Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSatanic Verses Book
IN THE NEWS

Satanic Verses Book

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
The government of Turkey on Friday banned Salman Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses," a book denounced by Muslims as blasphemous. It gave no reason why the ban came months after controversy erupted elsewhere over the book.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in nearly a decade, author Salman Rushdie opened his famously hooded eyes Friday morning without an official Iranian death threat hanging like a macabre canopy over his head. And what was the first thought that popped into his literary mind at the dawn of his freedom? On the day of his dreams? "I thought, 'God, it's only half past five,' " Rushdie said with a playful laugh.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE and DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writers
As anger over an allegedly blasphemous novel continued to gather force in the Islamic world, Iran's spiritual leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, said Tuesday that the author and publishers of the book should be killed.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | From Reuters
Iran's spiritual leader, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on Sunday renewed a death edict announced four years ago against British author Salman Rushdie for affronting Muslim sensitivities. Rushdie, appearing in England, described the sentence as a "straightforward terrorist threat." A Muslim foundation that offered more than $3 million for Rushdie's head said Sunday that the time is ripe for carrying out the death sentence originally pronounced by the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Iran on Tuesday severed diplomatic relations with Britain, accusing its government of anti-Islamic "treachery" for refusing to denounce Salman Rushdie's novel "The Satanic Verses." Iran's Parliament had given Britain one week to lift a diplomatic embargo and "clarify" its stance on the book, which many Muslims consider blasphemous. Tuesday was the deadline. London blamed Tehran for the break. It came after Britain withdrew all its diplomats from Tehran to protest a Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Film director Martin Scorsese, who came under attack in the United States and abroad for his depiction of a vulnerable and sometimes confused Jesus in the film "The Last Temptation of Christ," said Monday that his Academy Award nomination for best director serves as a signal of support for other artists' controversial works.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writers
Pre-dawn firebombs hurled through windows Tuesday damaged two Berkeley book stores, one a literary and political landmark whose owner had vowed publicly to resist Islamic pressure to stop selling "The Satanic Verses," as violence apparently broke out around the Salman Rushdie novel.
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Iran's government "can expect to be held accountable" if Americans or American companies are hurt by the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's campaign against British author Salman Rushdie, President Bush said Tuesday. "Inciting murder and offering rewards for its perpetration are deeply offensive to the norms of civilized behavior," Bush told reporters at a White House press conference.
NEWS
September 15, 1989
A small bomb shattered the window of a York, England, bookstore owned by the publisher of Salman Rushdie's controversial novel "The Satanic Verses," and bombs were found at three of the publisher's stores in other towns, police said. The bomb at the Viking Penguin bookstore in the northern city of York caused no injuries and only slight damage. Police said that bombs at Peterborough, in central England, and Guildford, in the south, were defused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS and KENNETH T. YAMADA, Times Staff Writers
Steve Mellow knew he was taking a bit of a risk when he decided to include a brief tribute to author Salman Rushdie in a theatrical reading this Friday at a Costa Mesa bookstore. But Mellow said he never imagined that he would be fired by the bookstore chain. An official with Rizzoli Book Store in New York, which also owns Scribner stores, confirmed that it canceled its contract Wednesday with Mellow for his regular reading sessions at Scribner in the Crystal Court shopping mall in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese scholar who translated Salman Rushdie's controversial novel "The Satanic Verses" was found stabbed to death Friday morning. The body of Hitoshi Igarashi, 44, an assistant professor of comparative Islamic culture at Tsukuba University, northeast of Tokyo, was discovered by a cleaning lady in the hallway of a campus building. Igarashi's body bore a deep knife wound in the neck and cuts on the hands and face, police said, adding that he was killed Thursday night or early Friday.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | From United Press International
On the second anniversary of a death sentence issued against Salman Rushdie for alleged blasphemy against Islam, friends of the writer urged world leaders Thursday to repudiate the renewal of the edict by Iranian ministers. The International Committee for the Defense of Salman Rushdie and His Publishers condemned what it said was public acquiescence on the plight of Rushdie.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | from United Press International
Iran's spiritual leader, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, ruled Wednesday that the death sentence issued last year against British author Salman Rushdie remains in force, Tehran Radio reported. Khamenei issued a statement two days after Rushdie renounced his novel "The Satanic Verses." The statement described Rushdie as an apostate--an apparent rejection of the author's announcement that he had embraced Islam.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signs emerged Tuesday that author Salman Rushdie did not placate all his opponents by disavowing portions of his controversial novel, "The Satanic Verses," as one Iranian newspaper declared the death sentence against him irrevocable, and some Muslim leaders said they will not be satisfied until he repudiates the entire book.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
British author Salman Rushdie embraced Islam on Monday, disavowed parts of his novel "The Satanic Verses" that many Muslims have branded as heresy--and said that he feels much safer now from Iranian death threats. The 43-year-old Rushdie, who was born in India of Muslim parents, has been in hiding under police guard for 22 months since Iran's late leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, angrily accused him of blasphemy against Islam and offered $1 million to anyone who would kill him.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain and Iran announced Thursday that they have resumed diplomatic relations, which were severed by Iran in March, 1989, in a dispute over a controversial novel. The announcement was made by Douglas Hurd, the British foreign secretary, and Ali Akbar Velayati, Iran's foreign minister. Both are in New York for the opening of the U.N. General Assembly.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
European Economic Community foreign ministers decided Monday that member nations may send their ambassadors back to Iran, but a ban on high-level visits will continue, Britain's foreign secretary said. The 12 Common Market nations recalled their envoys Feb. 20 in response to the order by Iran's leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, that author Salman Rushdie be killed.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
An obscure Muslim fundamentalist group, the Soldiers of Justice, claimed responsibility in Beirut on Friday for the slayings of a Muslim religious leader and his assistant earlier this week. The Lebanese-based group said Muslim leader Abdullah Ahdal, 36, and assistant Salim Behir, 40, were killed because they worked for Israeli intelligence.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still in hiding following death threats from the spiritual leader of Iran, Salman Rushdie has written two new books of a decidedly nonpolitical nature. "Haroun and the Sea of Stories," a novel Rushdie wrote for his son, and "Imaginary Homelands," a collection of essays written between 1981 and 1990, will be published under a joint arrangement of Granta Books of Great Britain and Penguin USA in this country.
MAGAZINE
July 22, 1990 | MARIANNE WIGGINS
In February, 1989, Marianne Wiggins became, to use a phrase Moscow once favored for those it banished to Siberia, an internal exile--from literary London to pastoral Wales. The American-born author of two warmly reviewed books of fiction had just published her most ambitious effort yet, the novel "John Dollar." But Wiggins was married to the Indian-born novelist Salman Rushdie, whose new novel, "The Satanic Verses," had brought an Iranian death sentence down on his head.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|