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Saudi Arabia Women

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NEWS
March 31, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost five months after their bold crime, the women who dared to drive are still jobless and trapped in a country where they have suffered scorn and ridicule. By driving a convoy of cars through the streets of Riyadh on Nov. 6, at a time when a world on the brink of war focused attention on Saudi Arabia, 49 Saudi women violated longstanding Islamic tradition to press demands for a limited agenda of equal rights and opportunity.
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NEWS
March 22, 2003 | Tyler Marshall and Jailan Zayan;Alissa J. Rubin; David Lamb; Kim Murphy
Emotions spilled into the streets of several Arab capitals Friday, with antiwar protesters in Egypt, Yemen, Jordan and Kuwait attacking police and shouting anti-American slogans. In the Yemeni capital, Sana, gunfire erupted at a protest outside the U.S. Embassy, killing at least two people. In Cairo, as many as 40,000 demonstrators turned out, burning U.S.
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NEWS
November 24, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family portraits hang in two rows on the living room wall, just above the sofa. There is Wahid Ishgi's, looking stern and fatherly, and his wife's, with her dangling earrings and irrepressible smile. Below those are school photographs of the girls. Well, most of the girls. Sixteen-year-old Meme ordered hers removed last year, lest an uncle or a cousin enter the house and see her face unveiled.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost five months after their bold crime, the women who dared to drive are still jobless and trapped in a country where they have suffered scorn and ridicule. By driving a convoy of cars through the streets of Riyadh on Nov. 6, at a time when a world on the brink of war focused attention on Saudi Arabia, 49 Saudi women violated longstanding Islamic tradition to press demands for a limited agenda of equal rights and opportunity.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservative backlash against a group of Saudi women who challenged Muslim tradition by driving their cars in public has swept two women's university campuses, prompting the suspension of at least six participating professors whose students labeled them "infidels." The women were suspended by royal decree from their teaching jobs at the women's section of King Saud University after hundreds of students signed petitions asserting they do not want to be taught by the women.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | Associated Press
About 50 Saudi women, saying the kingdom's ban on female drivers would leave them helpless in the event of war, took to the streets for an unprecedented protest Tuesday--behind the wheel. The women, many of them completely veiled except for their eyes, piled into 15 cars and took a drive through the capital. They had learned to drive outside Saudi Arabia. "This has nothing whatsoever to do with politics," one woman said. "If a crisis erupts, we must drive for the sake of our families.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing mounting demands from religious conservatives, the Saudi government has announced that women who drive automobiles in the kingdom are "portents of evil" and will be subject to "appropriate punishment." "Women's driving of cars contradicts the sound Islamic attitude of the Saudi citizen, who is jealous about his sacred ideals," the Saudi Ministry of Interior said in announcing the kingdom's first legal ban on women driving.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | From Reuters
A new hospital which will treat and employ only women will soon open in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, a Saudi Arabian newspaper reported Friday. Al Madina said the privately owned, 50-bed hospital will open by the end of the year and be run by women doctors and staff.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With pressure for democratic reform mounting in the monarchies of the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia's King Fahd has announced that the kingdom is preparing to resurrect a national consultative assembly. The assembly--which would probably be appointed at first but eventually chosen by national election--would for the first time in recent years give Saudi Arabia's increasingly restless intelligentsia and business community an official place in government decision-making.
NEWS
March 22, 2003 | Tyler Marshall and Jailan Zayan;Alissa J. Rubin; David Lamb; Kim Murphy
Emotions spilled into the streets of several Arab capitals Friday, with antiwar protesters in Egypt, Yemen, Jordan and Kuwait attacking police and shouting anti-American slogans. In the Yemeni capital, Sana, gunfire erupted at a protest outside the U.S. Embassy, killing at least two people. In Cairo, as many as 40,000 demonstrators turned out, burning U.S.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing mounting demands from religious conservatives, the Saudi government has announced that women who drive automobiles in the kingdom are "portents of evil" and will be subject to "appropriate punishment." "Women's driving of cars contradicts the sound Islamic attitude of the Saudi citizen, who is jealous about his sacred ideals," the Saudi Ministry of Interior said in announcing the kingdom's first legal ban on women driving.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservative backlash against a group of Saudi women who challenged Muslim tradition by driving their cars in public has swept two women's university campuses, prompting the suspension of at least six participating professors whose students labeled them "infidels." The women were suspended by royal decree from their teaching jobs at the women's section of King Saud University after hundreds of students signed petitions asserting they do not want to be taught by the women.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With pressure for democratic reform mounting in the monarchies of the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia's King Fahd has announced that the kingdom is preparing to resurrect a national consultative assembly. The assembly--which would probably be appointed at first but eventually chosen by national election--would for the first time in recent years give Saudi Arabia's increasingly restless intelligentsia and business community an official place in government decision-making.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | Associated Press
About 50 Saudi women, saying the kingdom's ban on female drivers would leave them helpless in the event of war, took to the streets for an unprecedented protest Tuesday--behind the wheel. The women, many of them completely veiled except for their eyes, piled into 15 cars and took a drive through the capital. They had learned to drive outside Saudi Arabia. "This has nothing whatsoever to do with politics," one woman said. "If a crisis erupts, we must drive for the sake of our families.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family portraits hang in two rows on the living room wall, just above the sofa. There is Wahid Ishgi's, looking stern and fatherly, and his wife's, with her dangling earrings and irrepressible smile. Below those are school photographs of the girls. Well, most of the girls. Sixteen-year-old Meme ordered hers removed last year, lest an uncle or a cousin enter the house and see her face unveiled.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | From Reuters
A new hospital which will treat and employ only women will soon open in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, a Saudi Arabian newspaper reported Friday. Al Madina said the privately owned, 50-bed hospital will open by the end of the year and be run by women doctors and staff.
WORLD
June 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities have ordered banks to separate female and male workers at their headquarters, a new setback for women's rights in the kingdom. Banks are one of the main employers of women in Saudi Arabia. Although women are separated from men in branches, they have worked together in bank headquarters. Saudi Arabia's strict law and customs prohibit unrelated men and women from mixing, and women from driving cars and voting in municipal elections.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | KIM MURPHY
If the coffee shop is the sole dominion of the male in Egypt, it is not because women are confined to home--at least, not always. While her husband sips and smokes at the corner cafe, the modern Egyptian professional woman is likely to be lunching with her girlfriends at a five-star hotel or meeting her sister downtown for a pastry and a cup of tea.
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