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NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Get a close-up look at Saturn and its spectacular rings this weekend, and you won't need special eclipse glasses to see them. Telescopes at the Griffith Observatory in Griffith Park will be pointed at Saturn because it's one of the brightest things in the night sky at the moment. "Mars and Saturn are nearly twins in brightness this week," the observatory's Sky Report says. Saturn also made news this week after the Cassini spacecraft found evidence of large methane lakes on its moon Titan.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | David Lazarus
Karen drives a 2003 Saturn Vue. She says it's experiencing the same ignition troubles that have resulted in the recall of about 2.6 million General Motors vehicles. So far, only the Saturn Ion and the Saturn Sky are part of the recall. The Vue is not. Karen wants to know what she should do in a situation like this. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions She's not alone. I found a number of other Vue owners online who say they, too, are experiencing ignition issues.
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NATIONAL
October 25, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Saturn burped and the Cassini spacecraft was on hand to witness it. The spacecraft, orbiting Saturn, has gathered data on a two-year-long storm that wrapped all the way around the planet -- followed by a record-setting 150-degree temperature spike and a massive burp of ethylene gas. It was a mega-belch of energy, according to NASA -- "100 times more ethylene than scientists thought possible for Saturn. " PHOTOS: Awesome images from space Simultaneously, the temperature at the site of the release shot up to minus 64 degrees Fahrenheit.  The study's lead author, Brigette Hesman, a scientist at the University of Maryland, said, "To get a temperature change of the same scale on Earth, you'd be going from the depths of winter in Fairbanks, Alaska, to the height of summer in the Mojave Desert.
SCIENCE
April 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
The moons that orbit Saturn may be increasing by one -- an icy, pint-sized object that astronomers have named “Peggy.” NASA's Cassini spacecraft has spotted evidence that a mysterious object measuring perhaps half a mile across is disturbing the outer edge of Saturn's large, bright A ring. The object's gravity seems to have roughed up the ring's usually smooth profile. PHOTOS: Amazing close-ups of moons As a result, a stretch of the A ring that measures 750 miles long and 6 miles wide is now about 20% brighter than it would typically appear.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Once every 30 years or so, a massive storm rages on Saturn, mixing up the atmosphere and revealing some of the ringed planet's hidden secrets.  The most recent Saturn mega-storm arrived about 10 years ahead of schedule and lasted from December 2010 through August 2011, said Lawrence Sromovsky, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The storm grew quickly from a small white dot first detected by NASA's Cassini probe on Dec. 5, 2010, to a spot about the size of Earth by the end of the month.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Saturn's rings are not just beautiful to look at; it turns out they are also responsible for rain falling on the planet.  Using data collected from the Keck Observatory in Hawaii, scientists found that the amount of "ring rain"--when water particles fall from Saturn's rings onto the planet below--is significantly more than previously thought, and may be responsible for the pattern of dark bands or shadows that appear on the planet's surface....
SCIENCE
August 1, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Enceladus, the icy moon that circles Saturn and shoots out jets of water, emits a much larger amount of water at the farthest point in its orbit, according to a new study published in the journal Nature. The discovery backs up a years-old theory and provides the researchers with fresh insight into this geophysically intriguing body. Enceladus, named after one of the giant children of mother Earth in Greek mythology, has long intrigued planetary scientists (as well as astrobiologists wondering if primitive life could exist in extreme environments)
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Images of a massive hurricane raging inside a strange hexagonal weather pattern at Saturn's north pole have recently been released by NASA , revealing a mystery inside an even bigger mystery. The hurricane is enormous and violent--more than 20 times the size of the average hurricane on Earth, with winds gusting at speeds four times what they would be on our planet. The hurricane appears to be fixed at Saturn's north pole, rather than drifting around the planet like hurricanes do here.
BOOKS
August 14, 1994
In his review of several books on the Apollo space program (Book Review, July 3, 1994), writer Terry Bisson claims, "Neither America nor Russia could (put a man on the moon) today. The blueprints for the F-1 engines are lost . . . " The belief that the blueprints for the Saturn V engines (and the rocket itself) have been lost is nothing more than a continually propagated misconception. The blueprints for the Saturn V rocket are stored on microfilm at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the Federal Archives in East Point, Ga., also house 2,900 cubic feet of Saturn documents.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Saturn's strange hexagon is coming into better focus. A six-sided weather pattern is churning over Saturn's north pole, and thanks to new data collected by NASA's Cassini mission, scientists -- and the rest of us -- can now see it with more clarity than ever before. The hexagon shape you see wobbling in the video above is a fast-blowing jet stream of 200-mph winds. The pattern spans 20,000 miles, and the dark area in its center, located directly over the north pole, is a massive hurricane with an eye 50 times larger than the largest one seen on Earth.
SCIENCE
April 9, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have uncovered the oldest cardiovascular system they've ever found in a fossil, in the form of a shrimp-like animal that once roamed the turbulent ancient seas. The finding, described in the journal Nature Communications, shows that the internal systems in the ancestors of modern crustaceans may have been much more complicated than scientists might have thought. The 520-million-year-old fossil of an ancient arthropod (the group that today includes crustaceans, insects and arachnids)
SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Amina Khan
A solar flare flashed on the turbulent surface of the sun last week - and NASA captured the moment in a video. The agency's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched as balletic lines of light swirled and grew to produce the M-class flare. Solar flares get letter grades to categorize their strength. The weakest ones are A-class; then come B, C, M and finally X class. Each letter class is 10 times stronger than the one before it. Numbers attached to each letter put a finer point on each flare's power.
SCIENCE
April 4, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have found strong evidence of a watery sea beneath the icy surface of Enceladus, a moon that orbits Saturn and squirts jets of water vapor into one of the planet's rings. The dramatic jets, which emerge from cracks in the moon's surface, have long tantalized scientists looking for signs of liquid water elsewhere in the solar system. Now, using gravitational data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, the researchers have determined that Enceladus hosts a vast southern sea roughly the size of Lake Superior.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and Jim Puzzanghera
As General Motors Co. heads into congressional hearings examining its failure to fix a deadly safety defect, the automaker has moved swiftly to burnish its safety credentials by recalling millions of vehicles. GM said Monday that it will set aside $750 million in the first quarter to pay for repairs even as it recalled an additional 1.5 million vehicles. The car company has now called back about 5 million vehicles in the last two months to fix problems including faulty power steering systems, oil leaks and fractured axle shafts.
AUTOS
March 31, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
As General Motors Co. heads into key congressional hearings Tuesday over a safety defect linked to 13 deaths, the automaker announced it would recall an additional 1.5 million vehicles globally and take a $750-million charge against its first-quarter earnings. GM told the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Monday that it would recall more than 1.3 million vehicles in the United States that may experience a sudden loss of electric power steering assist. It will recall 200,000 outside the U.S. The charge will set aside money to pay for this latest recall and a slew of similar auctions over the last two months.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
General Motors Co. recalled an additional 824,000 vehicles in the U.S. as it continued to deal with the fallout of a faulty ignition switch linked to a series of crashes and at least 12 deaths. The automaker said it is calling back Chevrolet Cobalts, Pontiac G5s and Solstices as well as Saturn Ions and Skys from the 2008-11 model years. It also recalled the Chevrolet HHR from the 2008-11 model years. Although the cars were built with an ignition switch that has had no problems, they might have been repaired with faulty switches left in the parts bins at dealers and auto shops, said Jim Cain, a GM spokesman.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Earthlings, get ready to say cheese! NASA's Cassini spacecraft will be taking your picture next month -- from 898 million miles away. If you happen to have your eyes closed or your hair is out of place, don't worry. All of planet Earth will fit into 1.5 pixels in the final image. Most of the frame will be filled by Saturn and its gigantic rings (though some of the edges will be cut off). Scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge are taking the picture - actually, a mosaic of images - because they can. It just so happens that Cassini and the sun will be on opposite sides of Saturn, allowing the spacecraft to see the planet and its famous rings with unusual clarity.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Now that spring is here, maybe it's time to grab your surfboard and head to some far-off coastline -- perhaps as far as the outer solar system. Scientists using NASA's Cassini spacecraft have found hints of waves sloshing on Titan, Saturn's largest moon - the first time waves like those in Earth's oceans have ever been found on another world. Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Jupiter's moon Ganymede, and it's sometimes called a planet-like moon: It's the only other world in our neighborhood to feature stable bodies of liquid on its surface, and it has a thick atmosphere made mostly of nitrogen.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Now that spring is here, maybe it's time to grab your surfboard and head to some far-off coastline -- perhaps as far as the outer solar system. Scientists using NASA's Cassini spacecraft have found hints of waves sloshing on Titan, Saturn's largest moon - the first time waves like those in Earth's oceans have ever been found on another world. Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Jupiter's moon Ganymede, and it's sometimes called a planet-like moon: It's the only other world in our neighborhood to feature stable bodies of liquid on its surface, and it has a thick atmosphere made mostly of nitrogen.
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