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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
On Feb. 14, a Hollywood delegation showed up at the White House. Motion Picture Academy President Hawk Koch, Oscar producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron and film mogul Harvey Weinstein had come to explore a rather important matter (for them): They wanted to see if they could secretly work out the details for Michelle Obama to present best picture at the Oscars 10 days later. Senior members of the first lady's team met with the group, discussing a series of questions from the big to the picayune, according to a person present who requested anonymity because the person was not authorized to talk about the meeting.
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BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE -- A 19-story white rocket successfully lifted a NASA science satellite into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base, located northwest of Santa Barbara. The picture-perfect launch, which took place Monday at 10:02 a.m. PST, occurred at the base's Space Launch Complex-3 along the Pacific Ocean. The Atlas V rocket, built by United Launch Alliance, boosted the Landsat 8 satellite about 410 miles above the Earth. The satellite's first signal was received 82 minutes into the mission at a ground station in Svalbard, Norway, the space agency said.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
United Airlines has been one of the last major airlines to jump into the business of offering on-board wireless Internet. But it's trying to make up for its tardiness. The Chicago-based carrier offers Wi-Fi in about 3% of its fleet of about 700 planes, one of the lowest rates of any major carrier in the nation, according to a recent study. But United recently became the first U.S.-based international carrier to offer satellite-based Wi-Fi Internet for passengers traveling on long-haul overseas flights.
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
South Korea's successful satellite launch this week served as the latest act of one-upmanship in an accelerating space race gripping Northeast Asia. Membership in the elite global space club is being pursued by wealthy countries that can afford it as well as economic basket cases that cannot, a quest for political stature driven more by emotion and nationalism than economic promise. What nations get out of creating their own space programs is a heady cocktail of national pride, technological muscle-flexing and the power to project military menace as a reminder to neighbors that they won't back down from the region's mounting territorial disputes.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A 20-story rocket carrying a massive communications satellite failed to reach orbit and fell into the ocean after being launched from a floating  platform near the equator. The failed launch is a potentially huge setback for the rocket venture Sea Launch, which exited bankruptcy protection in late 2010 and has major operations in Long Beach. Late Thursday, Sea Launch said that about 40 seconds after liftoff all telemetry was lost, indicating a loss of mission.  The company said it will establish a board to determine the root cause of the incident.
WORLD
January 30, 2013 | By Jung-yoon Choi and Barbara Demick
SEOUL -- In danger of falling behind in the space race on the Korean peninsula, the South Korean government announced Wednesday that it had successfully launched a rocket into space. Pressure had been mounting ever since mid-December when communist arch-rival North Korea managed to launch a multi-stage rocket and put a satellite into orbit. South Korea's Satellite Launch Vehicle-1, also known as Naro, blasted off at 4 p.m. local time from a space center in Jeolla province on the southwestern coast.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
NASA is preparing to launch the eighth observation satellite in the Landsat remote sensing program that has chronicled changes in the Earth's land cover for four decades. Landsat 8, set for a Feb. 11 launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, will be equipped with instruments capable of more sensitive data collection than its predecessors. “This will be the best Landsat satellite ever in terms of quality and quantity,” said NASA project scientist Jim Irons. The satellite will circle the Earth about 14 times a day, 438 miles above the planet, recording observations in different wavelengths along a 115-mile-wide swath and orbiting over the same point every 16 days.
WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - When North Korea launched a small satellite into orbit last month for the first time, U.S. officials called it a cover for a more ominous goal: a ballistic missile that could carry a nuclear weapon as far as the continental United States. But North Korea is a long way from building a workable intercontinental missile and, at the current pace of testing, it could take many years before they are close, missile technology experts say. "They could put up something that would look like a credible missile but ... it's not really much of a threat," said Boston-based physicist David Wright, who follows the North Korean program for the nonpartisan Union of Concerned Scientists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012 | By August Brown
The Henry Clay People performed on New Year's Eve at the Satellite last year, and by all accounts it was a Champagne-saturated bacchanal of indie rockers letting their hair down. They'll reprise it this year with a set to wrap up their December residency, which is celebrating their 10th anniversary as a band. Torches, Kissing Cousins and the Lonely Wild join them, and if your heart still lies with fuzz-blasted rock tunes and stage-diving frontmen, this is where you want to watch the ball drop (or ignore the ball-drop to spray someone with PBR)
SCIENCE
December 18, 2012 | By Amina Khan
Is North Korea's satellite dead in orbit? Launched last week, the spacecraft seems to be tumbling overhead, according to astronomers keeping track of the device. “At this stage I'm getting a bit skeptical,” Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said in an interview.  “I would start to be mildly surprised if the satellite is really working.” Retired astronomer Greg Roberts in Cape Town, South Africa, measured the light coming from the satellite orbiting roughly 300 miles above the Earth's surface and found that it seems to grow bright and dim by turns, indicating that it's spinning as it flies through space, McDowell said.
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