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October 24, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL
Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione announced Friday that he will buy Saturday Review, the once-esteemed former literary magazine that has been on the brink of extinction in recent years. Guccione, who is best known for publishing magazines whose appeal have largely to do with sex, did not disclose financial details. When Saturday Review's owners, Manhattan Media Corp., put the magazine up for sale a year ago, however, potential buyers had balked at the $3.5-million asking price.
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BUSINESS
October 24, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL
Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione announced Friday that he will buy Saturday Review, the once-esteemed former literary magazine that has been on the brink of extinction in recent years. Guccione, who is best known for publishing magazines whose appeal have largely to do with sex, did not disclose financial details. When Saturday Review's owners, Manhattan Media Corp., put the magazine up for sale a year ago, however, potential buyers had balked at the $3.5-million asking price.
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October 7, 2004 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
Maurice Wilkins, who played a critical role in discovering the structure of DNA but whose contributions were long overshadowed by James Watson and Francis Crick, died Tuesday at a London hospital. He was 88. The discovery of DNA's double helix structure -- considered one of the towering achievements of the 20th century and perhaps all of scientific history -- is key to understanding the primary genetic blueprint for life.
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October 8, 1988
Norman Cousins, internationally famous author and lecturer on world affairs, will be the featured speaker Oct. 24 at the end of a three-day United Nations Celebration at the Irvine Marriott Hotel. Entitled "An Evening with Norman Cousins," the event will begin at 6:30 p.m. with a reception, followed by a 7:30 p.m. dinner at which Cousins will speak. Cousins, for 35 years the editor of Saturday Review magazine, now is an adjunct professor at UCLA's School of Medicine.
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August 14, 1985 | HERBERT J. VIDA
When Saturday Review magazine printed the picture of a striking honey-limbed, blue-eyed blonde in a bathing suit on its cover with the headline "Sex Sells," the model had mixed emotions. "I thought it was interesting, and I was excited my picture would be on the cover of the Saturday Review," said Gail Smith, 22, a model and aspiring actress who now lives in Huntington Beach, "but I think pretty girls can help sell magazines without bringing sex into it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Selma Jeanne Cohen, who brought the field of dance scholarship to a new level of visibility and respect with the publication in 1998 of the six-volume International Encyclopedia of Dance, has died. She was 85. Cohen died Dec. 23 at her home in New York City, reportedly of complications from Alzheimer's disease. In a field often dominated by cant and jargon, Cohen's emphasis on key issues of performance and perception remained refreshing -- and brave.
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March 4, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Nathan Wright Jr., an Episcopal minister and scholar who was a leading voice in the debate over black power in the 1960s, has died. He was 81. Wright died Feb. 22 of diabetes at his home in East Stroudsburg, Pa., according to his son, Chi Wright. Erudite and sophisticated, Wright was the author of 18 books, many of them dealing with race in America. He also wrote poetry, a book of sermons and a volume on Christian philosophy.
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February 19, 1996 | SARAH SHAPIRO, Sarah Shapiro was raised in Los Angeles and now lives in and writes from Jerusalem
When Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated by a man who calls himself an Orthodox Jew, all religious Jews found themselves under the vast shadow cast by his crime. If Yigal Amir could commit murder in the name of God, claim to have found sanction for his deed in religious texts and imagine that he might favorably impress his judges by saying he had only intended to paralyze his target, then not only religious Jews but Torah Judaism itself is seen as suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Barry Tunick, a retired high school English teacher who appreciated alliteration and reveled in puns and used them in co-creating the crossword puzzle that has run Sundays in the Los Angeles Times since 1980, has died. He was 72. Tunick died Saturday at his Culver City home after a short battle with leukemia, his family said. "He was one of the first to bring a witty, contemporary sense of humor to puzzle clues.
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December 4, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Hollis Alpert, a film critic and author who co-founded the National Society of Film Critics more than 40 years ago in the living room of his New York City apartment, has died. He was 91. Alpert died of pneumonia and respiratory failure Nov. 18 at Naples Community Hospital in Naples, Fla., said Lacey King, a friend.
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