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Saudi Arabia Foreign Policy

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NEWS
September 7, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Saudi Arabia, in a dramatic demonstration of how the Persian Gulf crisis has transformed the Middle East, is on the verge of re-establishing formal diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union after a break of more than 50 years, informed sources told The Times on Thursday. Senior U.S. government officials said the Saudis may even consider providing financial help for the Soviets' crippled economy.
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NEWS
May 11, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a turnabout that could improve prospects for an eventual settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict, Saudi Arabia and five other moderate Arab nations have agreed to take part in a Middle East peace conference, a Saudi diplomatic source said Friday. The agreement by the members of the Gulf Cooperation Council is expected to be announced today in Luxembourg and is timed to coincide with a new Middle East diplomatic tour begun Friday night by Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
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NEWS
August 4, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia, the petroleum powerhouse that for years has dominated policy-making within the Middle East, suddenly may have to answer to Iraq in everything from oil pricing and production policies to foreign relations--with or without any new military aggression by the Iraqis, regional experts fear.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The no-questions-asked days of Saudi Arabia's checkbook diplomacy are fast coming to an end. Dismayed that some of the world's top recipients of Saudi aid sided with Iraq during the Persian Gulf War, kingdom officials have reversed one of this nation's longstanding policies: From now on, Saudi Arabia will be more selective about the millions of dollars it regularly dishes out to other countries and causes.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prominent Saudi Arabian businessman recently brought some art books home from the United States and was held up at customs. What, the customs officer wanted to know, are these two naked women doing on the pages of one of the books? "It's Rubens," the businessman explained. "It's art." When that failed, he offered to let the customs officer black out the offending paintings. This was considered and dismissed.
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Fahd of Saudi Arabia agreed Friday to take an active role in support of Bush Administration efforts toward peace in the Middle East, U.S. officials said, but offered no specific commitments for Saudi action. "They made it clear that they want to work closely with us," a senior official said of the Saudis, briefing reporters after Secretary of State James A. Baker III met with Fahd for 2 1/2 hours at the king's opulent Yamama Palace. He said Baker outlined to the king the planned U.S.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The no-questions-asked days of Saudi Arabia's checkbook diplomacy are fast coming to an end. Dismayed that some of the world's top recipients of Saudi aid sided with Iraq during the Persian Gulf War, kingdom officials have reversed one of this nation's longstanding policies: From now on, Saudi Arabia will be more selective about the millions of dollars it regularly dishes out to other countries and causes.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a turnabout that could improve prospects for an eventual settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict, Saudi Arabia and five other moderate Arab nations have agreed to take part in a Middle East peace conference, a Saudi diplomatic source said Friday. The agreement by the members of the Gulf Cooperation Council is expected to be announced today in Luxembourg and is timed to coincide with a new Middle East diplomatic tour begun Friday night by Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER and Michael Ross of The Times' Washington Bureau is a member of the Pentagon press pool currently in Saudi Arabia. This report was written for the pool, whose members are not allowed to disclose their exact location. and
Nowhere does history seem to repeat itself more quickly than it does in the turbulent Middle East. Just over three years ago, the skittish sheikdoms of the Persian Gulf watched with a concern that bordered on alarm as U.S. naval forces converged on this part of the world to protect Kuwaiti oil tankers and safeguard the shipping lanes then being menaced by Iran. The fear then was that the U.S.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2004 | Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
The chairman and another member of the Sept. 11 commission said Sunday that Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, two key U.S. allies in the war on terrorism, had turned a blind eye to Al Qaeda operations and operatives in their countries for years before the terrorist group struck the United States in 2001. Republican commissioner John F. Lehman said on the NBC program "Meet the Press" that Pakistan and Saudi Arabia had before Sept.
NEWS
March 9, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Fahd of Saudi Arabia agreed Friday to take an active role in support of Bush Administration efforts toward peace in the Middle East, U.S. officials said, but offered no specific commitments for Saudi action. "They made it clear that they want to work closely with us," a senior official said of the Saudis, briefing reporters after Secretary of State James A. Baker III met with Fahd for 2 1/2 hours at the king's opulent Yamama Palace. He said Baker outlined to the king the planned U.S.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Saudi Arabia, in a dramatic demonstration of how the Persian Gulf crisis has transformed the Middle East, is on the verge of re-establishing formal diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union after a break of more than 50 years, informed sources told The Times on Thursday. Senior U.S. government officials said the Saudis may even consider providing financial help for the Soviets' crippled economy.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER and Michael Ross of The Times' Washington Bureau is a member of the Pentagon press pool currently in Saudi Arabia. This report was written for the pool, whose members are not allowed to disclose their exact location. and
Nowhere does history seem to repeat itself more quickly than it does in the turbulent Middle East. Just over three years ago, the skittish sheikdoms of the Persian Gulf watched with a concern that bordered on alarm as U.S. naval forces converged on this part of the world to protect Kuwaiti oil tankers and safeguard the shipping lanes then being menaced by Iran. The fear then was that the U.S.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prominent Saudi Arabian businessman recently brought some art books home from the United States and was held up at customs. What, the customs officer wanted to know, are these two naked women doing on the pages of one of the books? "It's Rubens," the businessman explained. "It's art." When that failed, he offered to let the customs officer black out the offending paintings. This was considered and dismissed.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia, the petroleum powerhouse that for years has dominated policy-making within the Middle East, suddenly may have to answer to Iraq in everything from oil pricing and production policies to foreign relations--with or without any new military aggression by the Iraqis, regional experts fear.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2004 | Lisa Getter, Times Staff Writer
When the government of El Salvador wanted help extending immigration benefits to its citizens in the U.S., it turned to a new lobbying shop set up by Miami lawyer Alberto Cardenas Jr., a star of the Republican fundraising machine. The lobbyists were confident that "a round of consultations and meetings" with Bush administration officials would get El Salvador what it wanted: an additional 18 months of protection and work permits for Salvadorans living in the U.S.
WORLD
October 7, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing beside the ice skating rink at the center of the largest indoor shopping mall in the Persian Gulf region, Yousuf Haidar proudly explains what he sees happening around him. "Qatar is joining the modern age," said Haidar, 40, a furniture store manager on a shopping spree with his family. "The world is finally learning about Qatar." If the U.S.
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