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Saul Friedlander

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February 23, 1997 | WALTER LAQUEUR, Walter Laqueur is the former director of the Institute of Contemporary History in London and author of numerous books, including "Young Germany" and, most recently, "Fascism" (Oxford University Press)
On Nazism and the Jews a great deal has been written--personal accounts and learned monographs--but there are very few full-scale, general works and, as far as the prewar period is concerned, Saul Friedlander's work (the first of two volumes) is not just a fine book, it is the only one we have so far.
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July 15, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
THERE comes a moment in life when the weight of memory and emotion can lead to action. For Saul Friedlander, that moment arrived when he stumbled upon a misfiled Nazi document in Bonn, during research for a book on U.S.-German relations before World War II. During 1941, as news of Hitler's atrocities began spreading, Pope Pius XII had warmly invited the Berlin Opera to perform selections from Wagner at the Vatican, according to a formerly secret telegram that Friedlander read.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Israeli historian and UCLA professor Saul Friedlander will receive the top prize of the Frankfurt Book Fair in recognition of his narratives documenting the Nazi Holocaust, the German Book Trade association said Thursday. Friedlander, 74, is to be given the $33,000 peace prize during the annual book fair in October. Among his best-known works is his two-volume collection, "Nazi Germany and the Jews."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Israeli historian and UCLA professor Saul Friedlander will receive the top prize of the Frankfurt Book Fair in recognition of his narratives documenting the Nazi Holocaust, the German Book Trade association said Thursday. Friedlander, 74, is to be given the $33,000 peace prize during the annual book fair in October. Among his best-known works is his two-volume collection, "Nazi Germany and the Jews."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
THERE comes a moment in life when the weight of memory and emotion can lead to action. For Saul Friedlander, that moment arrived when he stumbled upon a misfiled Nazi document in Bonn, during research for a book on U.S.-German relations before World War II. During 1941, as news of Hitler's atrocities began spreading, Pope Pius XII had warmly invited the Berlin Opera to perform selections from Wagner at the Vatican, according to a formerly secret telegram that Friedlander read.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting today, we can call Saul Friedlander a genius with total confidence. The 66-year-old historian and UCLA professor is now officially a "genius award" winner. The prize, which Friedlander didn't even know he was in the running for, is a fellowship from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. It is presented each year to as many as 40 new fellows (there are 32 this year) whose creative work is supported by a five-year grant.
OPINION
April 13, 2008 | Swati Pandey, Swati Pandey, an assistant articles editor for the Times' opinion pages.
To appreciate the achievement of Saul Friedlander's newest book, "The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945," which won the Pulitzer Prize last week, consider what befell the author during those years. In 1942, Friedlander's parents left their son in a French monastery before leaving for Switzerland. Friedlander was raised there as a Catholic. His parents were stopped by the Swiss, passed back to the French, and in turn, handed over to the Germans. They died in Auschwitz.
BOOKS
March 1, 1998
FIRST FICTION WINNER: "Don't Erase Me: Stories" by Carolyn Ferrell (Houghton Mifflin) FINALISTS: "A Crime in the Neighborhood: A Novel" by Suzanne Berne (Algonquin) "Round Rock: A Novel" by Michelle Huneven (Alfred A. Knopf) "A Child Out of Alcatraz" by Tara Ison (Faber and Faber) "The God of Small Things" by Arundhati Roy (Random House) FICTION WINNER: "In the Rogue Blood" by James Carlos Blake (Avon Books) FINALISTS: "Reading In the Dark" by Seamus Deane (Alfred A. Knopf)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Samuel Goetz was 14 when the Nazis rounded up Jews in his hometown of Tarnow, Poland, and killed thousands of them - his parents included - in the gas chambers at Belzec in southeast Poland. A few months later, he too was forced out of Tarnow and into the first of several Nazi labor camps in Eastern Europe. "I thought often [about] how I'm going to die," he recalled in a 1999 CNN interview, "whether it's going to be a bullet, would it hurt. I really did not know. " Instead, he was among the survivors.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting today, we can call Saul Friedlander a genius with total confidence. The 66-year-old historian and UCLA professor is now officially a "genius award" winner. The prize, which Friedlander didn't even know he was in the running for, is a fellowship from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. It is presented each year to as many as 40 new fellows (there are 32 this year) whose creative work is supported by a five-year grant.
BOOKS
February 23, 1997 | WALTER LAQUEUR, Walter Laqueur is the former director of the Institute of Contemporary History in London and author of numerous books, including "Young Germany" and, most recently, "Fascism" (Oxford University Press)
On Nazism and the Jews a great deal has been written--personal accounts and learned monographs--but there are very few full-scale, general works and, as far as the prewar period is concerned, Saul Friedlander's work (the first of two volumes) is not just a fine book, it is the only one we have so far.
OPINION
April 5, 1987 | LAURENCE GOLDSTEIN, Laurence Goldstein is a professor of English at the University of Michigan, where he edits the Michigan Quarterly Review.
In a recent book of poems about the Holocaust, William Heyen recalls that his German parents took him to the Volksfest on Long Island every summer just after World War II. He remembers his delight at the stands of smoked eel and loaves of dark bread, and the nostalgic talk about the North Sea, the Rhine, the Black Forest. He also remembers that all those years there was one word I never heard, one name never mentioned. The name of course was Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes the best reason to choose an audio book is not for the genre or the author but for the reader. One could do no better than Alan Rickman narrating Thomas Hardy's "The Return of the Native" (Cover to Cover, unabridged fiction, 12 cassettes; 15 hours, 45 minutes; $44.95). Written in 1878, this tragic romantic melodrama takes place on Egdon Heath in the fictional southwestern English county of Wessex.
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