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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1990
We are not int he Middle East because of oil, we are there to insure that women can drive in Saudi Arabia. We go wherever driving privileges are "at risk." DOUGLAS INGOLDSBY Santa Barbara
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WORLD
October 26, 2013 | By Laura King
CAIRO - Some dared to drive. Others stayed home, but promised to take to the roads another day. Calls for a nationwide “drive-in” to protest Saudi Arabia's de facto ban on women driving were softened at the eleventh hour by organizers, who said Saudi Arabian authorities threatened them with serious consequences if they drove on Saturday. Activists urged female would-be motorists to instead make it an ongoing campaign, and to get behind the wheel whenever they could. They said about 60 women altogether reported they had driven in Saudi Arabia on Saturday, with more than a dozen uploading videos of themselves doing so. Even on a smaller scale than originally envisioned, it was the year's biggest action against the restriction.
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NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Carla Hall
Just when you thought Saudi Arabia might be edging its way into the 21 st century - or even the late 20 th - the country's sports minister dispelled that notion with the disappointing and troubling announcement that no women will officially represent the country at the 2012 Olympics.  Only last week, Prince Nayef ibn Abdulaziz had said women could represent Saudi Arabia as long as their participation did not conflict with Islamic laws....
OPINION
October 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Give women the vote and what outrageous thing happens next? In Saudi Arabia, they start demanding the keys to the car. Thus a relative handful of brave Saudi women will slip behind the wheel Saturday for a "Day of Female Driving. " Saudi Arabia is the only nation that bars women from driving. Not that there's an actual law against them doing so. But the government won't issue them licenses. There are, however, women with licenses obtained in other countries; they will be the driving force, if you will, of the Saturday demonstration.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | Associated Press
About 50 Saudi women, saying the kingdom's ban on female drivers would leave them helpless in the event of war, took to the streets for an unprecedented protest Tuesday--behind the wheel. The women, many of them completely veiled except for their eyes, piled into 15 cars and took a drive through the capital. They had learned to drive outside Saudi Arabia. "This has nothing whatsoever to do with politics," one woman said. "If a crisis erupts, we must drive for the sake of our families.
WORLD
June 18, 2011 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
She got her driver's license in Indiana. She likes to drive fast. And on Friday, Maha Qahtani, 39, in a face-covering niqab , raced through the streets of Riyadh in her family's blue Hummer H3, defying Saudi Arabia's religion-inspired bans on female motorists. In all, nearly three dozen Saudi women got behind the wheels of various vehicles Friday, human rights activists said, in what was billed on social networking websites as a day of defiance against the ultra-conservative kingdom's longstanding driving decrees.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost five months after their bold crime, the women who dared to drive are still jobless and trapped in a country where they have suffered scorn and ridicule. By driving a convoy of cars through the streets of Riyadh on Nov. 6, at a time when a world on the brink of war focused attention on Saudi Arabia, 49 Saudi women violated longstanding Islamic tradition to press demands for a limited agenda of equal rights and opportunity.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservative backlash against a group of Saudi women who challenged Muslim tradition by driving their cars in public has swept two women's university campuses, prompting the suspension of at least six participating professors whose students labeled them "infidels." The women were suspended by royal decree from their teaching jobs at the women's section of King Saud University after hundreds of students signed petitions asserting they do not want to be taught by the women.
WORLD
June 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
Eight Saudi women appeared on a groundbreaking television program this week, speaking on subjects that have until now been taboo for them, such as the right to drive, unemployment and political participation among women. Wearing headscarves of red, blue and yellow -- instead of traditional black -- the participants complained about their lack of jobs, opportunities and public voice in this conservative kingdom, where women have less freedom than in many other Muslim nations.
OPINION
December 25, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Women in Saudi Arabia won a small but promising victory this year. No, they aren't being allowed to drive; that's still forbidden. Most of the time, they still can't work, travel or even open bank accounts without the approval of a male guardian. But they do have this: Saudi women can now buy lingerie in stores from female salesclerks, instead of the sometimes leering men who used to staff the counters. If this modest wave of liberalization continues, they may even get fitting rooms. It doesn't sound like much, but in the glacial process of modernization in the tradition-bound kingdom, it's an important step.
WORLD
October 23, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Saudi authorities warned Wednesday that police will respond to a planned "Day of Female Driving" on Saturday by fully implementing laws against "actions that disturb social peace. " But organizers of the women's defiant road rally said they read the official statement from the Interior Ministry not to be directed at them but at conservative supporters of the ban on women drivers, who have called for their own public protest against the driving event. The statement issued by the Interior Ministry and carried by the official Saudi Press Agency said police "will implement regulations against all violators strictly.
WORLD
April 15, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
A Saudi prince has renewed his argument that women should be allowed to drive, saying on Twitter that doing so would eliminate the need for hundreds of thousands of foreign drivers. Activists point out that driving is not actually legally prohibited for Saudi women, but traffic officials refuse to grant them licenses because clerics in the country forbid it. As a result, women rely on drivers to ferry them around, one of many factors pulling foreign workers into the Arab kingdom.
WORLD
January 12, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The king of Saudi Arabia has named dozens of women to serve on his advisory council, a new step in the ultra-religious country where women remain strictly confined in daily life. Thirty women were among 150 people chosen Friday to serve on the council, a purely advisory body. King Abdullah also insisted that women make up at least a fifth of the members of the advisory council in the future, setting out the quota in a royal order. “Women selected as members of the Shura Council will enjoy full rights of membership, be committed to their duties, responsibilities and assume their jobs,” said the royal order published Friday by the official Saudi Press Agency . Plans to grant women seats on the Shura Council were first announced by Abdullah more than a year ago, one in a batch of reforms meant to bolster the standing of Saudi women.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Carla Hall
It's always amusing when celebrities are outraged over the media scrutiny (either from snoopy tabloids or snoopy mainstream publications) of their looks.  And certainly women are judged more than men in this regard. Although that's changing.  Awhile back, tabloids went through a season of speculation over whether Michael Douglas had had a face lift.  And who can forget the great fun that every outlet had with Nick Nolte's wild-haired arrest mugshot?  Some pundit even took the hallowed George Clooney to task for looking like he had been squeezed into his Armani tux at the Oscars.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Carla Hall
Just when you thought Saudi Arabia might be edging its way into the 21 st century - or even the late 20 th - the country's sports minister dispelled that notion with the disappointing and troubling announcement that no women will officially represent the country at the 2012 Olympics.  Only last week, Prince Nayef ibn Abdulaziz had said women could represent Saudi Arabia as long as their participation did not conflict with Islamic laws....
OPINION
December 25, 2011 | Doyle McManus
Women in Saudi Arabia won a small but promising victory this year. No, they aren't being allowed to drive; that's still forbidden. Most of the time, they still can't work, travel or even open bank accounts without the approval of a male guardian. But they do have this: Saudi women can now buy lingerie in stores from female salesclerks, instead of the sometimes leering men who used to staff the counters. If this modest wave of liberalization continues, they may even get fitting rooms. It doesn't sound like much, but in the glacial process of modernization in the tradition-bound kingdom, it's an important step.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family portraits hang in two rows on the living room wall, just above the sofa. There is Wahid Ishgi's, looking stern and fatherly, and his wife's, with her dangling earrings and irrepressible smile. Below those are school photographs of the girls. Well, most of the girls. Sixteen-year-old Meme ordered hers removed last year, lest an uncle or a cousin enter the house and see her face unveiled.
WORLD
June 18, 2011 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
She got her driver's license in Indiana. She likes to drive fast. And on Friday, Maha Qahtani, 39, in a face-covering niqab , raced through the streets of Riyadh in her family's blue Hummer H3, defying Saudi Arabia's religion-inspired bans on female motorists. In all, nearly three dozen Saudi women got behind the wheels of various vehicles Friday, human rights activists said, in what was billed on social networking websites as a day of defiance against the ultra-conservative kingdom's longstanding driving decrees.
NEWS
August 23, 2009 | Donna Abu-Nasr, Abu-Nasr writes for the Associated Press.
Does Islam frown on nose jobs? Chemical peels? How about breast implants? One of the clerics with the answers is Sheik Mohammed Nujaimi, and Saudi women flock to him for guidance about going under the knife. The results may not see much light of day in a kingdom where women cover up from head to toe, yet cosmetic surgery is booming. Religion covers every facet of life in Saudi Arabia, including plastic surgery. Nujaimi draws his guidelines from the consensus that was reached three years ago when clergymen and plastic surgeons met in Riyadh to determine whether cosmetic procedures violate the Islamic tenet against tampering with God's creation.
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