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Satsuki Eda

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WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The upper house of Japan's Parliament elected a Democratic Party of Japan lawmaker as its president, the first time an opposition member has held the post. The party gained dominance in the upper house in July 29 elections. Satsuki Eda was chosen unanimously following the crushing defeat of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling party. Abe's ruling coalition still controls the more powerful lower house, which chooses the prime minister.
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WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The upper house of Japan's Parliament elected a Democratic Party of Japan lawmaker as its president, the first time an opposition member has held the post. The party gained dominance in the upper house in July 29 elections. Satsuki Eda was chosen unanimously following the crushing defeat of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling party. Abe's ruling coalition still controls the more powerful lower house, which chooses the prime minister.
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NEWS
August 9, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa today appointed three women and the leaders of all six lower house parties supporting him in a coalition government to Cabinet posts. The appointments guaranteed that the seven coalition parties, which individually support a rainbow of policies, will be in contact at the highest level at least twice a week when the Cabinet meets.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of their commitment Wednesday to form a Japanese coalition government, leaders of seven opposition parties prepared to meet today to complete a platform and perhaps name their candidate for prime minister. The coalition, mustering about 20 more votes in Parliament than the long-ruling Liberal Democrats, would be Japan's first since 1948.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A century ago, the overlords of Japan's outlying provinces overthrew the crumbling, 250-year-old Tokugawa shogunate and ushered Japan into the modern age. Today, a descendant of one of those overlords and a two-time governor of the distant southern prefecture of Kumamoto says it is once again time for outsiders to shake up Tokyo politics.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When environmentalists in southern Japan started worrying that the chemical runoff from a proposed golf course would pollute an unspoiled island, they asked local officials for a copy of the environmental impact report--and were told that it was none of their business. "In democratic countries like America, this may seem hard to believe, but the reason they gave was that ordinary people would not be able to understand the technical language," said attorney Ryuji Nishida.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When leprosy patients Tamiichi Tanaka and his wife, Mie, discovered she was pregnant soon after their wedding, they cried with fear and tried to keep her condition a secret. After Mie started to show, however, doctors at the government-run leprosarium here forced her to have an abortion, and sterilized him to make sure it didn't happen again. "I can never let go of this memory.
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