Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSaudi Arabian
IN THE NEWS

Saudi Arabian

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel and Joe Serna
The $5 million bail posted to free a jailed Saudi princess accused of human trafficking was paid by the Saudi Arabian consulate, the Orange County Sheriff's Department said Friday. Meshael Alayban was released from custody before 6 p.m. Thursday, the day after being taken into custody by Irvine police, Orange County Sheriff's Department records show.   “They brought in a check, the funds were verified,” Lt. Jeff Hollock said. The consulate representative presented the $5 million check to the cashier's office at the jail's Intake Release Center in Santa Ana about 3 p.m. Thursday, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2013 | By Jason Song
At first glance, the Facebook photo doesn't look like a USC alumni gathering: No cardinal and gold in sight, not a single Tommy Trojan to be found. But, on closer inspection, it's apparent that half of the smiling men are flashing the Trojan "victory" sign. "At USC, you quickly develop a sense of pride being a top university," said Bahjat Zayed, the past president of the 120-member USC Alumni Club of Arabia, one of the university's fastest growing graduate groups. The club is one sign of the rapid rise of Saudi Arabians studying in the United States.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The virus known as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, or MERS -- which has so far killed 38 of the 64 people known to have been infected with it -- has been especially aggressive in Saudi Arabia, where, as of Wednesday, health officials had reported 49 cases and 32 deaths . Now a team of U.S. and Canadian scientists has teamed with Saudi health officials and others to report on how MERS spread through four hospitals in the eastern part...
SCIENCE
September 25, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The World Health Organization's emergency committee on the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, met Wednesday. After hearing updates on the spread of the virus -- which as of Sept. 20 had killed 58 of the 130 people confirmed to have contracted it, most in Saudi Arabia -- the committee decided against calling the outbreak a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern”: a situation that requires a certain level of immediate, coordinated international action.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1985
Saudi production jumped to between 3.6 million and 3.8 million barrels a day last month, up from between 2.8 million and 3 million barrels a day in September. The increase was attributed to price reductions put into effect by the Saudis through "net-back" pricing agreements with Exxon, Mobil and Texaco. North Sea production rose 13.4% in September to 3.4 million barrels daily.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
A Saudi Arabian citizen was arrested in an FBI sting operation on suspicion of accepting bribes to issue American visas to Saudi nationals, authorities said Sunday. Abdulla Noman, who works for the U.S. Commerce Department issuing visas at the U.S. Consulate in Jidda, Saudi Arabia, was arrested Thursday in a Las Vegas Strip hotel room, authorities said. He is being held in federal custody. The FBI is not specifically probing ties between Noman and terrorists who carried out the Sept.
FOOD
June 21, 1990 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The one thing everybody knows about Saudi cuisine is the moment in "Lawrence of Arabia" where Peter O'Toole's Bedouin guide handed him some nondescript mush with the ominous words, "Bedu food." O'Toole's expression spoke volumes. Of course, what he was being given was merely a sort of trail mix. In the towns and villages, Saudis cook much like their neighbors in the Fertile Crescent countries, Egypt and the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
October 22, 1995 | From Times Wires Services
Six people were killed and more than 100 injured when a bomb exploded at a village mosque Friday, the official Saudi Press Agency reported Saturday. About 500 worshipers were inside the mosque when the blast occurred during midday prayers on the Muslim Sabbath, the agency quoted an unidentified Interior Ministry official as saying. Security forces reportedly rushed to the scene and surrounded the mosque in the village of Al Qubah, in the southwestern region of Bishah.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
TELLURIDE, Colo. - Wearing high-top tennis shoes and headphones, 11-year-old Wadjda doesn't look like much of a revolutionary. But in filmmaker Haifaa Mansour's new Saudi Arabian movie, the young girl is just that - as is Mansour herself. Having its North American premiere at the Telluride Film Festival, "Wadjda" has become one of the event's most talked-about movies, as much as for what's on screen as for how the story was brought to the screen. The first Saudi feature directed by a woman, "Wadjda" was made entirely inside the repressive country.
NEWS
July 30, 1987 | From Reuters
A drug dealer was executed by beheading in the Saudi Arabian capital of Riyadh on Wednesday, Riyadh radio reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
The Kenyan domestic servant who worked for a Saudi Arabian princess accused of human trafficking was not mistreated but instead flew first class, had her own cell phone and was given access to the spa and gym, attorneys for the princess said. Meshael Alayban, 42, was arrested at her home in Irvine this month for allegedly forcing the Kenyan woman to work 16 hours a day, seven days a week, for $220 a month. The servant, who has a young daughter in Kenya, could not leave because her passport was kept in a safe deposit box at a local bank, prosecutors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
A Saudi royal princess did not appear in court Monday on human trafficking charges, drawing a rebuke from an Orange County judge who said “I expect her to be here” for future hearings. Meshael Alayban, 42, is charged with forcing a Kenyan woman to work as a domestic servant, toiling long hours for little pay. Orange County Superior Court Judge Gerald Johnston said he was concerned that the princess did not show up in court, but could not find anything in the court record to indicate that her presence for the hearing had been ordered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel and Joe Serna
The $5 million bail posted to free a jailed Saudi princess accused of human trafficking was paid by the Saudi Arabian consulate, the Orange County Sheriff's Department said Friday. Meshael Alayban was released from custody before 6 p.m. Thursday, the day after being taken into custody by Irvine police, Orange County Sheriff's Department records show.   “They brought in a check, the funds were verified,” Lt. Jeff Hollock said. The consulate representative presented the $5 million check to the cashier's office at the jail's Intake Release Center in Santa Ana about 3 p.m. Thursday, he said.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The virus known as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, or MERS -- which has so far killed 38 of the 64 people known to have been infected with it -- has been especially aggressive in Saudi Arabia, where, as of Wednesday, health officials had reported 49 cases and 32 deaths . Now a team of U.S. and Canadian scientists has teamed with Saudi health officials and others to report on how MERS spread through four hospitals in the eastern part...
WORLD
January 15, 2013 | By Reem Abdellatif
CAIRO - An Egyptian human rights lawyer was sentenced Tuesday to five years in prison and 300 lashes by a court in Saudi Arabia after being found guilty of smuggling drugs into the kingdom. Ahmed Gizawy was arrested with his wife on their way to a pilgrimage to Mecca in April, allegedly carrying 20,000 prescription anti-anxiety pills. The Egyptian consulate in the kingdom said it would appeal the ruling, according to Egypt's state news agency. The court also convicted an Egyptian who was traveling with Gizawy to six years and 400 lashes, the news agency reported.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
The Ikea catalog distributed in Saudi Arabia is the same as in other countries except for what it's missing - women. The Swedish publication Metro has posted a comparison of the Saudi Arabian mailer and the Swedish version, showing that women present in the latter were missing from the former. In one instance, a pajama-clad woman - shown standing at a bathroom sink along with a man, young boy and toddler nearby - was erased from the catalog distributed in the Arab nation, leaving just the three other people in the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2008 | Swati Pandey, Times Staff Writer
Zoe Ferraris' Ukrainian American grandmother thought her so spoiled that she would only marry a sheik. But Ferraris, then a San Francisco teen, didn't quite catch her meaning. "I thought it was some fairy-tale punishment, having to marry a sheet, having to do all the [house] work," Ferraris said. "When I did get married, she said, 'I told you so.'
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | From Reuters
A 100-year-old Saudi Arabian has remarried because he missed conversation after his wife died three years ago, the newspaper Al Yom reported. "Now I have someone to talk to," Abdullah Mouzaal told the Dammam-based daily after settling down with his 80-year-old bride.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
TELLURIDE, Colo. - Wearing high-top tennis shoes and headphones, 11-year-old Wadjda doesn't look like much of a revolutionary. But in filmmaker Haifaa Mansour's new Saudi Arabian movie, the young girl is just that - as is Mansour herself. Having its North American premiere at the Telluride Film Festival, "Wadjda" has become one of the event's most talked-about movies, as much as for what's on screen as for how the story was brought to the screen. The first Saudi feature directed by a woman, "Wadjda" was made entirely inside the repressive country.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2011 | Ken Dilanian, Paul Richter and Brian Bennett
Though initially skeptical that top Iranian regime figures were behind a plot to assassinate Saudi Arabia's ambassador to Washington, U.S. government officials became convinced by the operation's money trail and now consider it likely that Iran's supreme leader was aware of the plan. "This is the kind of operation -- the assassination of a diplomat on foreign soil -- that would have been vetted at the highest levels of the Iranian government," said a senior U.S. official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about sensitive analyses.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|