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BUSINESS
June 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
McDonald's inadvertently offended thousands of Muslims by printing a Koran scripture on its hamburger bags, then staged a retreat Tuesday after Islamic leaders complained. The stir caused by the world's leading purveyor of fast food began with a World Cup promotion featuring the flags of the 24 nations competing in this summer's soccer championship. One of the flags was that of Saudi Arabia.
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BUSINESS
January 8, 2001 | DONNA ABU-NASR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wednesday night in Riyadh's glitziest mall is special. The Islamic weekend is beginning, and young men in jeans or white robes and women swaddled in black cloaks throng its three floors, not to shop but to hook up--the Saudi way. With the religious police on hand to enforce a ban on mixing, the young people have to let their eyes do the talking. A date begins when a woman's look invites a man to discreetly throw a jotted-down cell phone number and e-mail address at her feet.
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NEWS
September 30, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kent Hinkson settled into the sofa in his parents' living room and glanced over at his two younger sons playing with Masters of the Universe figures on the floor. He clasped his hands under his chin as if in prayer. Then, calmly and evenly, he recounted the events that led to the death of his wife and daughter last month in Saudi Arabia. "It was a Tuesday, Aug. 14," he began.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her steamy native Georgia, this American woman's short-sleeved top would have been considered only sensible. On the streets of Dhahran, revealing her elbows was enough to provoke a scolding from one of the officially sanctioned religious policemen who watch for breaches of Saudi tradition. " 'You should cover your arms!' he told me. 'Does your husband know you are about like this?' " recalled the woman, the wife of an American businessman. "I thought: 'I'll never adjust to this place.'
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | Associated Press
American and British commanders Friday warned soldiers not to eat, drink or smoke in public during daylight when the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan begins Sunday. "Guests in the kingdom are expected to be aware of Ramadan, respect the feelings of fasting people and conduct themselves accordingly," said a memorandum issued to U.S. personnel by the Central Command in Riyadh.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With one hand on the carved crescent dagger at his waist and the other thrusting a finger at the sky, the elderly Bedouin soldier stood gravely before his prince. "Najran is with you," he announced, his finger tracing a solemn circle around the barren landscape. "The south is with you. All these points are behind you, from north to south . . . and Saddam Hussein is sinking in shame. He sold his neighbors for very cheap dreams."
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her steamy native Georgia, this American woman's short-sleeved top would have been considered only sensible. On the streets of Dhahran, revealing her elbows was enough to provoke a scolding from one of the officially sanctioned religious policemen who watch for breaches of Saudi tradition. " 'You should cover your arms!' he told me. 'Does your husband know you are about like this?' " recalled the woman, the wife of an American businessman. "I thought: 'I'll never adjust to this place.'
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
First came several Kuwaiti refugees, expressing gratitude for the Saudi government's hospitality. Next came a man involved in a land dispute. Then a man seeking help in finding medical treatment. Another came to offer a poem. Prince Muhammed ibn Abdulaziz, the son of King Fahd and governor of Arabia's oil-rich Eastern Province, had time for each of them.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ford Mustang paused at the corner, as if to catch its breath, then plunged forward, wheels screeching, toward the crowd. Three dozen onlookers dived for the sidewalk, but the Mustang swerved and spun crazily down the highway, then skidded to a stop. A red Mercedes at full speed roared past just inches from its bumper, and the Mustang's driver bent back over the wheel and hit the accelerator again, his red head scarf flapping out the window.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lobby of the Marriott Hotel here calls to mind the rollicking bar of the movie "Star Wars," an unlikely menage of intergalactic travelers brought together at some distant outpost for a cup of cheer. Amid gleaming glass elevators, roving bellhops and potted plants, dozens of Kuwaiti refugees call helplessly after errant toddlers. Saudi businessmen in flowing white robes and headdresses bend in intense conversation over cups of tea.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
McDonald's inadvertently offended thousands of Muslims by printing a Koran scripture on its hamburger bags, then staged a retreat Tuesday after Islamic leaders complained. The stir caused by the world's leading purveyor of fast food began with a World Cup promotion featuring the flags of the 24 nations competing in this summer's soccer championship. One of the flags was that of Saudi Arabia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What had been planned as a low-key cultural introduction to the Arab states along the Persian Gulf took on a new dimension with Iraq's invasion of Kuwait. Suad S. Ammar, principal librarian for the Placentia Library District, started planning "Gulf Arab States: Beyond Camels, Oil and the Sand Dunes" months before the invasion on Aug. 2, 1990, that eventually led to war. "It was just a coincidence that we targeted an area where the problem took place," Ammar said recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of Paul Nance's neighbors in this western Missouri town of 392 grow wheat, alfalfa, hay or other crops over acre after acre of softly rolling hills. Nance, a white-haired, 66-year-old with a piercing stare and a gentle laugh, has some grains planted on his 120-acre spread, but his farm's raison d'etre is the cultivation of something else entirely: better understanding of the Arab world.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When thousands of American and other foreign troops began arriving in Saudi Arabia a year ago, many journalists and Middle East specialists predicted that the conservative desert kingdom would never be the same again. Some even warned of "Bangkok-ization" of the Muslim Holy Land, home of the sacred cities of Mecca and Medina.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Saudi Arabia, the country that called forth the greatest military effort since World War II, is enjoying a business boom. Companies of all shapes and sizes, from the United States and around the world, are here examining opportunities for joint ventures with the Saudi government or private companies. And the opportunities are not just in oil and gas but in agriculture, manufacturing and services.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost five months after their bold crime, the women who dared to drive are still jobless and trapped in a country where they have suffered scorn and ridicule. By driving a convoy of cars through the streets of Riyadh on Nov. 6, at a time when a world on the brink of war focused attention on Saudi Arabia, 49 Saudi women violated longstanding Islamic tradition to press demands for a limited agenda of equal rights and opportunity.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the 10th day of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan in 1973, but Egyptian President Anwar Sadat already had decreed that his soldiers would be exempt from the fast as they prepared to launch a daring drive across the Suez Canal into the Sinai Desert. The president was more than a little discomfited when he strode into the operations room before the first strike and found his senior commanders fasting. The operation, he sternly warned, needed their full concentration.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family portraits hang in two rows on the living room wall, just above the sofa. There is Wahid Ishgi's, looking stern and fatherly, and his wife's, with her dangling earrings and irrepressible smile. Below those are school photographs of the girls. Well, most of the girls. Sixteen-year-old Meme ordered hers removed last year, lest an uncle or a cousin enter the house and see her face unveiled.
NEWS
March 29, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An airman steals drugs from a flight surgeon. A Marine shoots himself in the leg to avoid duty. A sergeant falls asleep at his guard post. In the seven months since half a million U.S. troops were dispatched to Saudi Arabia, more than 3,500 American service personnel have been punished for a wide range of offenses--from minor infractions, such as showing disrespect, to more serious crimes such as negligent homicide. The numbers are preliminary and expected to grow.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | Associated Press
American and British commanders Friday warned soldiers not to eat, drink or smoke in public during daylight when the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan begins Sunday. "Guests in the kingdom are expected to be aware of Ramadan, respect the feelings of fasting people and conduct themselves accordingly," said a memorandum issued to U.S. personnel by the Central Command in Riyadh.
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