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OPINION
January 9, 2013
Re "The trouble with satire," Postscript, Jan. 5 I was one of those taken in by Daniel Akst's satirical piece - sort of. I recognized that the Dec. 28 article, which Op-Ed editor Sue Horton clarified was satire, was completely wacko, but I also know that The Times publishes opinions that are opposed to its editorial position, we presume, to open a window on "what's out there. " What makes Akst's position possibly serious is that it's really not that far removed from reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - John Oliver will have the crab cakes - but that's all, thanks. In a private dining room at HBO's plush headquarters overlooking Bryant Park in midtown Manhattan, a waitress in a crisp black uniform asks the 37-year-old comedian if he'd like anything else - perhaps some soup or salad? He declines with a polite insistence that suggests he's not quite used to all the luxurious trappings. Then, as soon as the waitress leaves the room, he launches into a riff about possibly sinister deeds going on behind the scenes at HBO. "I don't know what happens here," he says, "This is, like, unsettlingly nice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1987
I object to Conrad's cartoon (March 12), equating a major maritime tragedy in Belgium to Ronald Reagan's economic policies. The death of human beings in a tragedy that is totally unrelated to Reaganomics is a vulgar form of satire. W. JAMES NETHERLY Santa Ana
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn and Chris O'Brien
REDWOOD CITY, Calif. - Silicon Valley, with its influence and economic clout soaring to all-time highs, is having its pop culture moment. But the stream of movies, books, even a reality TV show spotlighting nerdy start-up culture have all been widely panned locally as cheap caricatures. With Sunday's kickoff of Mike Judge's "Silicon Valley" comedy series on HBO, the geeks here say Hollywood finally gets them - even as it mocks them. "It was like watching a bizarro version of your own reality," said Tesla Motors Chief Executive Elon Musk, after the Silicon Valley premiere Wednesday night at this city's historic Fox Theatre, where stars of the show walked the red carpet and the tech glitterati came out in force.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Philip Brandes
There are misbegotten plays so bad they're good, and satire so good it's great, but you rarely get both in the same show. Thanks to its intricate farce-within-a-farce construction, Michael Frayn's “Noises Off” efficiently packs a fair number of two-for-one laughs in an appropriately frenetic revival from Ventura's Rubicon Theatre. Slamming doors (11 of them) and double entendres abound as the backstage romantic entanglements of a hapless theater troupe collide with the bedroom antics of a dreadful sex comedy they're attempting to perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2003
After the sadly ridiculous Dame Edna melodrama comes Asian American improv group Cold Tofu's declaration letting us all know what is racist and what is satire after their viewing of a comedy skit performed by the Liquid Radio Players ("A Spoof That Did Not Amuse," Feb. 23). Satire assumes one thing, which is the viewers' basic knowledge of the object that its humor is commenting upon. Of course Fu Manchu was an outrageous stereotype. That's why its use by the Eurocentric media in the first half of the 20th century is comical.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn and Chris O'Brien
REDWOOD CITY, Calif. - Silicon Valley, with its influence and economic clout soaring to all-time highs, is having its pop culture moment. But the stream of movies, books, even a reality TV show spotlighting nerdy start-up culture have all been widely panned locally as cheap caricatures. With Sunday's kickoff of Mike Judge's "Silicon Valley" comedy series on HBO, the geeks here say Hollywood finally gets them - even as it mocks them. "It was like watching a bizarro version of your own reality," said Tesla Motors Chief Executive Elon Musk, after the Silicon Valley premiere Wednesday night at this city's historic Fox Theatre, where stars of the show walked the red carpet and the tech glitterati came out in force.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
At times"God Bless America"feels more like an assault weapon than a movie, possibly an AK-47. This funny, sick twist of social satire is certainly locked and loaded, even if its aim is sometimes off. The central character is Frank (Joel Murray), a vigilante of virtue who targets the irritants of modern times - reality TV stars, bratty teens, people who check cellphones in movies and a judge on a talent show who sounds a lot like Simon Cowell. The commentary that runs through Frank's head is accompanied by a ton of blood and guts splattered all over the place because, frankly, writer-director Bobcat Goldthwait has a lot he wants to get off his chest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2011 | By Lee Romney and Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
A UC Berkeley student group is stirring support and outrage nationwide over its planned bake sale Tuesday that is pricing items according to a buyer's race, ethnicity and gender. The satirical event — titled the Increase Diversity Bake Sale — is a reprise of similar cookie sales held on college campuses by Republican clubs over the years. It was scheduled to counter another student-led effort urging Gov. Jerry Brown to sign a bill to allow California's public universities to consider race, ethnicity and gender in student admissions as long as no preference is given.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2013 | By Noel Murray
No Sony, $30.99; Blu-ray, $35.99 Available on VOD beginning Tuesday Formidable Chilean filmmaker Pablo Larrain does his best work with the sly satire rooted in history - and a recent Oscar nominee for foreign-language film. Gael García Bernal stars as a young advertising executive, hired to craft a campaign arguing for the ouster of President Augusto Pinochet. "No" fictionalizes an actual event, but Larrain also comments on political fervor, social change and how the superficial appeal of packaging can affect both.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Philip Brandes
There are misbegotten plays so bad they're good, and satire so good it's great, but you rarely get both in the same show. Thanks to its intricate farce-within-a-farce construction, Michael Frayn's “Noises Off” efficiently packs a fair number of two-for-one laughs in an appropriately frenetic revival from Ventura's Rubicon Theatre. Slamming doors (11 of them) and double entendres abound as the backstage romantic entanglements of a hapless theater troupe collide with the bedroom antics of a dreadful sex comedy they're attempting to perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Jean-Claude Van Damme - don't! Don't go into the jungle! No matter what the title says, there is no welcome waiting for you. Before the nonsensical "Welcome to the Jungle" is barely underway, the "Universal Soldier" goes sadly soft; Van Damme's Storm is reduced to a whimpering shower. There is no "Double Impact" where he is concerned, or really any impact. BEST MOVIES OF 2013: Turan | Sharkey | Olsen The former black-ops hero he plays is now a corporate consultant brought in to run a weekend team-building retreat for a packaging-design company whose main client appears to be toilet paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The only real response to a thuddingly unfunny vigilante satire like "May I Kill U" is, "Well, I hope that filmmaker got something out of his system. " Writer-director Stuart Urban's movie introduces us to bicycle cop Baz (Kevin Bishop), who doesn't have the best response to getting hit on the head by looters during 2011 riots in London: He quickly decides to start murdering transgressors, filming his deeds with his helmet-cam, then uploading the footage so he can become a death-wish social media darling.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
Joe Carroll is not dead, Ryan Hardy is not “done” and the baby-serial-killer demo is growing faster than Netflix. But still, we have to wonder: Is anyone still following “The Following"? When the grisly Fox drama premiered last year, the buzz centered on Kevin Bacon, whose decision to play FBI Agent Hardy on a broadcast network procedural added bling to TV's new Golden Age. Also a fount of arterial-spray. After a premiere bathed in blood, the conversation changed. So much blood!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Jean Lowe is not an illusionist in the conventional sense of the term. Her painted images and papier-mache sculptures don't typically fool the eye by closely resembling the things they represent. Her game has more to do with the machinations of the mind, the conflations and confusions between what we know, want and believe. Maybe a better term for her would be delusionist, for she stabs satirically at broad-scale practices of deception, as well as personal patterns of self-deception.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Susan King
Producer Norman Lear had turned the family sitcom on its head in 1971 with his groundbreaking CBS comedy series "All in the Family. " Five years later, he revolutionized the soap opera with his weeknight satire "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman," starring Louise Lasser as a suburban housewife living in the fictional town of Fernwood, Ohio, obsessed with Reader's Digest and consumerism. In fact, in the series' first episode, Mary's more concerned about the waxy yellow buildup on her kitchen floor than an entire family - plus their goats and chickens - having been murdered in her neighborhood.
NEWS
August 11, 2005 | Don Shirley
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization is asking Justin Tanner to remove any elements from his play "Oklahomo!," now running in Burbank, that are derived from the musical "Oklahoma!" Tanner contends that the only two parts of the play that quote from "Oklahoma!" -- with altered lyrics -- are so brief that he hopes the organization's viewpoint will change after it receives a script that Tanner says is being sent. Bert Fink, a spokesman for Rodgers & Hammerstein, said the "Oklahomo!"
OPINION
November 10, 2006 | Hart Seely, HART SEELY is the creator of "Pieces of Intelligence: The Existential Poetry of Donald H. Rumsfeld."
IT'S BEEN A dark week for satire. Within 48 hours, two of the world's great punch-line generators -- Kevin Federline, alias "Mr. Britney Spears," and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld -- abruptly punched out. Not since Oct. 10, 1973 -- when Vice President Spiro T. Agnew resigned just hours after Elvis and Priscilla Presley unplugged their marriage -- has topical humor received such a body blow. Rumsfeld is the bigger loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
How do you represent a hundred years of a nation's moviemaking, especially when the country is one as vast and complex as China? In what it's calling a "preliminary" sampling, the UCLA Film & Television Archive is offering Angelenos the chance to experience a striking array of selections of Chinese cinema, from the silent gems of Shanghai's Golden Age to recently unearthed midcentury satires and more familiar art-house hits such as 2000's "In the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Bob Pool
To understand how ugly the battle over the Hollywood sign has become, just look at the fliers that have been popping up recently in the hillside neighborhoods below the landmark. In a call to arms, the fliers warn of the tourists who swarm in "like locusts from all across the world" and suggest the city establish "armed checkpoints. " The anonymous author then makes a radical proposal: Dismantle the Hollywood sign. It's a joke, of course. But for both residents and city officials, it's evidence that the long-running debate about sightseer traffic around the Hollywood sign is reaching a tipping point.
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