Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSaudi Arabia
IN THE NEWS

Saudi Arabia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - Middle East Respiratory Syndrome has come to Egypt. State television said Saturday that the country's first case had been discovered. It said the patient, who was hospitalized in Cairo, had recently traveled to Saudi Arabia, where the virus was first identified. Saudi Arabia had announced hours earlier that the death toll in the kingdom had reached 92. In addition, an Indonesian man who had traveled to Saudi Arabia died Friday after returning home, and the virus has been found elsewhere in the Middle East, including Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.
Advertisement
WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Saudi Arabia denied reports that a young man had been sentenced to paralysis, a punishment that human rights groups had excoriated as a form of torture. “This is untrue,” the Justice Ministry said Monday on its Twitter account, according to a translation by blogger Ahmed Omran . The judge “dismissed the request of such punishment.” The Saudi Gazette reported last month that if Ali Khawahir could not pay roughly $270,000 to the friend he allegedly stabbed and paralyzed a decade ago, he in turn would be paralyzed.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - With the appearance of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, in the Arab world's most populous country, health officials face a tough new challenge in confronting the often lethal virus. Egypt's Ministry of Health said Saturday that the country's first case had been discovered, identifying the patient as a 27-year-old Egyptian man who had been living and working in Saudi Arabia's capital, Riyadh. He was placed in quarantine at a Cairo hospital immediately upon his return.
OPINION
December 24, 1995
I am writing to take exception to "Experts Ask: Did Saudi Crackdown Light Fuse of Bomb?" (Nov. 14), about the car bombing that killed five Americans in Saudi Arabia. At this point, we do not yet know the identity or nationality of the terrorist who committed this horrible act. Yet Robin Wright wrote that "the eruption of violence in Saudi Arabia was almost predictable." On what basis did she link the bombing with this kind of blanket statement? The internal situation that Wright described--which is not accurate--did not cause this car bombing any more than the U.S. budget crisis caused the Oklahoma City bombing.
WORLD
June 5, 2011 | By Iona Craig and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Yemen's embattled president left the country for treatment of injuries suffered in a rocket attack, a dramatic turn after two weeks of heavy fighting that signaled a drive by Saudi Arabia to quell the chaos on its southern border and could result in a change of leadership. A source close to the Saudi government said President Ali Abdullah Saleh arrived late Saturday in Saudi Arabia for treatment. Yemeni officials also confirmed that the Saudis had brokered a truce in the fighting that has racked the capital.
WORLD
January 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Saudi Arabia on Wednesday beheaded a Sri Lankan woman who was convicted of killing a baby, putting the former domestic worker to death despite her young age at the time of the alleged crime. The Sri Lankan government had pleaded with Saudi officials to spare Rizana Nafeek, who was 17 and had been working in the country just a few weeks when a baby died in her care in 2005. She was among the hundreds of thousands of migrants who flock to Saudi Arabia from countries such as Sri Lanka, Indonesia and the Philippines, toiling as domestic workers who cook, clean and care for children.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -   The White House said it is “very disappointed” by Saudi Arabia's decision to deny a visa to a White House reporter for the Jerusalem Post who applied to cover President Obama's visit to that Middle East nation this week. The Kingdom did not offer an explanation for its decision to bar Michael Wilner, the paper's White House correspondent, from entering to cover two-day meeting  between Obama and King Abdullah, the Jerusalam Post reported. Senior White House officials lobbied unsuccessfully on behalf of Wilner.
WORLD
April 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Alarmed by reports that Saudi Arabia will paralyze a man as punishment for allegedly stabbing a friend who ended up paralyzed, Britain urged the kingdom Thursday to abandon the “grotesque punishment.” The Saudi Gazette reported last week that Ali Khawahir was sentenced to be paralyzed if he could not pay 1 million riyals - roughly $270,000 - to the friend he allegedly stabbed a decade ago. Khawahir was reportedly 14 years old when he...
WORLD
March 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - The Saudi royal family prizes stability as much as the oil that secures its wealth, but political upheaval across the Middle East has shaken the kingdom's sense of balance, forcing it to press for radical change in Syria and confront a bid by longtime nemesis Iran to wield greater influence. The decades-old rivalry between Sunni Muslim Saudi Arabia and Shiite-controlled Iran for prominence in the region is one of the volatile subplots embedded in the "Arab Spring.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Eleven new cases of the occasionally fatal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, were reported in Saudi Arabia on Wednesday, two days after the nation's health minister was replaced. In the week ending Monday, 67 cases were reported of the SARS-like virus. One patient died in Riyadh on Monday, the same day that King Abdullah replaced minister Abdullah Rabeeah. Saudi official news outlets reported no specific reason for the ouster. Since the outbreak began in 2012, 272 people have been infected in the oil-rich kingdom, with 81 of them dying.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Prince Bandar bin Sultan's replacement last week as Saudi Arabia's intelligence chief has fueled speculation about a shift in the monarchy's shaky relations with the United States and its position toward the Syrian conflict - not to mention about the prince's political future. Yet many political experts and pundits believe Bandar's departure will barely affect Saudi foreign policies. And they say it's possible the prince could return to the political scene stronger than ever. “The last person to be relieved of his duties [in 2012]
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- President Obama jetted across the Mediterranean Sea on Friday on a diplomatic mission to try to bridge the gaps between the U.S. and its longtime ally, Saudi Arabia. Obama landed in the capital, arriving from Rome where he capped off the European stretch of his week-long trip overseas. The president was greeted by Prince Khalid bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, the governor of Riyadh, and a line of Saudi soldiers before boarding a helicopter bound for a desert camp, the setting for a meeting with the ailing King Abdullah and dinner with the royal family.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- President Obama said Russia should move its troops back from its border with Ukraine and ease tensions by opening direct negotiations with that country's new government. The Russian troops massing near the border are doing so “under the guise of military exercises,” Obama said in a television interview that aired Friday. But those exercises “are not what Russia would normally be doing,” Obama told "CBS Evening News" anchor Scott Pelley. “And, you know, it may simply be an effort to intimidate Ukraine or it may be that they've got additional plans.” If Russian President Vladimir Putin wants to ease the situation, Obama said, Kremlin officials need “to move back those troops and to begin negotiations directly with the Ukrainian government as well as the international community.” The remarks aired as Obama made his way to Saudi Arabia on a mission to smooth relations with the longtime U.S. ally, recently dismayed by Washington's policy in Syria, Iran and Egypt.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - President Obama spoke with Russian President Vladimir Putin for an hour Friday in an effort to resolve the crisis over Ukraine, the first direct conversation between the two leaders after nearly two weeks of tension. Putin initiated the call, White House officials said. It came after a televised interview in which Obama called for Russia to pull its troops back from the Ukrainian border. In the phone conversation, Obama asked Putin to "put a concrete response in writing" to a proposal the United States has made to resolve the crisis, which involved Russia's incursion into the Crimean region of Ukraine.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, Kathleen Hennessey and Laura King
ROME - After spending four days in Europe dealing with the crisis over Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama now turns to a diplomatic challenge of another sort: trying to smooth relations with Saudi Arabia without making the longtime U.S. ally seem like an afterthought. Obama is scheduled to arrive in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, shortly before sunset Friday to meet with King Abdullah, whose inner circle is riled by how the United States has handled Iran's nuclear ambitions and Syria's civil war. Some with close ties to the royal family have talked about breaking ranks with Western partners.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -   The White House said it is “very disappointed” by Saudi Arabia's decision to deny a visa to a White House reporter for the Jerusalem Post who applied to cover President Obama's visit to that Middle East nation this week. The Kingdom did not offer an explanation for its decision to bar Michael Wilner, the paper's White House correspondent, from entering to cover two-day meeting  between Obama and King Abdullah, the Jerusalam Post reported. Senior White House officials lobbied unsuccessfully on behalf of Wilner.
OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Dennis Ross
President Obama will visit Saudi Arabia this week. Based on what I hear from key Saudis, he is in for a rough reception. Rarely have the Saudis been more skeptical about the United States, and if the president is to affect Saudi behavior, it is important for him to understand why. Fundamentally, the Saudis believe that America's friends and interests are under threat, and the U.S. response has ranged from indifference to accommodation. The Saudis see Iran trying to encircle them with its Quds Force active in Bahrain, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and their own eastern province.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|