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Saudi Arabia Agriculture

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BUSINESS
July 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudi Arabian Wheat Output Expected to Drop: Economists in the kingdom say the fall in the price of oil and a new atmosphere of austerity could reduce output of the wheat crop by half in the next few years. Some see Saudi Arabia eventually importing wheat again to meet rising demand, although others say the government sets too high a priority on self-sufficiency for that.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudi Arabian Wheat Output Expected to Drop: Economists in the kingdom say the fall in the price of oil and a new atmosphere of austerity could reduce output of the wheat crop by half in the next few years. Some see Saudi Arabia eventually importing wheat again to meet rising demand, although others say the government sets too high a priority on self-sufficiency for that.
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NEWS
January 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fears of a major oil spill in the Persian Gulf go beyond environmental damage or military obstacles--to the availability of life-sustaining fresh water. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and smaller gulf nations are highly dependent on a handful of immense desalination plants, both for drinking water and agriculture. Most of these plants take seawater directly from the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fears of a major oil spill in the Persian Gulf go beyond environmental damage or military obstacles--to the availability of life-sustaining fresh water. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and smaller gulf nations are highly dependent on a handful of immense desalination plants, both for drinking water and agriculture. Most of these plants take seawater directly from the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | NEIL MacFARQUHAR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Farmers are trying to make the desert bloom, but their main harvest since the Gulf War has been unexploded cluster bomblets dropped by allied pilots on farms the Iraqis had turned into military camps. "The bomb squad shows up once a week to clear away mines and bombs," said Ronald Roosenbloom, a 38-year-old Dutchman. He is the only European farm manager left in the Wafra region, which has 800 agricultural operations, most of them truck or poultry farms.
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