Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSatyajit Ray
IN THE NEWS

Satyajit Ray

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2013 | By Peter Rainer
I once visited Monument Valley and tried to imagine myself in a John Ford western. It didn't work. I did the "Vertigo" tour in San Francisco and felt nothing. No matter how rooted in a specific time or place, most movies, especially the great ones, are essentially fantasias. If we should find ourselves checking out their actual locations, the effect can be deadening. Instead of being fellow spirits, we are merely tourists. These thoughts were in my mind when I traveled to Kolkata five years ago to discuss the legacy of the great Indian director Satyajit Ray as part of a cultural envoy program sponsored by the State Department.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2013 | By Peter Rainer
I once visited Monument Valley and tried to imagine myself in a John Ford western. It didn't work. I did the "Vertigo" tour in San Francisco and felt nothing. No matter how rooted in a specific time or place, most movies, especially the great ones, are essentially fantasias. If we should find ourselves checking out their actual locations, the effect can be deadening. Instead of being fellow spirits, we are merely tourists. These thoughts were in my mind when I traveled to Kolkata five years ago to discuss the legacy of the great Indian director Satyajit Ray as part of a cultural envoy program sponsored by the State Department.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Satyajit Ray, whose films of Bengali squalor introduced Indian cinema to the West much as Akira Kurosawa's "Rashomon" had done for Japan, died Thursday in Calcutta. Ray, whose stark portrayals of the desperately poor were appreciated around the world but not in his homeland, was 70. The son of an Indian family prominent in the arts, Ray three weeks ago won an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Susan King
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the American Cinematheque are celebrating the Academy Film Archive's restoration of 19 films directed by the seminal Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray (1921-92). On Sept. 6 at its Samuel Goldwyn Theatre, the academy is screening the first two installments of the filmmaker's landmark early work, "The Apu Trilogy": the award-winning 1955 “Pather Panchali,” a haunting drama about a young boy named Apu who lives with his poverty-stricken Brahmin family in rural Bengal; and 1956's “Aparajito, which continues the story of Apu and his family.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LACMA is presenting "Out of India: The Films of Satyajit Ray," a long-overdue retrospective, surely the most comprehensive presented locally, of the work of one of the major figures in world cinema. Ray was a Calcutta advertising agency art director and book illustrator whose life was transformed when he began creating drawings for the novel "Pather Panchali" (Song of the Open Road), an epic tale of the rural childhood and subsequent urban officer worker existence of Apu.
BOOKS
August 9, 1987 | Joseph Prabhu
Satyajit Ray is best known in the West as a celebrated Indian film maker whose mastery of the whole range of cinematography invariably evokes admiration. Here he reveals another facet of his protean talent--in a collection of stories originally written for a Bengali magazine that he has edited since 1961. While his films are generally realist in character, the stories tend toward the surreal and the fantastic.
NEWS
January 1, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The new year brings Satyajit Ray's great Apu trilogy to the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theater while the Hollywood Entertainment Museum will present a retrospective of the films of Sergei Paradjanov. Both presentations will feature documentaries that will serve as fine introductions to these two major directors. Priyanka Kumar's "The Song of the Little Road" (Friday at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Satyajit Ray's "Distant Thunder," which opens the city's "multicultural" films-on-video series tonight, was inspired by the Indian famine that killed millions during the later years of World War II. The film informs us that as combat escalated, rice eventually became as rare as gold dust. Made in 1973, and based on Bibhutibhusan Banerjee's 1946 novel of the same name, "Distant Thunder" begins with a romantic appreciation of military might.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a great deal of the late Satyajit Ray, India's foremost filmmaker, in his son Sandip: wit, charm, good looks, impeccable manners. But there's also a more important quality: the clear sense you have that he's his own man. For more than 10 years, Sandip Ray, 41, has been a successful director, and Filmhaus will release "The Broken Journey," his third theatrical feature--and the first to receive U.S. distribution--Wednesday at the Monica 4-Plex.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1995 | Peter Rainer, Peter Rainer is a Times staff writer
Satyajit Ray, who died at the age of 70 in 1992, was perhaps the most complexly sensual and transcendent film artist who ever lived. He made more than 30 features, as well as several shorts and documentaries, in a career that began in India in 1955 with "Pather Panchali"--the first movie in his famous "Apu Trilogy," one of the most acclaimed film works of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The son of the late Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray is making a movie marking 40 years since the creation of one of his father's most famous characters, a detective named Feluda. Ray, who won an honorary Academy Award in 1991 and died in 1992, wrote some 35 stories about Feluda, beginning in 1966. Ray's son, Sandip, told the Times of India his new film is based on one called "Tintoretto's Jesus."
NEWS
January 1, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The new year brings Satyajit Ray's great Apu trilogy to the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theater while the Hollywood Entertainment Museum will present a retrospective of the films of Sergei Paradjanov. Both presentations will feature documentaries that will serve as fine introductions to these two major directors. Priyanka Kumar's "The Song of the Little Road" (Friday at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2003 | Kevin Thomas
The new year brings Satyajit Ray's great "Apu Trilogy" to the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre along with a new documentary that serves as a fine introduction to one of world cinema's major directors. Priyanka Kumar's "The Song of the Little Road" (Friday at 7:30 p.m.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LACMA is presenting "Out of India: The Films of Satyajit Ray," a long-overdue retrospective, surely the most comprehensive presented locally, of the work of one of the major figures in world cinema. Ray was a Calcutta advertising agency art director and book illustrator whose life was transformed when he began creating drawings for the novel "Pather Panchali" (Song of the Open Road), an epic tale of the rural childhood and subsequent urban officer worker existence of Apu.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When India's great filmmaker Satyajit Ray was stricken with heart disease, he became all too aware that only the rich could afford good medical care for even the simplest treatments. As he recuperated, he determined to address this problem and commenced writing a script, "The Broken Journey," that he believed would be "his best and most important film yet."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a great deal of the late Satyajit Ray, India's foremost filmmaker, in his son Sandip: wit, charm, good looks, impeccable manners. But there's also a more important quality: the clear sense you have that he's his own man. For more than 10 years, Sandip Ray, 41, has been a successful director, and Filmhaus will release "The Broken Journey," his third theatrical feature--and the first to receive U.S. distribution--Wednesday at the Monica 4-Plex.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Indian film maker Satyajit Ray underwent heart surgery Wednesday in Calcutta and was fitted with a pacemaker. Hospital sources said the 68-year-old director was recovering well and would be moved out of intensive care in about two days. Ray, best known in the West for his depiction of corruption and life in village India, was to have gone to the Cannes Film Festival this week for the launch of his latest work, "An Enemy of the People."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The son of the late Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray is making a movie marking 40 years since the creation of one of his father's most famous characters, a detective named Feluda. Ray, who won an honorary Academy Award in 1991 and died in 1992, wrote some 35 stories about Feluda, beginning in 1966. Ray's son, Sandip, told the Times of India his new film is based on one called "Tintoretto's Jesus."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Agantuk"--translated as "The Stranger"--is the great Indian director Satyajit Ray's final film, and it's wonderful. Completed in 1992, shortly before Ray's death, it has been exhibited in this country until now primarily at film festivals. The commercial success of the recent Ray retrospective in L.A. no doubt had something to do with its belated local release.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1995 | Peter Rainer, Peter Rainer is a Times staff writer
Satyajit Ray, who died at the age of 70 in 1992, was perhaps the most complexly sensual and transcendent film artist who ever lived. He made more than 30 features, as well as several shorts and documentaries, in a career that began in India in 1955 with "Pather Panchali"--the first movie in his famous "Apu Trilogy," one of the most acclaimed film works of all time.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|