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NEWS
January 12, 1991
John Bystrom, 69, who established a pan-Pacific Ocean satellite communications project designed to lessen the isolation of remote islands. In 1971 Bystrom established the University of Hawaii's PEACESAT program, which linked 14 Pacific areas via a low-technology communications system. PEACESAT, which stands for Pan-Pacific Education and Communications Experiments by Satellite, made Hawaii the first state to offer university courses and handle inter-library communications by satellite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Robert N. Wold, an innovator in the use of satellite technology for the distribution of television programming, died Saturday in Irvine of complications from dementia, his family said. He was 87. Born in Minneapolis on Sept. 11, 1925, Wold served in the Navy during World War II and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1950. He started his career in advertising, first at CBS and later with the agencies Campbell Mithun and NW Ayer. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 In 1971, Wold left advertising to consult with sports rights holders on distribution to television and radio.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comsat Corp. may have made its reputation in outer space, but it is placing a good part of its future on the ice. A longtime provider of global communications services via satellites, Comsat this week agreed to buy the National Hockey League's Quebec Nordiques for $75 million. If merging sports with satellites sounds odd, well, Comsat already is a hybrid of technology and entertainment holdings that is part Ted Turner and part Madison Square Garden.
OPINION
December 16, 2012
The International Telecommunication Union, the little-known but influential United Nations agency that oversees phone, radio and satellite communications, last week stopped short of fragmenting the Internet into national fiefdoms, as some had feared it would do through a new global treaty. Instead, the draft that delegates approved barely mentions the Internet. The result wasn't exactly a victory for those who are committed to a free and open Internet, however. Although delegates rejected many of the worst proposals, they laid the groundwork for having governments, not Internet stakeholders, regulate the technical aspects of the Web. The agency's effort to update a 24-year-old global telecommunications treaty exposed a sharp rift between the developed countries that were the earliest adopters of the Internet and the developing world, particularly Russia, China and other authoritarian regimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Marvin Chodorow, a former Stanford University physics professor who helped develop the klystron tube essential to radar and satellite communications systems, has died. He was 92. Chodorow died Oct. 17 of natural causes at his home on the Palo Alto campus, university officials announced. "Marvin was the leading figure in transmitting the lore of klystrons from industry to the Stanford community," Wolfgang K.H.
OPINION
December 16, 2012
The International Telecommunication Union, the little-known but influential United Nations agency that oversees phone, radio and satellite communications, last week stopped short of fragmenting the Internet into national fiefdoms, as some had feared it would do through a new global treaty. Instead, the draft that delegates approved barely mentions the Internet. The result wasn't exactly a victory for those who are committed to a free and open Internet, however. Although delegates rejected many of the worst proposals, they laid the groundwork for having governments, not Internet stakeholders, regulate the technical aspects of the Web. The agency's effort to update a 24-year-old global telecommunications treaty exposed a sharp rift between the developed countries that were the earliest adopters of the Internet and the developing world, particularly Russia, China and other authoritarian regimes.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Satellite Technology Management Inc.: The firm said this week it has received a $1.6-million contract from National Radio & Electronics Co. Ltd. of Bombay, India, for a satellite communications network. National Radio & Electronics is a unit of the Tata Group, India's largest conglomerate with annual sales of about $6 billion.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1988
Datron Systems, a Simi Valley maker of satellite communications and electronic systems, announced that it has sold a division--Datron Antennas in Dallas--to Penn Central Telecommunications of Woodcliff Lake, N.J. Datron Antennas makes antennas used in satellite communications. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The company also announced it has received a $7 million order from Ford Motor Co. for antennas and other equipment.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2008 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
At Boeing Co.'s sprawling satellite-making complex in El Segundo, engineers for decades pioneered space systems that helped vastly alter the way we communicate by telephone and watch television today. But in recent years, the workload has sputtered under a cloud of slow orders, and the aerospace giant is now hoping for a lifeline from an upcoming Pentagon contract potentially worth more than $15 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Marvin Chodorow, a former Stanford University physics professor who helped develop the klystron tube essential to radar and satellite communications systems, has died. He was 92. Chodorow died Oct. 17 of natural causes at his home on the Palo Alto campus, university officials announced. "Marvin was the leading figure in transmitting the lore of klystrons from industry to the Stanford community," Wolfgang K.H.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2004 | From Reuters
The auction for DirecTV Group's Hughes Network Systems is heating up, with at least a dozen potential buyers expressing interest in bidding for all or part of the division, people close to the sales process said this week. The unit, which includes the Direcway satellite communications division and Spaceway, a planned higher-speed satellite communications service, was put on the block this year in an auction that analysts said could generate $1 billion or more.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2001
* Loral Space & Communications Ltd. is abandoning its plan to offer high-speed Internet service to consumers, Chief Executive Bernard Schwartz said. Loral will stick with its main businesses, which include making satellites and leasing satellite communications capacity to corporate customers, Schwartz said at the Carmel Group's DBS 2001 conference in Los Angeles. Loral will act as a supplier of Internet and other broadband services to its customers rather than sell directly to consumers.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Since January, John Pike has been taking his own satellite pictures of the world's most secret military bases and then making them public on the Internet. The images and the debate they have provoked are an experiment in the high technology of democracy, for anyone now can share a view from orbit once reserved solely for those with the highest of superpower security clearances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2000 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Motorists driving along Winnetka Avenue near Prairie Street have probably noticed the huge satellite dishes going up on a three-acre site. The two giant dishes--soon to be joined by six more--are part of a satellite farm/headquarters building under construction for McKibben Communications--a "mom-and-pop" upstart in the teleport industry.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Craig McCaw about to carry the world past another technological milestone? That is what the satellite communications industry is hoping, at least. Because the Washington-based entrepreneur, a pioneer in cable television and cellular phones, has been focusing his attention and money on a business afflicted with bankruptcies and technological uncertainties.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the John F. Kennedy administration launched the world's first spy satellite, only senior U.S. military officials and policymakers have been allowed to view high-altitude, high-resolution images of everything from Soviet bombers to Serb tanks. Now the public is getting its chance, and some policy analysts say that's cause for concern.
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