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Saudi Arabia Government Agencies

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NEWS
November 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With pressure for democratic reform mounting in the monarchies of the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia's King Fahd has announced that the kingdom is preparing to resurrect a national consultative assembly. The assembly--which would probably be appointed at first but eventually chosen by national election--would for the first time in recent years give Saudi Arabia's increasingly restless intelligentsia and business community an official place in government decision-making.
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NEWS
March 2, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia's King Fahd announced major new steps toward democratic reform Sunday, creating a national Consultative Council to provide citizens a voice in government and spelling out guarantees for personal liberties for the first time in the history of the conservative desert kingdom. The king may also have opened the door to younger, more dynamic members of the ruling Saud dynasty to succeed to the throne in future years.
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NEWS
March 2, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia's King Fahd announced major new steps toward democratic reform Sunday, creating a national Consultative Council to provide citizens a voice in government and spelling out guarantees for personal liberties for the first time in the history of the conservative desert kingdom. The king may also have opened the door to younger, more dynamic members of the ruling Saud dynasty to succeed to the throne in future years.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With pressure for democratic reform mounting in the monarchies of the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia's King Fahd has announced that the kingdom is preparing to resurrect a national consultative assembly. The assembly--which would probably be appointed at first but eventually chosen by national election--would for the first time in recent years give Saudi Arabia's increasingly restless intelligentsia and business community an official place in government decision-making.
WORLD
January 28, 2007 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
The change came several years ago for Maryam Arrakal. Her husband brought a black, all-covering abaya back to this steamy, subtropical town from the desert sands of Saudi Arabia. It contrasted starkly with the pastel saris she normally wore. But in the 12 years that her husband, Kunchava, had been running a Saudi fabric shop, he had become detached from this melting pot of Muslims, Hindus and Christians, and more drawn to the Saudis' strict version of Islam.
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