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Satanic Verses

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1989
Salman Rushdie will be seen reading excerpts from his controversial novel "Satanic Verses" on an installment of "Bookmark," the PBS series about books. The program is due to air locally at 9 a.m. Sunday on KCET Channel 28. At the time the reading was taped, "Bookmark" also was planning to feature Rushdie as a guest to talk about his work. That was before he was forced into hiding because of the Ayatollah Khomeini's death order, however. Now the book will be discussed without him.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
This is Salman Rushdie's season of peacemaking. No, the great Indian British novelist hasn't forgiven the Iranian authorities who leveled a "Rushdie must die" fatwa against him back in 1989 for the perceived blasphemies in his novel "The Satanic Verses. " Nor has he made peace, as far as we know, with his second wife, Marianne Wiggins, who is the subject of a most unflattering portrait in Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton. " But in that same book Rushdie did, in effect, apologize at length to his third wife, Elizabeth West, for the poor judgment he showed in leaving her for his fourth wife, Padma Lakshmi, the statuesque beauty he first met under the Statue of Liberty.
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NEWS
December 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Author Salman Rushdie has given up his campaign for a paperback version of "The Satanic Verses" and will authorize no further translations so long as there is any possibility of causing offense to Muslims. An Islamic leader in Britain who met with Rushdie said today the author hopes the statement will "make him a free man" after living in hiding for nearly two years under a death threat. In a statement released by Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
LONDON -- What's an icon of free expression to do when his moral character is trashed in print? Salman Rushdie forced his former bodyguard to apologize in court Tuesday over a tell-all book about guarding the author, who was threatened with death following the publication of "The Satanic Verses." Rushdie won without seeking damages or resorting to a messy, drawn-out libel trial, something his lawyers said could set a precedent for celebrities suing in Britain's plaintiff-friendly environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Parts of the controversial novel "The Satanic Verses" will be read, starting at noon, Sunday at the Blue Door Bookstore in Hillcrest. The independent Blue Door Bookstore, 3823 5th Ave., is sponsoring the reading to protest how chain bookstores have handled the book, Blue Door manager Robert Plumb said Wednesday. "There are a lot of issues here, First Amendment issues, censorship issues," Plumb said.
BOOKS
February 19, 1989 | SALMAN RUSHDIE, Salman Rushdie wrote the following in January after a public burning of copies of "The Satanic Verses" took place in Bradford, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom, which has a Muslim population of 50,000. The burning was carried out by a group of Muslims led by the city's senior imam, or religious leader
Muhammad ibn Abdallah, one of the great geniuses of world history, a successful businessman, victorious general, and sophisticated statesman as well as a prophet, insisted throughout his life on his simple humanity. There are no contemporary portraits of him because he feared that, if any were made, people would worship the portraits. He was only the messenger; it was the message that should be revered. As to the revelation itself, it caused Muhammad considerable anguish.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From Reuters
Israelis clamoring to buy the Hebrew translation of Salman Rushdie's novel "The Satanic Verses" snapped up all 4,000 copies of the first print run in three days, the publishers said Sunday. "(The Ayatollah Ruhollah) Khomeini did a good public relations job for us," said Rachel Marani, spokeswoman for Keter Publishing House. The late Iranian leader sparked a crisis in relations with the West in February when he called on Muslims to kill the British author for writing the book, which he denounced as blasphemous to Islam.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Islamic foreign ministers Thursday condemned "The Satanic Verses," urging that Salman Rushdie's novel be withdrawn, but refused to back Iran's decree that the British author be killed. Foreign ministers of the 46-member Organization of the Islamic Conference issued a separate declaration on the controversial book, which has sparked Muslim protests worldwide, at the end of a four-day meeting in the Saudi Arabian capital.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Salman Rushdie, born in India to a Muslim family, has ignited fires of protest among Muslims worldwide with his prize-winning novel, "The Satanic Verses," a story about the eternal conflict between good and evil. The novel takes its name from the verses the Prophet Mohammed removed from Islam's holy book, the Koran, on grounds they were inspired by Satan. Muslim critics--whom Rushdie has called fundamentalist extremists--say the book is blasphemous and have protested from London to New Delhi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, Times Staff Writer
The best-selling novel "The Satanic Verses," whose author has been the subject of a death threat from Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, was a hot commodity Tuesday in the San Fernando Valley. Of five bookstores surveyed, the book was sold out at three. And at the two others, it was selling briskly. The bookstores had received second printings of the book last week, after selling all of their copies of the first printing immediately after the death threat was publicized, store managers said.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago this month, Salman Rushdie received what he has called his "unfunny Valentine." On Feb. 14, 1989, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini condemned "The Satanic Verses" as blasphemy, and called for Rushdie's death. The author, who lives in London, was forced into hiding. The novel's Japanese translator was murdered, and the Italian and Norwegian translators were attacked. A decade later, the 51-year-old Rushdie is, in many ways, a fortunate man.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in nearly a decade, author Salman Rushdie opened his famously hooded eyes Friday morning without an official Iranian death threat hanging like a macabre canopy over his head. And what was the first thought that popped into his literary mind at the dawn of his freedom? On the day of his dreams? "I thought, 'God, it's only half past five,' " Rushdie said with a playful laugh.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has been on the run for six years, hiding under armed guard in a network of safe houses. Now, with old passions fading and a new book to sell, British author Salman Rushdie is ending the seclusion imposed by a zealot's death sentence. As a survivor, he is sadly wiser in the ways of the world, Rushdie says, but no less disposed to speak his mind.
NEWS
March 21, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salman Rushdie--the author whom Iran six years ago marked for death for his book "The Satanic Verses"--met France's highest politicians on Monday, winning assurances that they are willing to lead a European effort to persuade Tehran to declare a "cease-fire" on him. "I think we are at the beginning of a very serious step," Rushdie said after meeting with Prime Minister Edouard Balladur, Foreign Minister Alain Juppe and other top French officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993
Few novels may be said to have made history. Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was one. Salman Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses" is another. A novel in which a main character dreams himself into the mind of Mohammed (the title alludes to the scandalous but historical deletion of a few verses from the Koran), "The Satanic Verses" became an international scandal in the Muslim world and prompted a still-unlifted death sentence against the author by the Iranian government.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An angry Muslim mob burned down a hotel in eastern Turkey on Friday, killing 35 people and forcing the target of its protest, the Turkish translator of Salman Rushdie's novel "The Satanic Verses," to flee by a fire department ladder. Aziz Nesin, 78, was in the conservative eastern city of Sivas with other intellectuals for a symposium to commemorate the hanging of a 16th-Century Ottoman poet who wrote against repression.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Angered by the response of major bookstores to the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's call for the murder of author Salman Rushdie, hundreds of Hollywood writers are contributing to the costs of a full-page ad in a national newspaper. The advertisement--expected to appear in the Wall Street Journal next week--will voice the writers' objections to the Ayatollah's action, as well as a decision by two major bookstore chains to drop Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses."
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | MARCUS ELIASON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After chants of " Allahu Akbar !" echoed in the cavernous Royal Albert Hall, the audience was told that passages from "The Satanic Verses" would be read aloud and that those who couldn't take it had two minutes to leave. No one stirred. Then a tall man with a white beard and skullcap took the podium and fired the latest salvo in the yearlong Islamic campaign against the novel and its Indian-born Muslim author, Salman Rushdie.
BOOKS
November 29, 1992
Having not read Gore Vidal's "Live From Golgotha," I can pass no judgment on Uri Dowbenko's statement (Letters, Oct. 18) that Vidal merits being exiled into "the darkness of a well-deserved obscurity with Salman Rushdie and other literary pretenders of the 20th Century." However, I can tell you this: Salman Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses" is one of the most joyous, memorable, astounding, and beautiful novels I have ever read. And it is in the text of this masterpiece that Rushdie prophetically (and sadly)
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration on Wednesday rejected suggestions that it should meet with author Salman Rushdie and portrayed his visit to Washington this week as an effort at book promotion rather than as a campaign for freedom of expression. "There's no reason for any special relationship with Rushdie," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater told reporters. "I mean, he's an author. He's here. He's doing interviews and book tours and things authors do.
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