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Saturday Night Fever Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
JOHN TRAVOLTA remembers the moment in December 1977 when Pauline Kael's rave review of "Saturday Night Fever" came out in the New Yorker magazine. "I was at the Plaza Hotel," says Travolta. "The New Yorker came out and I saw my manager cry. She was his favorite critic, and the idea that she got what he always felt about me was really moving to him. He was deemed right for choosing me and representing me." And life, he says, "started again at that time for me.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
JOHN TRAVOLTA remembers the moment in December 1977 when Pauline Kael's rave review of "Saturday Night Fever" came out in the New Yorker magazine. "I was at the Plaza Hotel," says Travolta. "The New Yorker came out and I saw my manager cry. She was his favorite critic, and the idea that she got what he always felt about me was really moving to him. He was deemed right for choosing me and representing me." And life, he says, "started again at that time for me.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop culture has a way of poking you in the ribs sometimes. My most memorable poke came a few years ago watching the Farm Aid concert on television with an old friend when suddenly his teen-age daughter walked into the room and, pointing to a scraggly Bob Dylan, shouted "Eeeuuu!" So much for the raptures of the counterculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop culture has a way of poking you in the ribs sometimes. My most memorable poke came a few years ago watching the Farm Aid concert on television with an old friend when suddenly his teen-age daughter walked into the room and, pointing to a scraggly Bob Dylan, shouted "Eeeuuu!" So much for the raptures of the counterculture.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
In the "thirtysomething" era of aerobics videos for kids, fetal phones to talk to the not-yet-born and gourmet baby food, it seems inevitable that someone would produce music for infants. Fivesomething years ago, record industry veteran Ellen Wohlstadter, 35, was searching for music to play for her newborn son, Jason. Finding nothing she liked, she and her husband, David, 36, produced their own cassette with a variety of traditional lullabies such as "Rock-A-Bye-Baby," with ballads they grew up listening to written by the Beatles and other artists.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
In the "thirtysomething" era of aerobics videos for kids, fetal phones to talk to the not-yet-born and gourmet baby food, it seems inevitable that someone would produce music for infants. Fivesomething years ago, record industry veteran Ellen Wohlstadter, now 35, was searching for music to play for her newborn son, Jason. Finding nothing she liked, she and her husband, David, now 36, produced their own cassette with a variety of traditional lullabies such as "Rock-a-Bye-Baby" with ballads they grew up listening to written by the Beatles and other artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1994 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How badly do fans want Disney's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" on home video? * Tania Steele, vice president of publicity and marketing for Buena Vista Home Video--which releases Disney tapes--offers this gauge. "Last year my office alone got 15,000 letters about it," she reported. "It's consistently been the most demanded of all the animated features." The company announced earlier this week that "Snow White" is finally coming to video this year.
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