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SPORTS
November 11, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Officials in all sports are supposed to ensure fairness and, to a lesser degree, sportsmanship in the games they oversee. But one Saudi Arabian soccer referee apparently didn't get the memo. Early in the second half of Thursday's match between Al Nahdha and Al Ittihad, Taisir Al Antaif, the goalkeeper for Al Nahdha, paused before a goal kick when he noticed the shoelace on his left boot had come undone. Because he was wearing his large white goalie gloves, Al Antaif was unable to rectify the situation himself so he began gesturing to teammates to come help him out. Instead Brazilian striker Jobson of visiting Al Ittihad rushed over.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - Middle East Respiratory Syndrome has come to Egypt. State television said Saturday that the country's first case had been discovered. It said the patient, who was hospitalized in Cairo, had recently traveled to Saudi Arabia, where the virus was first identified. Saudi Arabia had announced hours earlier that the death toll in the kingdom had reached 92. In addition, an Indonesian man who had traveled to Saudi Arabia died Friday after returning home, and the virus has been found elsewhere in the Middle East, including Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.
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NATIONAL
February 24, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
The FBI has arrested a young Saudi citizen in Texas who was allegedly amassing bomb components for a string of attacks on a dozen hydroelectric and reservoir dams in California and Colorado and former President George W. Bush's home in Dallas, which he disparaged as the "tyrant's house. " Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari, who attended a community college near Lubbock, Texas, and allegedly kept a detailed journal outlining plans for attacks, was charged with attempting to build and use a weapon of mass destruction.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - With the appearance of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, in the Arab world's most populous country, health officials face a tough new challenge in confronting the often lethal virus. Egypt's Ministry of Health said Saturday that the country's first case had been discovered, identifying the patient as a 27-year-old Egyptian man who had been living and working in Saudi Arabia's capital, Riyadh. He was placed in quarantine at a Cairo hospital immediately upon his return.
OPINION
July 31, 2003
Re "Read Between the Lines of Those 28 Missing Pages," by Robert Scheer, Commentary, July 29: Nothing would destabilize the Mideast region more than an attempt to overthrow the Saudi government. "Regime change" in the desert kingdom would play into the hands of Al Qaeda terrorists. Scheer's belief that President Bush's "business ties" with the oil-rich kingdom are behind the effort to classify information about its links to the 9/11 hijackers misses the point. No group would be happier to see the current government go than Al Qaeda itself, which has conducted operations and established cells in Riyadh and Mecca.
WORLD
September 16, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
Driving through the desert night, Mohammed Khalif skids left and pulls up at an apartment with walls the color of pink grapefruit. Young men sit on a couch, reveling in the intricacy of Stanley Kubrick and chiding the sentimentality of Steven Spielberg. A debate ensues over genius. The usual suspects are trotted out: Italian neo-realism, the French New Wave. A Spielberg defender blurts: "You wouldn't even be here if it weren't for Spielberg. Look what he's done." A brief pause.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | From Reuters
The Lebanese capital's first fundamentalist department store offers "everything Islamic, at competitive prices." Customers have flocked eagerly to the Modern Commercial Market. The market opened just over a week ago in West Beirut. Goods for sale include Egyptian and Saudi video cassettes and long-sleeved, ankle-length Islamic women's gowns, sold in a wide range of patterns and cuts to satisfy the Lebanese flair for elegance.
OPINION
March 24, 2002
Re "Saudi Editor Retracts Article That Defamed Jews," March 20: The Times is to be complimented for the coverage of the recent revival of the old, anti-Semitic blood libel issue. That such a report could still appear in Al Riyadh, a newspaper controlled by the Saudi government, in 2002 shows how deep is the hatred of non-Muslims (specifically Jews and Christians). Egyptian editor Adel Hammouda's remark that there is nothing governments can do to stop the spread and expression of anti-Semitic feelings is ridiculous.
NEWS
January 31, 1991
The U.S. military command said two U.S. soldiers, a man and a woman, apparently were missing. The two were not directly involved in the fighting at the northern Saudi port of Khafji, the military said. It was the first report of a woman soldier missing in the war. Iraq, meanwhile, said its forces had captured Americans, including women.
NEWS
September 4, 1987
The Energy Department paid $70 million to creditors of an alcohol fuels plant in Louisiana owned by one of the bankrupt companies of Saudi arms dealer Adnan Khashoggi, the Washington Post reported. The payment, made two weeks ago without public comment to creditors of the Agrifuels Refining Co., comes from the Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Reserve Fund, the Post reported. The fund was set up in 1980 by Congress when it created the alcohol fuels program.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Eleven new cases of the occasionally fatal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, were reported in Saudi Arabia on Wednesday, two days after the nation's health minister was replaced. In the week ending Monday, 67 cases were reported of the SARS-like virus. One patient died in Riyadh on Monday, the same day that King Abdullah replaced minister Abdullah Rabeeah. Saudi official news outlets reported no specific reason for the ouster. Since the outbreak began in 2012, 272 people have been infected in the oil-rich kingdom, with 81 of them dying.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Prince Bandar bin Sultan's replacement last week as Saudi Arabia's intelligence chief has fueled speculation about a shift in the monarchy's shaky relations with the United States and its position toward the Syrian conflict - not to mention about the prince's political future. Yet many political experts and pundits believe Bandar's departure will barely affect Saudi foreign policies. And they say it's possible the prince could return to the political scene stronger than ever. “The last person to be relieved of his duties [in 2012]
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- President Obama jetted across the Mediterranean Sea on Friday on a diplomatic mission to try to bridge the gaps between the U.S. and its longtime ally, Saudi Arabia. Obama landed in the capital, arriving from Rome where he capped off the European stretch of his week-long trip overseas. The president was greeted by Prince Khalid bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, the governor of Riyadh, and a line of Saudi soldiers before boarding a helicopter bound for a desert camp, the setting for a meeting with the ailing King Abdullah and dinner with the royal family.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - President Obama spoke with Russian President Vladimir Putin for an hour Friday in an effort to resolve the crisis over Ukraine, the first direct conversation between the two leaders after nearly two weeks of tension. Putin initiated the call, White House officials said. It came after a televised interview in which Obama called for Russia to pull its troops back from the Ukrainian border. In the phone conversation, Obama asked Putin to "put a concrete response in writing" to a proposal the United States has made to resolve the crisis, which involved Russia's incursion into the Crimean region of Ukraine.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, Kathleen Hennessey and Laura King
ROME - After spending four days in Europe dealing with the crisis over Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama now turns to a diplomatic challenge of another sort: trying to smooth relations with Saudi Arabia without making the longtime U.S. ally seem like an afterthought. Obama is scheduled to arrive in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, shortly before sunset Friday to meet with King Abdullah, whose inner circle is riled by how the United States has handled Iran's nuclear ambitions and Syria's civil war. Some with close ties to the royal family have talked about breaking ranks with Western partners.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -   The White House said it is “very disappointed” by Saudi Arabia's decision to deny a visa to a White House reporter for the Jerusalem Post who applied to cover President Obama's visit to that Middle East nation this week. The Kingdom did not offer an explanation for its decision to bar Michael Wilner, the paper's White House correspondent, from entering to cover two-day meeting  between Obama and King Abdullah, the Jerusalam Post reported. Senior White House officials lobbied unsuccessfully on behalf of Wilner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1990
I read the article about Saudi women being denied the right to drive (Part A, Nov. 15). It is amazing to me that we are sending 400,000-plus Americans to risk their lives in defense of people who have such prejudices. Your article discusses the Saudis' concerns about "contamination" by U.S. soldiers. I say, let them be contaminated by their Muslim brothers and sisters from Iraq. Bring our guys home now. CHRIS SHOCKMAN, Culver City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1987
The President's monkey business in the Persian Gulf offers a perfect opportunity for the Soviet Union to bleed the United States white by supplying Soviet weapons to Iran. Our forces on the far side of the planet are operating in the rattrap gulf with a strait only 12 miles wide on the southern doorstep of the USSR. All this for the benefit of a despotic Saudi king and a dozen equally despotic Arab sheiks, who won't grant the U.S. land bases for its aircraft and ships. And we are starting a war with Iran when Iran's enemy, Iraq, was responsible for the deaths of 38 American sailors.
OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Dennis Ross
President Obama will visit Saudi Arabia this week. Based on what I hear from key Saudis, he is in for a rough reception. Rarely have the Saudis been more skeptical about the United States, and if the president is to affect Saudi behavior, it is important for him to understand why. Fundamentally, the Saudis believe that America's friends and interests are under threat, and the U.S. response has ranged from indifference to accommodation. The Saudis see Iran trying to encircle them with its Quds Force active in Bahrain, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and their own eastern province.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Saudi Arabian Airline is scheduled to begin new service from Los Angeles International Airport to Saudi Arabia later this month, an occasion that is customarily celebrated with an elaborate ceremony on the tarmac and in the terminal. For example, when Emirates Airline debuted in December daily service between LAX and Dubai, the airlines taxied the A380 plane to the gate under a shower of water from the airport fire trucks' water cannons. But with California in its worst drought in modern times, LAX officials told Saudi Arabian Airline that they'll have to make do without the water cannons for the celebration of the new service.
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