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Saturn Planet

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NEWS
October 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Wind strong enough to carry rocket debris down the coast forced NASA on Monday to postpone the launch of Cassini, the Saturn-bound spacecraft powered by 72 pounds of plutonium. Last-minute computer problems with the spacecraft and ground equipment contributed to the delay. NASA said it would try again Wednesday. "I love it!" protester Kevin Marsh said. "They call it the winds. I call it the hand of God." Marsh was the only demonstrator in sight when the countdown was halted before dawn.
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SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Once every 30 years or so, a massive storm rages on Saturn, mixing up the atmosphere and revealing some of the ringed planet's hidden secrets.  The most recent Saturn mega-storm arrived about 10 years ahead of schedule and lasted from December 2010 through August 2011, said Lawrence Sromovsky, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The storm grew quickly from a small white dot first detected by NASA's Cassini probe on Dec. 5, 2010, to a spot about the size of Earth by the end of the month.
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NEWS
September 22, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Whipple has already told his boss he won't be at work. Maria Telesca-Whipple has rehearsed loading the couple's two young children and a few belongings into the car. If NASA's rocket to Saturn blasts off as scheduled Oct. 13, they won't be here to see it. "We're going to Daytona Beach, wherever, until the launch is over," said Telesca-Whipple, 37. "I don't think it's safe. And I'm trying to drill it into the heads of every mother with children that they should leave."
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Cassini spacecraft came so close to Venus Sunday that it was able to add 16,300 mph to its velocity, shortening its scheduled trip to Saturn. The international space mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency passed within 176 miles of Venus on Sunday morning, completing a "gravity assist" in which Cassini uses a planet's gravity like a slingshot.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Saturn sailed across the heavens with a diamond in its rings Monday morning, dazzling mortals on a distant planet. Witnessing the event were thousands of amateur and professional astronomers who traveled to the high country throughout the Southwest so they could take part in a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. And Saturn, one of the most popular objects in the sky because of its spectacular rings, did not let them down.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
No doubt about it, the element plutonium has a bad name. It's the stuff of nuclear bombs. It causes cancer. It's named after the god of hell--Pluto. It was even given the chemical call letters Pu quite deliberately, "as a joke," said its 1941 discoverer, UC Berkeley Nobel laureate Glenn Seaborg. Recently, plutonium has gained new notoriety as NASA prepares to launch the Cassini mission to Saturn, which will carry 72 pounds of plutonium as a power source.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Cassini spacecraft came so close to Venus Sunday that it was able to add 16,300 mph to its velocity, shortening its scheduled trip to Saturn. The international space mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency passed within 176 miles of Venus on Sunday morning, completing a "gravity assist" in which Cassini uses a planet's gravity like a slingshot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
A new moon only 12 miles in diameter has been discovered orbiting the planet Saturn, NASA has announced. The tiny sphere was found by planetary scientist Mark Showalter of NASA's Ames Research Laboratory in Mountain View through analysis of pictures taken nine years ago by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The moon's presence had been predicted because of a disturbance in a 200-mile-wide gap, called the Encke gap, in Saturn's outermost major ring, the "A" ring.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Once every 30 years or so, a massive storm rages on Saturn, mixing up the atmosphere and revealing some of the ringed planet's hidden secrets.  The most recent Saturn mega-storm arrived about 10 years ahead of schedule and lasted from December 2010 through August 2011, said Lawrence Sromovsky, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The storm grew quickly from a small white dot first detected by NASA's Cassini probe on Dec. 5, 2010, to a spot about the size of Earth by the end of the month.
SCIENCE
July 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A cluster of large hydrocarbon lakes has been spotted on Titan, Saturn's planet-size moon, scientists reported this week. The lakes near Titan's north pole were spied during a Cassini spacecraft flyby last weekend within 590 miles of the moon. Researchers counted about a dozen lakes six to 62 miles wide. Some lakes, which appeared as dark patches in radar images, were connected by channels; others had tributaries flowing into them. Several were dried up.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Wind strong enough to carry rocket debris down the coast forced NASA on Monday to postpone the launch of Cassini, the Saturn-bound spacecraft powered by 72 pounds of plutonium. Last-minute computer problems with the spacecraft and ground equipment contributed to the delay. NASA said it would try again Wednesday. "I love it!" protester Kevin Marsh said. "They call it the winds. I call it the hand of God." Marsh was the only demonstrator in sight when the countdown was halted before dawn.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Whipple has already told his boss he won't be at work. Maria Telesca-Whipple has rehearsed loading the couple's two young children and a few belongings into the car. If NASA's rocket to Saturn blasts off as scheduled Oct. 13, they won't be here to see it. "We're going to Daytona Beach, wherever, until the launch is over," said Telesca-Whipple, 37. "I don't think it's safe. And I'm trying to drill it into the heads of every mother with children that they should leave."
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
No doubt about it, the element plutonium has a bad name. It's the stuff of nuclear bombs. It causes cancer. It's named after the god of hell--Pluto. It was even given the chemical call letters Pu quite deliberately, "as a joke," said its 1941 discoverer, UC Berkeley Nobel laureate Glenn Seaborg. Recently, plutonium has gained new notoriety as NASA prepares to launch the Cassini mission to Saturn, which will carry 72 pounds of plutonium as a power source.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
A new moon only 12 miles in diameter has been discovered orbiting the planet Saturn, NASA has announced. The tiny sphere was found by planetary scientist Mark Showalter of NASA's Ames Research Laboratory in Mountain View through analysis of pictures taken nine years ago by the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The moon's presence had been predicted because of a disturbance in a 200-mile-wide gap, called the Encke gap, in Saturn's outermost major ring, the "A" ring.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Saturn sailed across the heavens with a diamond in its rings Monday morning, dazzling mortals on a distant planet. Witnessing the event were thousands of amateur and professional astronomers who traveled to the high country throughout the Southwest so they could take part in a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. And Saturn, one of the most popular objects in the sky because of its spectacular rings, did not let them down.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Images of a massive hurricane raging inside a strange hexagonal weather pattern at Saturn's north pole have recently been released by NASA , revealing a mystery inside an even bigger mystery. The hurricane is enormous and violent--more than 20 times the size of the average hurricane on Earth, with winds gusting at speeds four times what they would be on our planet. The hurricane appears to be fixed at Saturn's north pole, rather than drifting around the planet like hurricanes do here.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
It was an alien storm to dim memories of all others, wrapping all the way around a vast northern portion of Saturn, a planet that could hold about 750 Earths.  And it brought with it a spike in temperature never observed before anywhere in the solar system. Think of a violent storm, NASA said, that covers all of North America and continues on around the planet -- a storm from which you could not escape for nine months. Brigette Hesman, who tracks storms on Saturn, spoke with the Los Angeles Times on Thursday morning about the super storm and its aftermath, which have marked a peak in her scientific career.
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