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Satellite Transponder Leasing Corp

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BUSINESS
July 8, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
In the latest in a series of acquisitions aimed at expanding its satellite communications business, Hughes Aircraft Co. said Friday that it will buy the satellite leasing subsidiary of International Business Machines Corp. Hughes Aircraft's El Segundo-based Hughes Communications Inc. unit will buy all of IBM's Satellite Transponder Leasing Corp., which has two satellites in orbit and is readying a third for launch next June, Hughes said.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
In the latest in a series of acquisitions aimed at expanding its satellite communications business, Hughes Aircraft Co. said Friday that it will buy the satellite leasing subsidiary of International Business Machines Corp. Hughes Aircraft's El Segundo-based Hughes Communications Inc. unit will buy all of IBM's Satellite Transponder Leasing Corp., which has two satellites in orbit and is readying a third for launch next June, Hughes said.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1988
International Business Machines and Hughes Aircraft of Los Angeles announced that Hughes would purchase a minority stake in IBM's Satellite Transponder Leasing Corp. subsidiary. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but the companies said Hughes will have exclusive marketing rights for services provided by the IBM unit's communications satellites. Hughes will market the satellite services to corporate customers and the television news industry.
NEWS
September 9, 1988
A European Ariane rocket blasted off into space, lifting into orbit two American satellites destined to upgrade telephone and television service in the United States. Liftoff took place from the agency's launch site in French Guiana. Officials at the space center called the launch "a complete success."
NEWS
September 13, 1988
An American communications satellite owned by GTE Spacenet, launched last Thursday by a French Ariane rocket, was hurled into an incorrect orbit when an on-board rocket motor misfired, officials said. The G-Star 3 satellite, launched from the European Space Agency's jungle complex pad in French Guiana, was safely delivered to the correct preliminary orbit, as was another American communications satellite owned by Satellite Transponder Leasing Corp., by a French-built Ariane 3 rocket.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1988 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Most of the recent media attention surrounding the nation's space program has focused on Thursday's planned launch of Discovery, the first space shuttle to head into space since the ill-fated Challenger flight in January, 1986. But a series of less-publicized, unmanned rocket launches is playing an equally important role in the return to space, according to Air Force Secretary Edward C.
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