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Satellite Images

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WORLD
March 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
A Chinese military agency on Wednesday released satellite imagery of large pieces of debris floating in the South China Sea along the planned flight path of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet with 239 on board, news agencies in Beijing reported. The images were captured early Sunday, a day after Malaysia Airlines flight 370 was last heard from on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, China's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said, the Associated Press quoted the New China News Agency as reporting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 26, 2014 | By Barbara Demick and W.J. Hennigan
BEIJING - Malaysian authorities said Wednesday that they were encouraged by new images from European satellites showing 122 floating objects off the Australian coast that could be debris from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet. The discovery bolstered hope of finding wreckage from the Boeing 777, believed to have crashed March 8 in the choppy seas 1,500 miles southwest of Perth. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said Thursday morning that 11 aircraft and five ships from the U.S., Australia, China and Japan had resumed the search, which will cover 30,000 square miles.
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WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
NASA released the first satellite images of post-earthquake and -tsunami flooding in northeastern Japan on Saturday. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured contrasting views of Japan's Sendai region at 10:30 a.m. Saturday and Feb. 26. Water appears black or dark blue and a thin, green line outlines the shore, which is above water, presumably preventing the floodwater from returning to sea. The "flood" label shows how far inland floodwaters extended.
WORLD
March 23, 2014 | By Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -- More satellite evidence emerged Sunday, this time from France, that there is possible airplane debris in the south Indian Ocean. Malaysia said it received new satellite images from French authorities showing "potential objects in the vicinity of the southern corridor," an area where a growing number of aircraft and ships have been combing for traces of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The search continued Sunday, but there was no word of any debris sightings.  The new French images add to other satellite reports released a day earlier by China and  Thursday by Australia that point to suspected debris roughly 1,500 miles southwest of Perth, capital of Western Australia.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Spurred by additional satellite leads, Australian officials on Sunday ramped up a multinational effort to comb a vast stretch of the south Indian Ocean for traces of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said eight military and civilian aircraft carrying 20 volunteer spotters - double the number used Saturday - would look for objects that were shown floating about 1,500 miles off...
SCIENCE
August 30, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A vast region of the Amazon forest in Brazil was home to a complex of ancient towns in which about 50,000 people lived, according to scientists assisted by satellite images of the region. The existence of the ancient settlements in the Upper Xingu region of the Amazon in north-central Brazil means that what many experts had considered virgin tropical forests were in fact heavily affected by past human activity, the scientists reported Thursday in the journal Science. The arrival of European colonists 500 years ago, and the diseases they brought with them, probably killed most of the inhabitants, the researchers said.
OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Let there be dark ,” Opinion, Dec. 21 A year ago I had the privilege of being one of the first scientists to see the nighttime satellite images of Earth that Paul Bogard refers to. Viewing the lights from East Asia, which represent a quarter of the planet's population, I was deeply moved. What stood out was the darkness of North Korea. Scientists who study these images have found a strong correlation between darkness and poverty. Although I applaud efforts to reduce artificial light pollution, we should not forget the benefits of electric lighting.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An “amazing” number of people have been scouring through satellite images to spot possible leads in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane. Satellite imagery provider DigitalGlobe said Tuesday that it was uploading more shots of the Gulf of Thailand to its Tomnod website , where anyone can scroll through images and tag what might be rafts, wreckage, oil slicks or other markers. Many people noticing the same thing in the same spot would trigger an alert on the company's end. The website was inaccessible to many visitors on Tuesday because of the "amazing" and “unprecedented” response from the Internet community.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
A satellite orbiting Earth has spotted 55 southern right whales hanging out in the shallow waters off Argentina. It turns out that these particular whales are quite easy to spot from space, said Peter Fretwell of the British Antarctic Survey. They got the name right whales because they were once considered the "right" whales to hunt. They are large and slow, and they spend a lot of time lolling near the surface of calm ocean waters. For this reason, their numbers dropped from a pre-whaling population of 55,000-70,000 to just 300 by the 1920s.  "The same reason they are the right whales to catch makes them the right whales to look for by satellite," said Fretwell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Hector Becerra
When it comes to Southern California's increasingly perilous fire season, you can blame it on the rain. That's the paradoxical case made by satellite data from NASA and India. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and at Chapman University said the satellites show the effects of a steady and largely forgettable rainfall that fell during a roughly four-day period at the end of January. JPL scientist Son Nghiem, the principal investigator in the project, said the rain came just as much of the vegetation throughout the region was awakening from a dormant stage.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - China said Saturday that its satellite spotted a large object floating in the south Indian Ocean area that has become a focal point in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane. A Chinese defense agency said on its website that satellite pictures taken around noon Tuesday showed an object measuring 74 feet by 43 feet, about 75 miles southwest of where Australia two days earlier captured images of two indistinct objects, one of them estimated at 79 feet long.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Spurred by additional satellite leads, Australian officials on Sunday ramped up a multinational effort to comb a vast stretch of the south Indian Ocean for traces of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said eight military and civilian aircraft carrying 20 volunteer spotters - double the number used Saturday - would look for objects that were shown floating about 1,500 miles off...
WORLD
March 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
A Chinese military agency on Wednesday released satellite imagery of large pieces of debris floating in the South China Sea along the planned flight path of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet with 239 on board, news agencies in Beijing reported. The images were captured early Sunday, a day after Malaysia Airlines flight 370 was last heard from on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, China's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said, the Associated Press quoted the New China News Agency as reporting.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
An “amazing” number of people have been scouring through satellite images to spot possible leads in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane. Satellite imagery provider DigitalGlobe said Tuesday that it was uploading more shots of the Gulf of Thailand to its Tomnod website , where anyone can scroll through images and tag what might be rafts, wreckage, oil slicks or other markers. Many people noticing the same thing in the same spot would trigger an alert on the company's end. The website was inaccessible to many visitors on Tuesday because of the "amazing" and “unprecedented” response from the Internet community.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
A satellite orbiting Earth has spotted 55 southern right whales hanging out in the shallow waters off Argentina. It turns out that these particular whales are quite easy to spot from space, said Peter Fretwell of the British Antarctic Survey. They got the name right whales because they were once considered the "right" whales to hunt. They are large and slow, and they spend a lot of time lolling near the surface of calm ocean waters. For this reason, their numbers dropped from a pre-whaling population of 55,000-70,000 to just 300 by the 1920s.  "The same reason they are the right whales to catch makes them the right whales to look for by satellite," said Fretwell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Hector Becerra
When it comes to Southern California's increasingly perilous fire season, you can blame it on the rain. That's the paradoxical case made by satellite data from NASA and India. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and at Chapman University said the satellites show the effects of a steady and largely forgettable rainfall that fell during a roughly four-day period at the end of January. JPL scientist Son Nghiem, the principal investigator in the project, said the rain came just as much of the vegetation throughout the region was awakening from a dormant stage.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two days after setting it free, space shuttle Discovery's astronauts retrieved a satellite brimming with hundreds of blazing images of the sun Tuesday. The smooth capture was a vindication of sorts for NASA, which botched an earlier attempt to use the satellite, Spartan, during a flight last year. Shuttle commander Curtis Brown Jr.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Google on Saturday released its first satellite images of Japan since the devastation that followed a massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake and tsunami that hit the island nation Friday afternoon local time. The images, from Google partner GeoEye, were generated by the IKONOS satellite. Google Earth users may view images from Kamaishi, located to the north of Sendai, an area extremely hard hit by the quake and tsunami. In the images, taken Saturday morning, Kamaishi is somewhat obscured by cloud clover.
OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Let there be dark ,” Opinion, Dec. 21 A year ago I had the privilege of being one of the first scientists to see the nighttime satellite images of Earth that Paul Bogard refers to. Viewing the lights from East Asia, which represent a quarter of the planet's population, I was deeply moved. What stood out was the darkness of North Korea. Scientists who study these images have found a strong correlation between darkness and poverty. Although I applaud efforts to reduce artificial light pollution, we should not forget the benefits of electric lighting.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
NASA released the first satellite images of post-earthquake and -tsunami flooding in northeastern Japan on Saturday. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured contrasting views of Japan's Sendai region at 10:30 a.m. Saturday and Feb. 26. Water appears black or dark blue and a thin, green line outlines the shore, which is above water, presumably preventing the floodwater from returning to sea. The "flood" label shows how far inland floodwaters extended.
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