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Saul Bellow

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November 24, 1985 | RICHARD EDER
"World's Fair" is E. L. Doctorow's portrait of the artist as a young child. The author's alter-ego, Edgar Altschuler, grows into an awareness that the world stretches far beyond the protective confines of a Bronx Jewish household. It was a quieter passage than Stephen Daedalus' vehement breakout from a constricted Dublin youth, and conducted with far greater cautiousness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
Elmore Leonard populated his novels with con men, hustlers and killers, with names like Chili, Stick and Ordell. He plunged readers into a sea of urban sleaze, spiking his tales with mordant humor and moral ambivalence. In stories often set in Detroit or South Florida, he betrayed a love for down-and-out characters and pitch-perfect dialogue. A line from his novel “Be Cool” makes a point in typical Leonard style: “'Chili Palmer's a talker,'” Nick said. “ 'That's what he does, he talks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Letters Saul Bellow, edited by Benjamin Taylor Viking: 608 pp, $35 Saul Bellow, being Saul Bellow, coined literary profit from emotional tumult. From personal pain came self-exploration and impish bons mots, poured into the heightened confessional of his fiction and also into the letters he fired off throughout his life. These bulletins from the biographical front, as it were, are now collected in a hefty, handsome volume and show that Bellow, while grappling constantly with moods that swung between euphoria and mad suffering, was never not reaching for rapture and grace.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The writer Albert Murray, a maverick intellectual who challenged widespread assumptions about U.S. and African American culture, has died in New York City at age 97. Murray, a novelist as well as essayist and literary and music critic, wrote more than a dozen books, beginning in 1970s with the seminal “The Omni-Americans: Black Experience and American Culture,” which posed a searing critique of both black separatism and white establishment ideas...
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Saul Bellow's new novella, "The Theft" (Viking: $6.95), is built in part around the feelings of a wealthy, elderly American woman for her European au pair: ". . .such a pretty child," the older woman says, "and the Italian charm of her looks, so innocent--although innocence is a tricky thing to prove. You can't expect her to forget about being a girl just because the surroundings are so dangerous." Classically, it is Europe that represents experience, while America is innocence.
BOOKS
October 15, 1989 | Richard Eder
"The book's life lies in the biting growl of the narrator, remembering forgetfulness and upbraiding it."
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
Fonstein, a Polish Jew who fled the Nazis and took up clandestine residence in Rome, is arrested after a police check. In jail, awaiting transportation to a death camp, he receives a message that his cell will be unlocked the following night. A car picks him up, he is taken to Genoa, and put on a Swedish freighter bound for the United States.
BOOKS
June 14, 1987 | Leonard Michaels, Michaels is the author of "The Men's Club" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux/Avon). and
"More Die of Heartbreak" is less like a novel than an anatomy of love in the post-modern age; a loquacious, brilliant, entertaining book, mixing long flights of ideas with comic scenes which says a lot about the "entanglements" of "serious(?)" men and calculating, ditsy, depraved, physically disgusting, and piteously needy women. I would guess that Saul Bellow himself, given his emotional and intellectual investment, really likes women rather in the way a preacher really likes sin.
BOOKS
January 20, 2002 | LEE SIEGEL
If society knew what was good for it, Saul Bellow would be in jail. For behind the great fortune of Bellow's imagination lies the idea of crime. Along with writers from Andre Gide to Isaac Babel to Norman Mailer, Bellow likes to toy with an analogy between lawbreakers and art makers; he sees both the criminal and the artist as original, elemental personalities.
BOOKS
March 19, 1989
Why did the gods and goddesses of antiquity choose mortals for their love affairs? Obviously, because no dalliance can accommodate more than one divinity at a time. This will do as a theme of sorts in Saul Bellow's "Theft," a miscellany of plot-bits, a couple of human sketches, an assortment of caricatures and various personal objections to what's going on nowadays. The author calls it a novella.
NEWS
August 17, 2013 | By Kari Howard
I was talking with one of my old correspondents the other day about a writer's “voice.” Daily journalism may subdue that voice a bit, but in the Great Reads, I feel very Auntie Mame exclamation-pointish on the matter: Give me more! He sent me Saul Bellow's thoughts on the subject: “It seems to issue from the bosom, from a place beneath the breastbone. It is more musical than verbal, and it is the characteristic signature of a person, of a soul.” Beyond being beautiful, the quote moved me because it echoed a (slightly loopy)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Christopher Hitchens, the engaging and enraging British-American author and essayist whose polemical writings on religion, politics, war and other provocations established him as one of his generation's most robust public intellectuals, has died. He was 62. Hitchens died Thursday night at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, said his literary agent, Steve Wasserman. Hitchens was diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer in June 2010, when his memoir, "Hitch-22," hit the bestseller lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Letters Saul Bellow, edited by Benjamin Taylor Viking: 608 pp, $35 Saul Bellow, being Saul Bellow, coined literary profit from emotional tumult. From personal pain came self-exploration and impish bons mots, poured into the heightened confessional of his fiction and also into the letters he fired off throughout his life. These bulletins from the biographical front, as it were, are now collected in a hefty, handsome volume and show that Bellow, while grappling constantly with moods that swung between euphoria and mad suffering, was never not reaching for rapture and grace.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | Associated Press
Actress Parker Posey and authors Gay Talese and Naomi Wolf will be among those participating in a new line of audiobooks dedicated to famous 20th century books. Audible Inc. says the Audible Modern Vanguard will feature unabridged texts from Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Kurt Vonnegut and other celebrated authors. Audible Inc. is a leading audiobook provider that Amazon.com purchased in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Literary awards are old news for Philip Roth, but his latest honor is truly special: the first PEN/Saul Bellow Award for Achievement in American Fiction, a $40,000 prize named for the late Nobel laureate and one of Roth's closest friends and literary heroes.
BOOKS
February 25, 2007 | Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, Rebecca Newberger Goldstein is a philosopher and novelist. Her last book was "Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity."
I encountered Saul Bellow in the flesh only once. It was at a small afternoon gathering in a town house on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Wide planes of wintry light slammed down from floor-to-ceiling windows, catching sycophants, dust motes and laureate in the slant. At one point I sat on a sofa, conversing with a young child (mine), whom I had been urged by my hostess to bring. I looked up and caught the novelist's steady stare taking in the small tableau of us: Madonna and kvetch.
BOOKS
March 24, 1991 | Joyce Carol Oates, Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University
Artists are navigators of interior landscapes. Biography is a matter of externals, where historical fact is laced with conjecture, the intention being the creation of what might be called the "biographical subject"--like a character in a novel, and, like a character in a novel, sometimes fictitious. Where an artist is the subject of biography, the interior and the exterior landscapes are often at odds.
BOOKS
February 25, 2007 | Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, Rebecca Newberger Goldstein is a philosopher and novelist. Her last book was "Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity."
I encountered Saul Bellow in the flesh only once. It was at a small afternoon gathering in a town house on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Wide planes of wintry light slammed down from floor-to-ceiling windows, catching sycophants, dust motes and laureate in the slant. At one point I sat on a sofa, conversing with a young child (mine), whom I had been urged by my hostess to bring. I looked up and caught the novelist's steady stare taking in the small tableau of us: Madonna and kvetch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | James Atlas, Special to The Times
The work is done. The oeuvre is complete. The energetic production of nearly six decades has come to its inevitable end. Great novelists have their signature styles and themes. The elaborate, suspensefully ramifying sentences of Henry James; the brooding cadences of Hawthorne: You can open a book of theirs to any page and identify their instantly distinctive voices. Saul Bellow also possessed a distinctive voice, but what is so remarkable about his work is its tremendous versatility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2005 | Jon Thurber and Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writers
Saul Bellow, the Nobel Prize-winning giant of American letters whose erudite writing portrayed men in the throes of profound spiritual crisis in a dangerous, even brutal world, died Tuesday. He was 89. Bellow died at his home in Brookline, Mass., said his lawyer and longtime friend, Walter Pozen, who added that the author had been in failing health for some time but was mentally sharp to the end. Bellow's wife, Janis, and their young daughter, Naomi Rose, were with him when he died.
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