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WORLD
January 30, 2013 | By Jung-yoon Choi and Barbara Demick
SEOUL -- In danger of falling behind in the space race on the Korean peninsula, the South Korean government announced Wednesday that it had successfully launched a rocket into space. Pressure had been mounting ever since mid-December when communist arch-rival North Korea managed to launch a multi-stage rocket and put a satellite into orbit. South Korea's Satellite Launch Vehicle-1, also known as Naro, blasted off at 4 p.m. local time from a space center in Jeolla province on the southwestern coast.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Larry saw my recent video about T-Mobile offering hundreds of dollars to get people to sign up for wireless service. He wants to know if any cable or satellite companies have similar offers. I can understand his interest. Cable and satellite packages can set you back plenty -- especially because you're required to buy dozens if not hundreds of channels you may never watch. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions The good news: Yes, these companies have some special offers on tap. The bad news: They may not be offering what Larry's looking for. Check out today's Ask Laz video for some tips on how to get the best deal for cable or satellite service.
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SCIENCE
April 13, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Using space technology to sniff out a telltale trail of penguin poop strewn about the edges of Antarctica, scientists have completed the first-ever census of an animal population taken with satellite imagery. The collaboration of British and American researchers was able to identify 44 emperor penguin colonies, including seven that were previously unknown. They counted 595,000 birds - twice as many as they expected to see. "Now that we have this baseline information, we can start asking new questions" about the Antarctic ecosystem, said Michelle LaRue, a doctoral student in conservation biology at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and coauthor of a paper about the discovery, published Friday in the journal PLoS One. As depicted in the 2005 film "March of the Penguins," emperor penguin pairs battle temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit to nest at their breeding sites each year.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
A high-stakes battle is underway in Washington over launching the U.S. government's most sophisticated national security satellites. Space entrepreneur Elon Musk is pitted against the nation's two largest weapons makers, Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp., in a fight for military contracts worth as much as $70 billion through 2030. For eight years, the Pentagon has paid Boeing and Lockheed - operating jointly as United Launch Alliance - to launch the government's pricey spy satellites without seeking competitive bids.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - In a new development in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, a Chinese satellite has spotted a large object floating in the southern Indian Ocean, Malaysia's defense minister said Saturday. The minister, Hishammuddin Hussein, reading from a piece of paper handed to him during a regular press briefing, said that the debris in the satellite imagery measured 74 feet by 43 feet. He said the Chinese would be sending ships to that area to verify.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE -- A 19-story white rocket successfully lifted a NASA science satellite into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base, located northwest of Santa Barbara. The picture-perfect launch, which took place Monday at 10:02 a.m. PST, occurred at the base's Space Launch Complex-3 along the Pacific Ocean. The Atlas V rocket, built by United Launch Alliance, boosted the Landsat 8 satellite about 410 miles above the Earth. The satellite's first signal was received 82 minutes into the mission at a ground station in Svalbard, Norway, the space agency said.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Outer space is about to get its first janitor satellite. Engineers from the Swiss Space Center at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne announced this week that they soon will begin work on CleanSpace One, a prototype for a line of brand-new satellites whose sole mission will be to remove defunct satellites from orbit. If the prototype is successful, the EPFL hopes to create a family of "de-orbiting" satellites so that humanity can practice in space what the Boy Scouts preach here on Earth - take only pictures (or data readings)
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt
Lots of attention is being focused on Silver Lake now that Forbes has named it "America's Hippest Hipster Neighborhood. " In a stunning feat of skinny-jean-clad domination, it beat out such messy-haired hubs as San Francisco's Mission District and Brooklyn's Williamsburg for the dubious title. Whether the moniker makes you want to laugh or cry, it's here to stay. As a former longtime Silver Lake-ian, the announcement made me want to drink, which is why I'm pleased to announce that the revered Silver Lake indie rock club, the Satellite (formerly Spaceland)
BUSINESS
December 9, 2010 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Tired of the rising frequency of public disputes between programming networks and local cable operators and satellite broadcasters that leave consumers in the lurch, the FCC said it would propose new rules that would give it more clout to play referee. Over the last year, there have been several high-profile spats between big media companies over fees charged for programming. In one notable instance, News Corp.'s Fox pulled the signal of its New York City TV station from Cablevision Systems Corp.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Barely visible in the dense fog at Vandenberg Air Force Base, a 19-story rocket roared to life and boosted a top-secret satellite into orbit. Little is known about the spacecraft except that it belongs to the National Reconnaissance Office. The secretive federal agency is in charge of designing, building, launching and maintaining the nation's spy satellites. At 2:39 p.m. PDT, Thursday, the satellite was lifted into space atop United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket. The mission had been delayed six weeks because of a nagging glitch with equipment on the base northwest of Santa Barbara.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
An 18-story rocket carrying a $518-million military weather satellite was launched into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base on Thursday, extending the life of a program that began in the early 1960s. The 7:46 a.m. PDT blastoff was the first of the year for the team at Vandenberg's 30th Space Wing. "I couldn't be more proud of this team of professionals," said Col. Keith Balts, wing commander. "The team ... worked diligently to ensure that this launch was safe and successful.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
For more than 15 years, a $518-million military weather satellite sat in a clean room at Lockheed Martin Corp.'s facility in Sunnyvale waiting for the day it would be launched into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base. On Thursday morning, the spacecraft is finally set to be blasted into space atop Atlas V rocket. It will be the latest satellite launched in support of the military's long-running Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, a satellite system initiated in 1962.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- More tantalizing clues emerged Thursday about the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 as fresh satellites photos showed a debris field in the South Indian Ocean off Australia, but the retrieval was frustrated by poor weather. Thailand announced that it had spotted 300 floating objects on an earth observation satellite photograph taken Monday, although Anond Snidvongs, director of the Geo-Informatics Space Technology Development Agency, cautioned: "We cannot -- dare not -- confirm they are debris from the plane.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday announced the Facebook Connectivity Lab, a division within his company that is working with drones, satellites and lasers to bring Internet connectivity to those who don't yet have it. The effort is a part of Internet.org, a global partnership that was launched last year with the mission of connecting everyone on the planet to the Internet. "Our goal with Internet.org is to make affordable access to basic Internet services available to every person in the world," Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post . VIDEO: Unboxing the HTC One (M8)
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Barbara Demick and W.J. Hennigan
BEIJING - Malaysian authorities said Wednesday that they were encouraged by new images from European satellites showing 122 floating objects off the Australian coast that could be debris from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. The discovery bolstered hope of finding wreckage from the Boeing 777, believed to have crashed March 8 in the choppy seas 1,500 miles southwest of Perth. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said Thursday morning that 11 aircraft and five ships from the U.S., Australia, China and Japan had resumed the search, which will cover 30,000 square miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
A satellite network launched by a group of studios and theater chains last year just got bigger. The Digital Cinema Distribution Coalition (DCDC) said it has signed a letter of intent to acquire the Deluxe/EchoStar satellite network, adding nearly 1,000 theater sites, the companies said. No financial details were disclosed. With the acquisition, the coalition will double the size of its satellite network, which is expected to significantly reduce the cost of delivering movies to theaters and enable it to beam live concerts, operas and sporting events into multiplex venues nationwide.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2012 | By Amina Khan
Is North Korea's satellite dead in orbit? Launched last week, the spacecraft seems to be tumbling overhead, according to astronomers keeping track of the device. “At this stage I'm getting a bit skeptical,” Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said in an interview.  “I would start to be mildly surprised if the satellite is really working.” Retired astronomer Greg Roberts in Cape Town, South Africa, measured the light coming from the satellite orbiting roughly 300 miles above the Earth's surface and found that it seems to grow bright and dim by turns, indicating that it's spinning as it flies through space, McDowell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012 | By August Brown
The Henry Clay People performed on New Year's Eve at the Satellite last year, and by all accounts it was a Champagne-saturated bacchanal of indie rockers letting their hair down. They'll reprise it this year with a set to wrap up their December residency, which is celebrating their 10th anniversary as a band. Torches, Kissing Cousins and the Lonely Wild join them, and if your heart still lies with fuzz-blasted rock tunes and stage-diving frontmen, this is where you want to watch the ball drop (or ignore the ball-drop to spray someone with PBR)
WORLD
March 24, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
The British company whose satellite data helped direct search efforts for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 toward the south Indian Ocean said about two weeks ago that it had received “routine” and “automated” signals from the missing Boeing 777. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, who announced Monday that the plane carrying 239 people "ended in the southern Indian Ocean" with no hope of survivors, said the company, Inmarsat, has been performing...
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Tim Warner, chief executive of Cinemark Holdings Inc., admits he'd never heard of the popular science fiction series "Doctor Who. " So the Montana native was skeptical when executives at BBC Wordwide approached him about the idea of screening a simulcast of the 50th anniversary episode of the cult-classic British TV series in Cinemark theaters across Latin America and the U.S. In late November, hundreds of "Whovians" showed up at more than...
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