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Saudi Arabia Foreign Investments

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BUSINESS
August 15, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As Americans watch U.S. warships, planes and troops in the Middle East, one of the most interesting questions they can ask about the troubled region is "where did all the money go?" Over the last six decades, oil has brought billions to the region. And still the area is unsettled and Iraqi ruler Saddam Hussein can strike a responsive chord with rhetoric about the rich Arab kingdoms and the poor Arab masses--and that's despite the fact that Iraq itself is oil rich.
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BUSINESS
June 9, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, Editor's note: James Flanigan is on special assignment in the Middle East to assess that region's economic future in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War
The old Ministry of Petroleum building, once Saudi Arabia's most powerful edifice after the Royal Palace, resembles a desert stronghold, with narrow windows set in its thick sandstone and cement walls. It now stands empty. The new Ministry of Petroleum building, by contrast, is a dark crystal fountain, all marble and blue-black glass arching out of the earth. It is sleekly modern, airy and outward looking. Each building reflects its time.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Saudi Arabia, the country that called forth the greatest military effort since World War II, is enjoying a business boom. Companies of all shapes and sizes, from the United States and around the world, are here examining opportunities for joint ventures with the Saudi government or private companies. And the opportunities are not just in oil and gas but in agriculture, manufacturing and services.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Saudi Arabia, the country that called forth the greatest military effort since World War II, is enjoying a business boom. Companies of all shapes and sizes, from the United States and around the world, are here examining opportunities for joint ventures with the Saudi government or private companies. And the opportunities are not just in oil and gas but in agriculture, manufacturing and services.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, Editor's note: James Flanigan is on special assignment in the Middle East to assess that region's economic future in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War
The old Ministry of Petroleum building, once Saudi Arabia's most powerful edifice after the Royal Palace, resembles a desert stronghold, with narrow windows set in its thick sandstone and cement walls. It now stands empty. The new Ministry of Petroleum building, by contrast, is a dark crystal fountain, all marble and blue-black glass arching out of the earth. It is sleekly modern, airy and outward looking. Each building reflects its time.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As Americans watch U.S. warships, planes and troops in the Middle East, one of the most interesting questions they can ask about the troubled region is "where did all the money go?" Over the last six decades, oil has brought billions to the region. And still the area is unsettled and Iraqi ruler Saddam Hussein can strike a responsive chord with rhetoric about the rich Arab kingdoms and the poor Arab masses--and that's despite the fact that Iraq itself is oil rich.
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