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August 20, 1990 | This is a pool report by reporters flown to Saudi Arabia by the Pentagon. Times staff writer Michael Ross is one of the pool members, who are not allowed to disclose their exact location. and
The U.S. military, mindful of the toll taken by terrorists the last time American troops were on Middle East soil, is improving the security for its growing force in Saudi Arabia. Already strict security measures have been tightened even more in the past 72 hours, as Saudi officials expressed more concern about the possibility of terrorist attacks, a subject U.S. military officials refuse to discuss except in general terms.
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WORLD
October 18, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
A day after the United Nations elected Saudi Arabia to a prestigious seat on the Security Council, the Saudi leadership refused to accept the position and lashed out at the world body for "double standards" and failure to protect peace. It was a stunning and unprecedented rebuke of the U.N. Security Council, diplomats and academics said, especially after the recent breakthrough in getting the unanimous approval of the 15-member council on a plan to rid Syria of its chemical weapons.
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NEWS
November 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi fighter planes have increased reconnaissance activity near the Saudi border in the last two weeks, indicating a heightened military alert against a possible U.S. strike, according to American and Saudi officials. The stepped-up Iraqi missions, including high-speed charges toward the border, are regarded as a response to new bellicosity from the United States and as the clearest sign to date that Iraq is taking the American threats seriously, the officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after a fire killed hundreds of Muslims on an annual holy pilgrimage to Mecca, Los Angeles-area Islamic leaders told followers that it is their duty to demand better safeguards from the Saudi Arabian government.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Egyptian and Syrian troops will be stationed in Kuwait and other areas of the Persian Gulf as part of a postwar regional peace force in exchange for billions of dollars in economic aid from the oil-rich Arab nations, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia, the petroleum powerhouse that for years has dominated policy-making within the Middle East, suddenly may have to answer to Iraq in everything from oil pricing and production policies to foreign relations--with or without any new military aggression by the Iraqis, regional experts fear.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon notified Congress on Monday that it plans to sell Saudi Arabia $365 million worth of bombs and missiles, including controversial cluster bombs and laser-guidance kits that transform ordinary bombs into "smart" weapons with pinpoint accuracy. Saudi Arabia needs the munitions to replace those used during the six-week Persian Gulf air war, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials are considering a stronger travel warning for Americans in Saudi Arabia and contemplating a reduction in embassy staffs throughout the Middle East in areas where there might be popular opposition to a military conflict with Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after a fire killed hundreds of Muslims on an annual holy pilgrimage to Mecca, Los Angeles-area Islamic leaders told followers that it is their duty to demand better safeguards from the Saudi Arabian government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1997 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after a fire killed hundreds of Muslims on an annual holy pilgrimage to Mecca, Los Angeles-area Islamic leaders told followers that it is their duty to demand better safeguards from the Saudi Arabian government.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Bandar ibn Sultan, ambassador to the United States, son of the defense minister, nephew of kings and grandson of the great Abdulaziz ibn Saud--who by his wiles and steel unified the warring tribes to create Saudi Arabia--twirled a huge cigar as he rode in his private Boeing 707 and explained why his country is unfazed by Islamic extremists, despite two recent bombings. Look at Egypt, he said. There, the secular government and the extremists are far apart on matters of religion.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In retrospect, Communique 43, put out three weeks ago by a London-based Saudi opposition group, looks prophetic: "CDLR warns that the United States is viewed, by the public at large, as an accomplice of the Saudi tyranny . . . and as an unjust racist imperial power in general," said the statement from the Committee for the Defense of Legitimate Rights, distributed worldwide by the group's sophisticated fax network.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States received threats against its diplomatic and military personnel in Saudi Arabia prior to Monday's deadly bombing but decided not to alter security arrangements because the desert kingdom has been among the world's "safest places," U.S. Ambassador Raymond Mabus said in Riyadh on Wednesday. U.S. intelligence has also been aware for several months that Iranian agents put U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon notified Congress on Monday that it plans to sell Saudi Arabia $365 million worth of bombs and missiles, including controversial cluster bombs and laser-guidance kits that transform ordinary bombs into "smart" weapons with pinpoint accuracy. Saudi Arabia needs the munitions to replace those used during the six-week Persian Gulf air war, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The no-questions-asked days of Saudi Arabia's checkbook diplomacy are fast coming to an end. Dismayed that some of the world's top recipients of Saudi aid sided with Iraq during the Persian Gulf War, kingdom officials have reversed one of this nation's longstanding policies: From now on, Saudi Arabia will be more selective about the millions of dollars it regularly dishes out to other countries and causes.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | Reuters
The Saudi government has boosted security to counter any attempt by Iraqi saboteurs to blow up its oil fields before and after the Persian Gulf crisis deadline Jan. 15. Industry and government sources said that more guards, hundreds of security gates and alarms have been placed at the Dhahran nerve center of the huge state-owned Saudi Aramco oil company.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four days after Iraq overran tiny Kuwait, the leaders of neighboring Saudi Arabia lived in fear that their oil-rich kingdom was next on Saddam Hussein's hit list and that little could be done to stop him, the Saudi ambassador to the United States said Saturday. "Four hours after that invasion, we were saying, 'How long will it take them before they go into Saudi Arabia?' " said the ambassador, Prince Bandar ibn Sultan.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Egyptian and Syrian troops will be stationed in Kuwait and other areas of the Persian Gulf as part of a postwar regional peace force in exchange for billions of dollars in economic aid from the oil-rich Arab nations, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military authorities said they believe Iraqi terrorists have infiltrated Saudi Arabia and are capable of striking when they choose. Allied officers here also expressed heightened anxiety about a desperate military strike by Saddam Hussein--perhaps mobilization of his hidden air force for a bombing raid south into Saudi Arabia or the Persian Gulf. In some areas of the region, security this weekend has become even tighter than the usual. Ground movements are restricted.
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