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NEWS
December 7, 1992 | Associated Press
A British hospital manager working in Saudi Arabia has been sentenced to 50 lashes for swearing at his staff, the Foreign Office says. The Mail on Sunday newspaper reported that David Brown, 32, was arrested by the religious police after swearing at Saudi employees. The flogging is likely to be carried out in public with a bamboo cane, the paper said. Brown is appealing the sentence.
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NEWS
January 31, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the body of nurse Yvonne Gilford was found Dec. 11, fear rippled through the walled compounds where foreigners live in Saudi Arabia. The 55-year-old Australian had suffered a grisly death. She had been stabbed four times, beaten with a hammer and suffocated in her bed. In a country that by world standards is almost crime-free, some wondered if a maniac was on the loose. Or was the murder politically motivated, akin to the bombing of the U.S.
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NEWS
November 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plan to send El Dorado County Christmas trees to troops in the Middle East has hit a snag. Volunteers were informed by the U.S. Embassy in Saudi Arabia that the importation of any product for religious holidays other than the Islamic religion is prohibited. The county's Christmas tree growers have made 35 trees available to be shipped in specially designed mailing tubes. Local banks donated money and schoolchildren planned to make decorations.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | Associated Press
A British hospital manager working in Saudi Arabia has been sentenced to 50 lashes for swearing at his staff, the Foreign Office says. The Mail on Sunday newspaper reported that David Brown, 32, was arrested by the religious police after swearing at Saudi employees. The flogging is likely to be carried out in public with a bamboo cane, the paper said. Brown is appealing the sentence.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family portraits hang in two rows on the living room wall, just above the sofa. There is Wahid Ishgi's, looking stern and fatherly, and his wife's, with her dangling earrings and irrepressible smile. Below those are school photographs of the girls. Well, most of the girls. Sixteen-year-old Meme ordered hers removed last year, lest an uncle or a cousin enter the house and see her face unveiled.
NEWS
August 19, 1987
Police in Saudi Arabia detained 87 foreigners, including six Americans, after a weekend party that violated the kingdom's strict ban on liquor. The party in the Red Sea port of Jidda was given by an American, but diplomats declined to identify him. At least 37 Canadian and British air stewardesses and British nurses were reported among the detainees. The Saudis later released 25 Canadian stewardesses, Canadian officials said.
NEWS
June 30, 1988
Saudi Arabia has warned Shia Muslims that they face Koranic punishments, which include beheading and crucifixion, if they disrupt this year's pilgrimage in Mecca, the official Saudi Press Agency reported. The Saudi government said it will punish "any act of disturbance, terrorism or sabotage such as demonstrations, slogan shouting and carrying of posters and banners, use of loud-speakers and blocking of roads and delaying of pilgrims from performing the rites," the news agency said.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | Associated Press
About 50 Saudi women, saying the kingdom's ban on female drivers would leave them helpless in the event of war, took to the streets for an unprecedented protest Tuesday--behind the wheel. The women, many of them completely veiled except for their eyes, piled into 15 cars and took a drive through the capital. They had learned to drive outside Saudi Arabia. "This has nothing whatsoever to do with politics," one woman said. "If a crisis erupts, we must drive for the sake of our families.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in Jidda, in a dark, crowded prison cell, six young men await their encounter with Islamic justice for ambushing a bus with guns this month and slightly wounding two American GIs. Justice for the men--four Palestinians and two Yemenis--is apt to be swift.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing mounting demands from religious conservatives, the Saudi government has announced that women who drive automobiles in the kingdom are "portents of evil" and will be subject to "appropriate punishment." "Women's driving of cars contradicts the sound Islamic attitude of the Saudi citizen, who is jealous about his sacred ideals," the Saudi Ministry of Interior said in announcing the kingdom's first legal ban on women driving.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their black cloaks and veils hanging neatly in the marble foyer, Omaima Khamis, her sisters and girlfriends gathered in the parlor to eat dates, drink spiced coffee and discuss fashion, family and astrological signs. No men would enter this world, a world segregated and regulated, like much of Saudi Arabia, by the dictates of 7th-Century Islamic beliefs.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in Jidda, in a dark, crowded prison cell, six young men await their encounter with Islamic justice for ambushing a bus with guns this month and slightly wounding two American GIs. Justice for the men--four Palestinians and two Yemenis--is apt to be swift.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plan to send El Dorado County Christmas trees to troops in the Middle East has hit a snag. Volunteers were informed by the U.S. Embassy in Saudi Arabia that the importation of any product for religious holidays other than the Islamic religion is prohibited. The county's Christmas tree growers have made 35 trees available to be shipped in specially designed mailing tubes. Local banks donated money and schoolchildren planned to make decorations.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's first woman driver was Genevra Delphine Mudge. She drove a Locomobile in New York City in 1899, skidded on a patch of snow and knocked down five pedestrians. In the near-century since, chauvinists have made sure the reputation of women at the wheel has remained in reverse. Now the government of Saudi Arabia, responding to religious conservatives, has said women motorists are "portents of evil" who will be banned from driving.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing mounting demands from religious conservatives, the Saudi government has announced that women who drive automobiles in the kingdom are "portents of evil" and will be subject to "appropriate punishment." "Women's driving of cars contradicts the sound Islamic attitude of the Saudi citizen, who is jealous about his sacred ideals," the Saudi Ministry of Interior said in announcing the kingdom's first legal ban on women driving.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stringently enforcing a no-booze policy, military authorities have imposed heavy fines on 12 American servicemen and are considering more severe action against a dozen others found drunk or in possession of alcohol in this legally dry kingdom. The actions under military law make clear the determination of American commanders to enforce round-the-clock abstinence from alcohol--unprecedented in a U.S. combat theater--even though it is a source of friction with troops, according to U.S. officials.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From Reuters
Two brothers convicted of murder have been beheaded in Saudi Arabia after spending the past 19 years in jail, local newspapers reported Friday. The brothers were jailed until the son of the man they killed came of age to decide if he wanted compensation or execution under the strict rules of Sharia (Islamic law).
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America's first woman driver was Genevra Delphine Mudge. She drove a Locomobile in New York City in 1899, skidded on a patch of snow and knocked down five pedestrians. In the near-century since, chauvinists have made sure the reputation of women at the wheel has remained in reverse. Now the government of Saudi Arabia, responding to religious conservatives, has said women motorists are "portents of evil" who will be banned from driving.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | Associated Press
About 50 Saudi women, saying the kingdom's ban on female drivers would leave them helpless in the event of war, took to the streets for an unprecedented protest Tuesday--behind the wheel. The women, many of them completely veiled except for their eyes, piled into 15 cars and took a drive through the capital. They had learned to drive outside Saudi Arabia. "This has nothing whatsoever to do with politics," one woman said. "If a crisis erupts, we must drive for the sake of our families.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | Reuters
The Dutch brewer Bavaria BV said Friday it received a very large order for alcohol-free beer for thirsty American troops in Saudi Arabia. It declined to say just how big the order was, but a spokesman said there might be problems meeting it because stocks are low after a long, hot summer in Europe. Saudi Arabia's Islamic law prohibits the consumption of alcohol. U.S.
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