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WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- President Obama jetted across the Mediterranean Sea on Friday on a diplomatic mission to try to bridge the gaps between the U.S. and its longtime ally, Saudi Arabia. Obama landed in the capital, arriving from Rome where he capped off the European stretch of his week-long trip overseas. The president was greeted by Prince Khalid bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, the governor of Riyadh, and a line of Saudi soldiers before boarding a helicopter bound for a desert camp, the setting for a meeting with the ailing King Abdullah and dinner with the royal family.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - With the appearance of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, in the Arab world's most populous country, health officials face a tough new challenge in confronting the often lethal virus. Egypt's Ministry of Health said Saturday that the country's first case had been discovered, identifying the patient as a 27-year-old Egyptian man who had been living and working in Saudi Arabia's capital, Riyadh. He was placed in quarantine at a Cairo hospital immediately upon his return.
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NEWS
May 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Saudi Arabia gave its official seal of approval Friday on a proposed Arab summit to be held in Morocco.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - Middle East Respiratory Syndrome has come to Egypt. State television said Saturday that the country's first case had been discovered. It said the patient, who was hospitalized in Cairo, had recently traveled to Saudi Arabia, where the virus was first identified. Saudi Arabia had announced hours earlier that the death toll in the kingdom had reached 92. In addition, an Indonesian man who had traveled to Saudi Arabia died Friday after returning home, and the virus has been found elsewhere in the Middle East, including Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.
OPINION
April 27, 2004
Re "Saudi Cleric Denounces Blast Culprits," April 23: It is noteworthy that he condemned the terrorist bombers to "rot in hell" not because they killed and wounded so many human beings but because their victims were Islamic. This cleric can only add to the shame that any decent Muslim must feel. Lou Charloff Encino As the Saudis have now discovered, those who appease the crocodile will be eaten last (Winston Churchill). Perhaps Spain should bear this in mind. Raymond Dyne West Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1994
Your editorial, "Hail to the Chief (Salesman)!" (Feb. 18), regarding President Clinton's role in the Saudis' decision to purchase 50 or more jetliners from Boeing and McDonnell Douglas is very good example of revisionism at work. The world knows that it was George Bush who led the fight against Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, thereby ensuring the safety of the vast Saudi oil fields. The Saudis are showing their gratitude to the U.S. with this large order, which helps our aerospace industry.
NEWS
May 24, 1985 | Associated Press
The fountain of Jidda, financed by King Fahd as a personal gift to this Red Sea port city, will soon be ready for operation and will spout water 861 feet above the harbor, Saudi Arabia's official press agency reported Thursday. The agency said the fountain will be the world's largest and highest of its type.
NEWS
October 23, 1986
Saudi Arabia is planning to establish a submarine fleet, a move that would make it the Middle East's dominant naval force by the mid-1990s, Jane's Defense Weekly reported. The Saudi government has approached six European nations to supply between six and eight submarines at a cost of up to $2.9 billion, the authoritative British defense magazine said.
NEWS
April 14, 1985 | From Reuters
One of the world's most expensive causeways will open in December, linking the island state of Bahrain with Saudi Arabia and highlighting the closer political, economic and defense ties being forged by Persian Gulf Arab countries. Saudi Arabia is footing a bill totaling about $1 billion for the 15.6-mile causeway--including five box-girder road bridges and a man-made central island--constructed by Ballast Nedam of the Netherlands.
WORLD
January 2, 2014 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Carol J. Williams
TEHRAN -- Two deadly bombings in Beirut over the last week and the arrest of a fugitive Saudi militant in the Nov. 19 attack on Iran's embassy in the Lebanese capital reflect the escalating spillover of a proxy war in Syria. Iranian Shiite Muslims and rival Sunnis in Saudi Arabia have been battling for years for dominance in the Middle East. But the rivalry has intensified since May, when the Lebanon-based and Iranian-backed Hezbollah militia made clear it had intervened in Syria's civil war on the side of the embattled Shiite-aligned government.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Eleven new cases of the occasionally fatal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, were reported in Saudi Arabia on Wednesday, two days after the nation's health minister was replaced. In the week ending Monday, 67 cases were reported of the SARS-like virus. One patient died in Riyadh on Monday, the same day that King Abdullah replaced minister Abdullah Rabeeah. Saudi official news outlets reported no specific reason for the ouster. Since the outbreak began in 2012, 272 people have been infected in the oil-rich kingdom, with 81 of them dying.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Sherif Tarek
Prince Bandar bin Sultan's replacement last week as Saudi Arabia's intelligence chief has fueled speculation about a shift in the monarchy's shaky relations with the United States and its position toward the Syrian conflict - not to mention about the prince's political future. Yet many political experts and pundits believe Bandar's departure will barely affect Saudi foreign policies. And they say it's possible the prince could return to the political scene stronger than ever. “The last person to be relieved of his duties [in 2012]
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- President Obama jetted across the Mediterranean Sea on Friday on a diplomatic mission to try to bridge the gaps between the U.S. and its longtime ally, Saudi Arabia. Obama landed in the capital, arriving from Rome where he capped off the European stretch of his week-long trip overseas. The president was greeted by Prince Khalid bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, the governor of Riyadh, and a line of Saudi soldiers before boarding a helicopter bound for a desert camp, the setting for a meeting with the ailing King Abdullah and dinner with the royal family.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- President Obama is weighing whether to allow shoulder-launched anti-aircraft missiles to be shipped to moderate factions of the Syrian opposition, possibly with help from the Saudi government, a U.S. official said Friday. Obama is considering sending man-portable air defense systems, known as “manpads,” along with other supplies to help opposition groups fighting the brutal regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, said the official, who requested anonymity to talk about the internal White House discussions.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - President Obama spoke with Russian President Vladimir Putin for an hour Friday in an effort to resolve the crisis over Ukraine, the first direct conversation between the two leaders after nearly two weeks of tension. Putin initiated the call, White House officials said. It came after a televised interview in which Obama called for Russia to pull its troops back from the Ukrainian border. In the phone conversation, Obama asked Putin to "put a concrete response in writing" to a proposal the United States has made to resolve the crisis, which involved Russia's incursion into the Crimean region of Ukraine.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, Kathleen Hennessey and Laura King
ROME - After spending four days in Europe dealing with the crisis over Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama now turns to a diplomatic challenge of another sort: trying to smooth relations with Saudi Arabia without making the longtime U.S. ally seem like an afterthought. Obama is scheduled to arrive in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, shortly before sunset Friday to meet with King Abdullah, whose inner circle is riled by how the United States has handled Iran's nuclear ambitions and Syria's civil war. Some with close ties to the royal family have talked about breaking ranks with Western partners.
WORLD
December 13, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
In a new effort to persuade Iran to halt its nuclear program, the Obama administration and its European allies are asking Saudi Arabia to help them squeeze Iran's vital oil sector without driving up world energy prices and damaging the global economy. Officials in the United States, France, Britain and other countries have been lobbying the Saudis in recent weeks to produce billions more barrels of oil to provide an alternative source for buyers of Iranian oil. The goal is to keep global prices stable while cutting Iran's ability to sell oil on world markets.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | From Reuters
Iran on Saturday renewed attacks on Saudi Arabia, saying the Saudis have banned its pilgrims from Mecca, and announced a "week of antipathy toward unbelievers" to coincide with next month's event. Mohammed Khatami, Islamic guidance minister, said programs have been arranged for July 5-11 to show Iran's determination to voice its anti-superpower stance.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
BRUSSELS -   The White House said it is “very disappointed” by Saudi Arabia's decision to deny a visa to a White House reporter for the Jerusalem Post who applied to cover President Obama's visit to that Middle East nation this week. The Kingdom did not offer an explanation for its decision to bar Michael Wilner, the paper's White House correspondent, from entering to cover two-day meeting  between Obama and King Abdullah, the Jerusalam Post reported. Senior White House officials lobbied unsuccessfully on behalf of Wilner.
OPINION
March 24, 2014 | By Dennis Ross
President Obama will visit Saudi Arabia this week. Based on what I hear from key Saudis, he is in for a rough reception. Rarely have the Saudis been more skeptical about the United States, and if the president is to affect Saudi behavior, it is important for him to understand why. Fundamentally, the Saudis believe that America's friends and interests are under threat, and the U.S. response has ranged from indifference to accommodation. The Saudis see Iran trying to encircle them with its Quds Force active in Bahrain, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and their own eastern province.
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