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OPINION
February 14, 2005
Re "Saudis Gingerly Experiment With Democracy," Feb. 10: As we prompt and often demand that other nations embrace our form of democracy, it might be prudent to briefly review the journey that began with our birth as a sovereign nation in 1789. In 1789, white men with property were the only voters. By 1828 (39 years later), all white men could vote. By 1865 (76 years later), slavery was dumped. By 1870 (81 years later), all men, except Native Americans, could vote. By 1920 (131 years later)
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OPINION
February 14, 2005
Re "Saudis Gingerly Experiment With Democracy," Feb. 10: As we prompt and often demand that other nations embrace our form of democracy, it might be prudent to briefly review the journey that began with our birth as a sovereign nation in 1789. In 1789, white men with property were the only voters. By 1828 (39 years later), all white men could vote. By 1865 (76 years later), slavery was dumped. By 1870 (81 years later), all men, except Native Americans, could vote. By 1920 (131 years later)
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NEWS
July 6, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Bandar ibn Sultan, ambassador to the United States, son of the defense minister, nephew of kings and grandson of the great Abdulaziz ibn Saud--who by his wiles and steel unified the warring tribes to create Saudi Arabia--twirled a huge cigar as he rode in his private Boeing 707 and explained why his country is unfazed by Islamic extremists, despite two recent bombings. Look at Egypt, he said. There, the secular government and the extremists are far apart on matters of religion.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Saudi authorities have blocked access to a site on U.S. Internet giant Yahoo Inc.'s Web portal that contains pornographic and other offensive material, a Saudi official said Sunday. "The decision to block the clubs.yahoo.com site is irreversible. Matters have gone beyond what is acceptable, and pornographic and other offensive sites are mushrooming," said Khalil al-Jadaan, an official with the King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology, the kingdom's sole Internet provider.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young prince likes to play gourmet cook. When it comes time to sit down to dinner, though, the meal is served by not one but three Philippine maids. His guests are fetched by Pakistani drivers--one for home, a few more for the office. Now, he frowns because the Saudi government has held up his request for visas to import more foreign help. "I've been waiting two months for visas, and I'm a nephew of the king!" he exclaims.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The way Scott Nelson sees it, it was bad enough for Saudi Arabian police to beat him on the soles of his feet and break his knees while trying to get him to confess to charges they never even explained. But for the U.S. government to side with the torturers in court, that was too much. "When you come back to this country and your own government turns its back on you, the torture continues," said Nelson, a technician from Raleigh, N.C. Nelson is trying to sue the Saudi government for damages.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Army forces began building a processing center here Friday to dispatch the first of an estimated 8,000 Iraqi refugees to Saudi Arabia, which has agreed to grant them asylum in a large new camp on the Saudi-Iraqi border. The first 500 refugees are scheduled to leave southern Iraq on Sunday. This week, Iran also began accepting the first of about 2,000 Iraqi refugees with family or religious ties to Iran.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Saudi government expelled the Afghan charge d'affaires Tuesday and recalled its representative from Kabul, the official news agency reported. The Afghan envoy was ordered to leave "due to Saudi Arabia's national interests," the Saudi Press Agency said. Saudi Arabia is one of three countries that has recognized the Taliban religious militia as the legitimate government in war-racked Afghanistan. The others are Pakistan and the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. authorities expressed optimism Tuesday that a Saudi dissident deported to the U.S. will now provide crucial leads about the perpetrators of last June's terrorist bombing in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 American service personnel. The suspect, Hani Abdel Rahim Hussein Sayegh, was sent from Canada on Tuesday in time for a federal court hearing today, according to Michael Wildes, his U.S. lawyer. After weeks of on-again, off-again negotiations with U.S.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Signaling a return to normal duties, King Fahd presided over a Cabinet meeting for the first time since suffering a stroke in November. The king had handed over the affairs of state Jan. 1 to his half-brother and heir apparent, Crown Prince Abdullah, while he recuperated, but Saudi officials made clear at the time that he had not abdicated.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1999 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The curse of cheap crude may turn out to be a blessing of sorts for the oil industry if the yearlong crash in prices forces the reopening of the Persian Gulf to foreign investors.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Saudi government expelled the Afghan charge d'affaires Tuesday and recalled its representative from Kabul, the official news agency reported. The Afghan envoy was ordered to leave "due to Saudi Arabia's national interests," the Saudi Press Agency said. Saudi Arabia is one of three countries that has recognized the Taliban religious militia as the legitimate government in war-racked Afghanistan. The others are Pakistan and the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
December 28, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after Saudi Arabia's monarch suffered a serious stroke, the kingdom has all but completed a quiet but decisive transition from ailing King Fahd to Crown Prince Abdullah, a shift altering issues ranging from Persian Gulf policies to U.S. relations, according to Western envoys in the kingdom and American analysts. "Abdullah, who was for decades a man of the future, has recently very much become the man of the hour," said a former U.S. official with continuing ties to the region.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. authorities expressed optimism Tuesday that a Saudi dissident deported to the U.S. will now provide crucial leads about the perpetrators of last June's terrorist bombing in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 American service personnel. The suspect, Hani Abdel Rahim Hussein Sayegh, was sent from Canada on Tuesday in time for a federal court hearing today, according to Michael Wildes, his U.S. lawyer. After weeks of on-again, off-again negotiations with U.S.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI Director Louis J. Freeh, ending a visit to Saudi Arabia on Sunday, said he is encouraged by Saudi efforts to investigate the June truck bombing that killed 19 Americans. But Freeh left Riyadh, the Saudi capital, without disclosing what progress, if any, had been made in the investigation into the June 25 attack on a U.S. military housing complex in Dhahran. Clinton administration officials have expressed frustration with the investigation, run primarily by the Saudis with FBI participation.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Bandar ibn Sultan, ambassador to the United States, son of the defense minister, nephew of kings and grandson of the great Abdulaziz ibn Saud--who by his wiles and steel unified the warring tribes to create Saudi Arabia--twirled a huge cigar as he rode in his private Boeing 707 and explained why his country is unfazed by Islamic extremists, despite two recent bombings. Look at Egypt, he said. There, the secular government and the extremists are far apart on matters of religion.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States expressed pleasure that King Fahd of Saudi Arabia has resumed his duties after an illness and said it looks forward to many years of cooperation with him. The 74-year-old king, who is diabetic, overweight and walks with a cane, handed over affairs of state to Crown Prince Abdullah 7 1/2 weeks ago following a stroke. But Wednesday night he announced his return to the helm, puzzling many who had thought it unlikely he would do so.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | Associated Press
King Fahd, leader of the world's largest oil-exporting state, temporarily turned control of the Saudi government over to his half-brother on Monday, saying he needed to rest. The announcement by Fahd, who has a long history of health problems, raised new questions about his health and was certain to cause jitters on the oil markets when trading resumes today after the New Year's holiday. Fahd, who is in his 70s, did not say how long he needed to rest or give any other details.
NEWS
May 27, 1996 | Associated Press
King Fahd of Saudi Arabia may soon leave on a trip to Spain and never come back, completing a gradual transition of authority to his half brother, Time magazine reported Sunday. The king fell ill in November with a reported stroke. He returned from official convalescence on Jan. 1, but the magazine, citing a diplomat it did not identify, said Fahd suffers dementia. Fahd, believed to be in his early 70s, transferred power to his half brother, Crown Prince Abdullah, after the stroke.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States expressed pleasure that King Fahd of Saudi Arabia has resumed his duties after an illness and said it looks forward to many years of cooperation with him. The 74-year-old king, who is diabetic, overweight and walks with a cane, handed over affairs of state to Crown Prince Abdullah 7 1/2 weeks ago following a stroke. But Wednesday night he announced his return to the helm, puzzling many who had thought it unlikely he would do so.
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