to lose weight over a six-week period.  They kicked off their weight-loss "strategies" on Jan. 10 . The lady who owns the place where I got the cookies for the Cookie Diet called to tell me I was doing it wrong. "If you really feel hungry," she said, "have another cookie. " I was not doing it that way. I was trying my best to muster through the irritation and ignoring the pangs until it was time for the next cookie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001 | MARTIN BOOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We serve only sushi!" This is likely to be repeated two or more times if you call for a reservation at Sushi Wasabe in Tustin. "Only sushi and hand rolls! No California rolls!" No kidding--you can't even get miso soup there. In other words, Sushi Wasabe, which opened 10 months ago in a strip mall at Newport Avenue and Walnut Street, is staunchly traditional. A hand-written sign next to the sushi bar informs you that the sushi is served Omakase style, which means "Trust me."
FOOD
April 7, 1999 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ono. Opah. Onaga. Opakapaka. Moi. Monchong. Hebi. If Mako Segawa-Gonzales has his way, these names will soon be as familiar to us as halibut and salmon. Mako, as he is known professionally, is conducting a campaign to introduce Southland diners to the pleasures of Hawaiian fish. Mako was born on the island of Hawaii to a Mexican American mother and a third-generation Hawaiian Japanese father. He went to high school in Tucson, Ariz.
FOOD
January 5, 2012
The wealth of Southern California's restaurant scene doesn't lie just in big-name, fine-dining places. There may be no other area in the country that can compare when it comes to the number and variety of treasures that offer really delicious food at often amazing prices. These are some of our favorite Finds of the year. There's Iranian, Mexican, Japanese, Chinese, Thai and even an experimental sushi fusion restaurant located in a hamburger stand. Now that's L.A. As al Bakery & Kabob Strangers chatting in line outside Asal Bakery & Kabob are all jonesing for a taste of the same thing: warm sangak , a floppy, chewy yard-long sesame-encrusted flatbread pulled from the fiery depths of a floor-to-ceiling oven whose constant muted roar dominates the Woodland Hills Persian cafe and bakery.
FOOD
October 13, 2011
King's Burgers/Got Sushi? LOCATION 9345 Reseda Blvd., Northridge, (818) 885-6456 PRICES Burgers, $5.59 to $7.99; specialty bowls, $7.50 to $8.99; sushi rolls and appetizers, $4.50 to $7.50; specialty rolls and sashimi plates, $7.50 to $15; omakase , $60 and up. DETAILS King's Burgers is open 7 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Got Sushi? is open 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for lunch and 5 to 10 p.m. for dinner.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | David Lazarus
David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28. He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the seafood off the top and leaving the rice. Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill up on fish.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Tony Pierce, Los Angeles Times
NOTE: This is a blog about two guys attempting to lose weight over a six-week period.  They kicked off their weight-loss "strategies" on Jan. 10 . The lady who owns the place where I got the cookies for the Cookie Diet called to tell me I was doing it wrong. "If you really feel hungry," she said, "have another cookie. " I was not doing it that way. I was trying my best to muster through the irritation and ignoring the pangs until it was time for the next cookie.
MAGAZINE
September 17, 2006
Saturday is Fish Amnesty Day, when you're supposed to give the angling a rest and the gilled creatures among us a brief reprieve. Of course, that makes it Worm Amnesty Day, too, but that's a whole different story. Since you won't be heading out to the pond, stream or mighty Pacific with a pole in hand, we suggest that you mark the holiday with a fine meal--all turf, no surf. Even Michael Cimarusti, the executive chef at the celebrated seafood restaurant Providence, approves.
FOOD
April 14, 2004 | Linda Burum, Special to The Times
In the vast fish markets of Korea's teeming ports and strung along the beach areas of its long coasts, there are countless raw fish houses (hwe jip), charcoal grill carts and impromptu stands specializing in boiled cockles, spicy crab soup or whatever the season brings ashore. Odaesan, a palatial new restaurant, brings the same bounty to Koreatown but in a far more luxurious setting than a hwe jip.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The minute I cross the threshold at I-naba, I'm overcome by deja vu. In a Torrance mini-mall, I feel as if I've walked into a restaurant in a small Japanese town. It's a stylish place of dainty flower arrangements, slanted mirrors and mustard-yellow tablecloths. Delicate bamboo shades shield the windows. All you hear is hushed conversation and faint music--at least when the sizzling deep fryer momentarily falls silent. This spare dining room is not the only place to eat here, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987 | MAX JACOBSON
Tokyo is sprinkled with "little" French restaurants, places the size of a rabbit hutch run by young, rebellious, Paris-trained Japanese chefs with a healthy disdain for the conventional workplace. In recent years, the phenomenon has spilled over the Pacific Rim into Los Angeles, bringing with it a unique style we like to call Franco-Japanese. Now, some say, the trend is waning. It's true that the almost-legendary La Petite Chaya, L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2001 | MARTIN BOOE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We serve only sushi!" This is likely to be repeated two or more times if you call for a reservation at Sushi Wasabe in Tustin. "Only sushi and hand rolls! No California rolls!" No kidding--you can't even get miso soup there. In other words, Sushi Wasabe, which opened 10 months ago in a strip mall at Newport Avenue and Walnut Street, is staunchly traditional. A hand-written sign next to the sushi bar informs you that the sushi is served Omakase style, which means "Trust me."
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